TY - JOUR ID - 2422 TI - Determination of sex by jasmonate JO - J Integr Plant Biol PY - 2020 SP - 162-164 AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 62 UR - https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jipb.12840 DO - 10.1111/jipb.12840 AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 2581 TI - Sulfation switch in the shade JO - Nat Plants PY - 2020 SP - 186-187 AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 6 UR - https://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41477-020-0620-8 DO - 10.1038/s41477-020-0620-8 AB - Plants adjust the balance between growth and defence using photoreceptors and jasmonates. Levels of active jasmonates are reduced in a phytochrome B-dependent manner by upregulation of a 12-hydroxyjasmonate sulfotransferase, leading to increase in shade avoidance and decrease in defence. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 2120 TI - Jasmonates are signals in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites — Pathways, transcription factors and applied aspects — A brief review. JO - New Biotechnol PY - 2019 SP - 1-11 AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Strnad, M. VL - 48 UR - http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1871678417304429 DO - 10.1016/j.nbt.2017.09.007 AB - Jasmonates (JAs) are signals in plant stress responses and development. One of the first observed and prominent responses to JAs is the induction of biosynthesis of different groups of secondary compounds. Among them are nicotine, isoquinolines, glucosinolates, anthocyanins, benzophenanthridine alkaloids, artemisinin, and terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs), such as vinblastine. This brief review describes modes of action of JAs in the biosynthesis of anthocyanins, nicotine, TIAs, glucosinolates and artemisinin. After introducing JA biosynthesis, the central role of the SCFCOI1-JAZ co-receptor complex in JA perception and MYB-type and MYC-type transcription factors is described. Brief comments are provided on primary metabolites as precursors of secondary compounds. Pathways for the biosynthesis of anthocyanin, nicotine, TIAs, glucosinolates and artemisinin are described with an emphasis on JA-dependent transcription factors, which activate or repress the expression of essential genes encoding enzymes in the biosynthesis of these secondary compounds. Applied aspects are discussed using the biotechnological formation of artemisinin as an example of JA-induced biosynthesis of secondary compounds in plant cell factories. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 2275 TI - New Light on Local and Systemic Wound Signaling JO - Trends Plant Sci PY - 2019 SP - 102-105 AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 24 UR - https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tplants.2018.11.009 DO - 10.1016/j.tplants.2018.11.009 AB - Electric signaling and Ca2+ waves were discussed to occur in systemic wound responses. Two new overlapping scenarios were identified: (i) membrane depolarization in two special cell types followed by an increase in systemic cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt), and (ii) glutamate sensed by GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR LIKE proteins and followed by Ca2+-based defense in distal leaves. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 2440 TI - Termination in Jasmonate Signaling by MYC2 and MTBs JO - Trends Plant Sci PY - 2019 SP - 667-669 AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 24 UR - https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tplants.2019.06.001 DO - 10.1016/j.tplants.2019.06.001 AB - Jasmonic acid (JA) signaling can be switched off by metabolism of JA. The master regulator MYC2, interacting with MED25, has been shown to be deactivated by the bHLH transcription factors MTB1, MTB2, and MTB3. An autoregulatory negative feedback loop has been proposed for this termination in JA signaling. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 2527 TI - Benno Parthier (1932–2019) JO - Plant Mol Biol PY - 2019 SP - 519-520 AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Hause, B. AU - Abel, S. VL - 101 UR - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11103-019-00927-6 DO - 10.1007/s11103-019-00927-6 AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - JOUR ID - 2454 TI - The missing link in jasmonic acid biosynthesis JO - Nat Plants PY - 2019 SP - 776-777 AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Hause, B. VL - 5 UR - https://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41477-019-0492-y DO - 10.1038/s41477-019-0492-y AB - Jasmonic acid biosynthesis starts in chloroplasts and is finalized in peroxisomes. The required export of a crucial intermediate out of the chloroplast is now shown to be mediated by a protein from the outer envelope called JASSY. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - JOUR ID - 2183 TI - A Bypass in Jasmonate Biosynthesis – the OPR3-independent Formation JO - Trends Plant Sci PY - 2018 SP - 276-279 AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Hause, B. VL - 23 UR - https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1360138518300426 DO - 10.1016/j.tplants.2018.02.011 AB - For the first time in 25 years, a new pathway for biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (JA) has been identified. JA production takes place via 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) including reduction by OPDA reductases (OPRs). A loss-of-function allele, opr3-3, revealed an OPR3-independent pathway converting OPDA to JA. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - JOUR ID - 2237 TI - Jasmonates: News on Occurrence, Biosynthesis, Metabolism and Action of an Ancient Group of Signaling Compounds JO - Int J Mol Sci PY - 2018 SP - 2539 AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Strnad, M. VL - 19 UR - https://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms19092539 DO - 10.3390/ijms19092539 AB - Jasmonic acid (JA) and its related derivatives are ubiquitously occurring compounds of land plants acting in numerous stress responses and development. Recent studies on evolution of JA and other oxylipins indicated conserved biosynthesis. JA formation is initiated by oxygenation of α-linolenic acid (α-LeA, 18:3) or 16:3 fatty acid of chloroplast membranes leading to 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) as intermediate compound, but in Marchantiapolymorpha and Physcomitrellapatens, OPDA and some of its derivatives are final products active in a conserved signaling pathway. JA formation and its metabolic conversion take place in chloroplasts, peroxisomes and cytosol, respectively. Metabolites of JA are formed in 12 different pathways leading to active, inactive and partially active compounds. The isoleucine conjugate of JA (JA-Ile) is the ligand of the receptor component COI1 in vascular plants, whereas in the bryophyte M. polymorpha COI1 perceives an OPDA derivative indicating its functionally conserved activity. JA-induced gene expressions in the numerous biotic and abiotic stress responses and development are initiated in a well-studied complex regulation by homeostasis of transcription factors functioning as repressors and activators. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 2127 TI - The Oxylipin Pathways: Biochemistry and Function JO - Annu Rev Plant Biol PY - 2018 SP - 363-386 AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Feussner, I. VL - 69 UR - https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-arplant-042817-040440 DO - 10.1146/annurev-arplant-042817-040440 AB - Plant oxylipins form a constantly growing group of signaling molecules that comprise oxygenated fatty acids and metabolites derived therefrom. In the last decade, the understanding of biosynthesis, metabolism, and action of oxylipins, especially jasmonates, has dramatically improved. Additional mechanistic insights into the action of enzymes and insights into signaling pathways have been deepened for jasmonates. For other oxylipins, such as the hydroxy fatty acids, individual signaling properties and cross talk between different oxylipins or even with additional phytohormones have recently been described. This review summarizes recent understanding of the biosynthesis, regulation, and function of oxylipins. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 2103 TI - A plant's balance of growth and defense - revisited JO - New Phytol PY - 2017 SP - 1291-1294 AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 215 UR - http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/nph.14720/abstract DO - 10.1111/nph.14720 AB - This article is a Commentary on Major et al., 215: 1533–1547. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 2016 TI - Jasmonates: biosynthesis, metabolism, and signaling by proteins activating and repressing transciption JO - J Exp Bot PY - 2017 SP - 1303-1321 AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Song, S. VL - 68 UR - http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2016/12/10/jxb.erw443.abstract DO - 10.1093/jxb/erw443 AB - The lipid-derived phytohormone jasmonate (JA) regulates plant growth, development, secondary metabolism, defense against insect attack and pathogen infection, and tolerance to abiotic stresses such as wounding, UV light, salt, and drought. JA was first identified in 1962, and since the 1980s many studies have analyzed the physiological functions, biosynthesis, distribution, metabolism, perception, signaling, and crosstalk of JA, greatly expanding our knowledge of the hormone’s action. In response to fluctuating environmental cues and transient endogenous signals, the occurrence of multilayered organization of biosynthesis and inactivation of JA, and activation and repression of the COI1–JAZ-based perception and signaling contributes to the fine-tuning of JA responses. This review describes the JA biosynthetic enzymes in terms of gene families, enzymatic activity, location and regulation, substrate specificity and products, the metabolic pathways in converting JA to activate or inactivate compounds, JA signaling in perception, and the co-existence of signaling activators and repressors A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 2044 TI - The Trojan horse coronatine: the COI1–JAZ2–MYC2,3,4–ANAC019,055,072 module in stomata dynamics upon bacterial infection. JO - New Phytol PY - 2017 SP - 972-975 AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 213 UR - http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/nph.2017.213.issue-3/issuetoc DO - 10.1111/nph.14417 AB - Coronatine (COR) is a phytotoxin produced by a plasmid-encoded operon of genes in several strains of Pseudomonas syringae (Bender et al., 1999). It is a mimic of the defense-associated phytohormone jasmonic acid isoleucine and delivered by the phytopathogenic bacterium to gain access to host plants through stomatal entry and to repress a specific sector of plant immunity. In this issue of New Phytologist (pp. 1378–1392) Gimenez-Ibanez et al. reveal exciting insights into the transcriptional regulation of COR/jasmonic acid isoleucine-governed transcriptional networks modulating stomatal aperture during bacterial invasion. A2 - C1 - ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1838 TI - Jasmonate signaling in plant stress responses and development – active and inactive compounds JO - New Biotechnology PY - 2016 SP - 604-613 AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Strnad, M. VL - 33 B UR - http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/18716784 DO - 10.1016/j.nbt.2015.11.001 AB - Jasmonates (JAs) are lipid-derived signals mediating plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses and in plant development. Following the elucidation of each step in their biosynthesis and the important components of perception and signaling, several activators, repressors and co-repressors have been identified which contribute to fine-tuning the regulation of JA-induced gene expression. Many of the metabolic reactions in which JA participates, such as conjugation with amino acids, glucosylation, hydroxylation, carboxylation, sulfation and methylation, lead to numerous compounds with different biological activities. These metabolites may be highly active, partially active in specific processes or inactive. Hydroxylation, carboxylation and sulfation inactivate JA signaling. The precursor of JA biosynthesis, 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA), has been identified as a JA-independent signaling compound. An increasing number of OPDA-specific processes is being identified. To conclude, the numerous JA compounds and their different modes of action allow plants to respond specifically and flexibly to alterations in the environment. A2 - C1 - ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1851 TI - A previously undescribed jasmonate compound in flowering Arabidopsis thaliana – The identification of cis-(+)-OPDA-Ile. JO - Phytochemistry PY - 2016 SP - 230-237 AU - Floková, K. AU - Feussner, K. AU - Herrfurth, C. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Mik, V. AU - Tarkowská, D. AU - Strnad, M. AU - Feussner, I. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Novák, O. VL - 122 UR - DO - 10.1016/j.phytochem.2015.11.012 AB - Jasmonates (JAs) are plant hormones that integrate external stress stimuli with physiological responses. (+)-7-iso-JA-L-Ile is the natural JA ligand of COI1, a component of a known JA receptor. The upstream JA biosynthetic precursor cis-(+)-12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (cis-(+)-OPDA) has been reported to act independently of COI1 as an essential signal in several stress-induced and developmental processes. Wound-induced increases in the endogenous levels of JA/JA-Ile are accompanied by two to tenfold increases in the concentration of OPDA, but its means of perception and metabolism are unknown. To screen for putative OPDA metabolites, vegetative tissues of flowering Arabidopsis thaliana were extracted with 25% aqueous methanol (v/v), purified by single-step reversed-phase polymer-based solid-phase extraction, and analyzed by high throughput mass spectrometry. This enabled the detection and quantitation of a low abundant OPDA analog of the biologically active (+)-7-iso-JA-L-Ile in plant tissue samples. Levels of the newly identified compound and the related phytohormones JA, JA-Ile and cis-(+)-OPDA were monitored in wounded leaves of flowering Arabidopsis lines (Col-0 and Ws) and compared to the levels observed in Arabidopsis mutants deficient in the biosynthesis of JA (dde2-2, opr3) and JA-Ile (jar1). The observed cis-(+)-OPDA-Ile levels varied widely, raising questions concerning its role in Arabidopsis stress responses. A2 - C1 - ER - TY - CHAP ID - 1928 TI - Jasmonates: Synthesis, Metabolism, Signal Transduction and Action T2 - eLS PB - PY - 2016 SP - AU - Wasternack, C. VL - UR - https://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9780470015902.a0020138.pub2 SN - ISBN 978-0-4700-1590-2 DO - 10.1002/9780470015902.a0020138.pub2 AB - Jasmonic acid and other fatty-acid-derived compounds called oxylipins are signals in stress responses and development of plants. The receptor complex, signal transduction components as well as repressors and activators in jasmonate-induced gene expression have been elucidated. Different regulatory levels and cross-talk with other hormones are responsible for the multiplicity of plant responses to environmental and developmental cues. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 2012 TI - OPDA-Ile – a new JA-Ile-independent signal? JO - Plant Signal Behav PY - 2016 SP - e125364600 AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Hause, B. VL - 11 UR - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15592324.2016.1253646 DO - 10.1080/15592324.2016.1253646 AB - AbstractExpression takes place for most of the jasmonic acid (JA)-induced genes in a COI1- dependent manner via perception of its conjugate JA-Ile in the SCFCOI1-JAZ co-receptor complex. There are, however, numerous genes and processes, which are preferentially induced COI1-independently by the precursor of JA, 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA). After recent identification of the Ile-conjugate of OPDA, OPDA-Ile, biological activity of this compound could be unequivocally proven in terms of gene expression. Any interference of OPDA, JA, or JA-Ile in OPDA-Ile-induced gene expression could be excluded by using different genetic background. The data suggest individual signaling properties of OPDA-Ile. Future studies for analysis of an SCFCOI1-JAZ co-receptor-independent route of signaling are proposed. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1804 TI - How Jasmonates Earned their Laurels: Past and Present JO - Journal of Plant Growth Regulation PY - 2015 SP - 761-794 AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 34 (4) UR - DO - 10.1007/s00344-015-9526-5 AB - The histories of research regarding all plant hormones are similar. Identification and structural elucidation have been followed by analyses of their biosynthesis, distributions, signaling cascades, roles in developmental or stress response programs, and crosstalk. Jasmonic acid (JA) and its derivatives comprise a group of plant hormones that were discovered recently, compared to auxin, abscisic acid, cytokinins, gibberellic acid, and ethylene. Nevertheless, there have been tremendous advances in JA research, following the general progression outlined above and parallel efforts focused on several other “new” plant hormones (brassinosteroids, salicylate, and strigolactones). This review focuses on historical aspects of the identification of jasmonates, and characterization of their biosynthesis, distribution, perception, signaling pathways, crosstalk with other hormones and roles in plant stress responses and development. The aim is to illustrate how our present knowledge on jasmonates was generated and how that influences current efforts to extend our knowledge. KW - Applied aspects A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1599 TI - Action of jasmonates in plant stress responses and development — Applied aspects JO - Biotechnol Adv PY - 2014 SP - 31-39 AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 32 UR - http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/07349750/32/1 DO - 10.1016/j.biotechadv.2013.09.009 AB - Jasmonates (JAs) are lipid-derived compounds acting as key signaling compounds in plant stress responses and development. The JA co-receptor complex and several enzymes of JA biosynthesis have been crystallized, and various JA signal transduction pathways including cross-talk to most of the plant hormones have been intensively studied. Defense to herbivores and necrotrophic pathogens are mediated by JA. Other environmental cues mediated by JA are light, seasonal and circadian rhythms, cold stress, desiccation stress, salt stress and UV stress. During development growth inhibition of roots, shoots and leaves occur by JA, whereas seed germination and flower development are partially affected by its precursor 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA). Based on these numerous JA mediated signal transduction pathways active in plant stress responses and development, there is an increasing interest in horticultural and biotechnological applications. Intercropping, the mixed growth of two or more crops, mycorrhization of plants, establishment of induced resistance, priming of plants for enhanced insect resistance as well as pre- and post-harvest application of JA are few examples. Additional sources for horticultural improvement, where JAs might be involved, are defense against nematodes, biocontrol by plant growth promoting rhizobacteria, altered composition of rhizosphere bacterial community, sustained balance between growth and defense, and improved plant immunity in intercropping systems. Finally, biotechnological application for JA-induced production of pharmaceuticals and application of JAs as anti-cancer agents were intensively studied. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1702 TI - Jasmonic acid and its precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid control different aspects of constitutive and induced herbivore defenses in tomato JO - Plant Physiology PY - 2014 SP - 396-410 AU - Bosch, M. AU - Wright, L. P. AU - Gershenzon, J. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Hause, B. AU - Schaller, A. AU - Stintzi, A. VL - 166 UR - http://www.plantphysiol.org/search?author1=&fulltext=&pubdate_year=2014&volume=166&firstpage=396&submit=yes DO - 10.1104/pp.114.237388 AB - The jasmonate family of growth regulators includes the isoleucine conjugate of jasmonic acid (JA-Ile) and its biosynthetic precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA) as signaling molecules. In order to assess the relative contribution of JA/JA-Ile and OPDA to insect resistance in tomato, we silenced the expression of OPDA reductase (OPR3) by RNA interference. Consistent with a block in the biosynthetic pathway downstream of OPDA, OPR3-RNAi plants contained wild-type levels of OPDA but failed to accumulate JA or JA-Ile after wounding. JA/JA-Ile deficiency in OPR3-RNAi plants resulted in reduced trichome formation and impaired monoterpene and sesquiterpene production. The loss of these JA/JA-Ile-dependent defense traits rendered them more attractive to the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta with respect to feeding and oviposition. Oviposition preference resulted from reduced levels of repellant mono- and sesquiterpenes. Feeding preference, on the other hand, was caused by increased production of cis-3-hexenal acting as a feeding stimulant for M. sexta larvae in OPR3-RNAi plants. Despite impaired constitutive defenses and increased palatability of OPR3-RNAi leaves, larval development was indistinguishable on OPR3-RNAi and wild-type plants, and much delayed as compared to development on the JA/JA-Ile insensitive (jai1) mutant. Apparently, signaling through JAI1, the tomato ortholog of COI1 in Arabidopsis, is required for defense while the conversion of OPDA to JA/JA-Ile is not. Comparing the signaling activities of OPDA and JA/JA-Ile, we found that OPDA can substitute for JA/JA-Ile in the local induction of defense gene expression, but the production of JA/JA-Ile is required for a systemic response. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1640 TI - Jasmonsäure – ein universelles Pflanzenhormon: Blütenduft, Abwehr, Entwicklung JO - Biologie in unserer Zeit PY - 2014 SP - 164 - 171 AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Hause, B. VL - 44 UR - http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/biuz.201410535/pdf DO - 10.1002/biuz.201410535 AB - Jasmonsäure (JA) und ihre Metaboliten kommen in allen niederen und höheren Pflanzen vor. Sie sind universell wirksame, aus Lipiden gebildete Signalstoffe bei der Abwehr von biotischem und abiotischem Stress sowie in der pflanzlichen Entwicklung. Rezeptor und Komponenten von JA–Signalketten wurden identifiziert. In der Entwicklung von Blüten, Früchten, Samen, Trichomen oder in der Abwehr von Insekten und Pathogenen treten ähnliche JA-vermittelte Signalproteine auf, die eine Feinregulation der Prozesse erlauben und eine Verbindung (cross-talk) zu anderenPflanzenhormonen aufweisen. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - CHAP ID - 1618 TI - Jasmonates in plant growth and stress responses. T2 - Phytohormones: a window to metabolism, signaling and biotechnological applications. PB - PY - 2014 SP - 221-264 AU - Wasternack, C. VL - Springer UR - http://www.springer.com/de/book/9781493904907 SN - 978-1-4939-0490-7 (hardcover) 978-1-4939-4814-7 (softcover) DO - 10.1007/978-1-4939-0491-4_8 AB - Abiotic and biotic stresses adversely affect plant growth and productivity. The phytohormones regulate key physiological events under normal and stressful conditions for plant development. Accumulative research efforts have discovered important roles of phytohormones and their interactions in regulation of plant adaptation to numerous stressors. Intensive molecular studies have elucidated various plant hormonal pathways; each of which consist of many signaling components that link a specific hormone perception to the regulation of downstream genes. Signal transduction pathways of auxin, abscisic acid, cytokinins, gibberellins and ethylene have been thoroughly investigated. More recently, emerging signaling pathways of brassinosteroids, jasmonates, salicylic acid and strigolactones offer an exciting gateway for understanding their multiple roles in plant physiological processes.At the molecular level, phytohormonal crosstalks can be antagonistic or synergistic or additive in actions. Additionally, the signal transduction component(s) of one hormonal pathway may interplay with the signaling component(s) of other hormonal pathway(s). Together these and other research findings have revolutionized the concept of phytohormonal studies in plants. Importantly, genetic engineering now enables plant biologists to manipulate the signaling pathways of plant hormones for development of crop varieties with improved yield and stress tolerance.This book, written by internationally recognized scholars from various countries, represents the state-of-the-art understanding of plant hormones’ biology, signal transduction and implications. Aimed at a wide range of readers, including researchers, students, teachers and many others who have interests in this flourishing research field, every section is concluded with biotechnological strategies to modulate hormone contents or signal transduction pathways and crosstalk that enable us to develop crops in a sustainable manner. Given the important physiological implications of plant hormones in stressful environments, our book is finalized with chapters on phytohormonal crosstalks under abiotic and biotic stresses. A2 - Tran, L.-S.; Pal, S. C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1628 TI - Perception, signaling and cross-talk of jasmonates and the seminal contributions of the Daoxin Xie´s lab and the Chuanyou Li´s lab JO - Plant Cell Rep PY - 2014 SP - 707-718 AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 33 UR - http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00299-014-1608-5 DO - 10.1007/s00299-014-1608-5 AB - Jasmonates (JAs) are lipid-derived signals in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses and in development. The most active JA compound is (+)-7-iso-JA-Ile, a JA conjugate with isoleucine. Biosynthesis, metabolism and key components of perception and signal transduction have been identified and numerous JA-induced gene expression data collected. For JA-Ile perception, the SCFCOI1–JAZ co-receptor complex has been identified and crystalized. Activators such as MYC2 and repressors such as JAZs including their targets were found. Involvement of JA-Ile in response to herbivores and pathogens and in root growth inhibition is among the most studied aspects of JA-Ile signaling. There are an increasing number of examples, where JA-Ile shows cross-talk with other plant hormones. Seminal contributions in JA/JA-Ile research were given by Daoxin Xie’s lab and Chuanyou Li’s lab, both in Beijing. Here, characterization was done regarding components of the JA-Ile receptor, such as COI1 (JAI1) and SCF, regarding activators (MYCs, MYBs) and repressors (JAV1, bHLH IIId’s) of JA-regulated gene expression, as well as regarding components of auxin biosynthesis and action, such as the transcription factor PLETHORA active in the root stem cell niche. This overview reflects the work of both labs in the light of our present knowledge on biosynthesis, perception and signal transduction of JA/JA-Ile and its cross-talk to other hormones. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1693 TI - Jasmonate signaling and crosstalk with gibberellin and ethylene JO - Curr Opin Plant Biol. PY - 2014 SP - 112-119 AU - Song, S. AU - Qi, T. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Xie, D. VL - 21 UR - http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1369526614001022 DO - 10.1016/j.pbi.2014.07.005 AB - The phytohormone jasmonate (JA) plays essential roles in plant growth, development and defense. In response to the JA signal, the CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1 (COI1)-based SCF complexes recruit JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) repressors for ubiquitination and degradation, and subsequently regulate their downstream signaling components essential for various JA responses. Tremendous progress has been made in understanding the JA signaling pathway and its crosstalk with other phytohormone pathways during the past two decades. Recent studies have revealed that a variety of positive and negative regulators act as targets of JAZs to control distinctive JA responses, and that JAZs and these regulators function as crucial interfaces to mediate synergy and antagonism between JA and other phytohormones. Owing to different regulatory players in JA perception and JA signaling, a fine-tuning of JA-dependent processes in plant growth, development and defense is achieved. In this review, we will summarize the latest progresses in JA signaling and its crosstalk with gibberellin and ethylene. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1650 TI - UHPLC-MS/MS based target profiling of stress-induced phytohormones JO - Phytochemistry PY - 2014 SP - 147-157 AU - Floková, K. AU - Tarkowská, D. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Strnad, M. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Novak, O. VL - 105 UR - http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/00319422 DO - 10.1016/j.phytochem.2014.05.015 AB - Stress-induced changes in phytohormone metabolite profiles have rapid effects on plant metabolic activity and growth. The jasmonates (JAs) are a group of fatty acid-derived stress response regulators with roles in numerous developmental processes. To elucidate their dual regulatory effects, which overlap with those of other important defence-signalling plant hormones such as salicylic acid (SA), abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), we have developed a highly efficient single-step clean-up procedure for their enrichment from complex plant matrices that enables their sensitive quantitative analysis using hyphenated mass spectrometry technique. The rapid extraction of minute quantities of plant material (less than 20 mg fresh weight, FW) into cold 10% methanol followed by one-step reversed-phase polymer-based solid phase extraction significantly reduced matrix effects and increased the recovery of labile JA analytes. This extraction and purification protocol was paired with a highly sensitive and validated ultra-high performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC–MS/MS) method and used to simultaneously profile sixteen stress-induced phytohormones in minute plant material samples, including endogenous JA, several of its biosynthetic precursors and derivatives, as well as SA, ABA and IAA. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1536 TI - Jasmonates: biosynthesis, perception, signal transduction and action in plant stress response, growth and development. An update to the 2007 review in Annals of Botany JO - Annals of Botany PY - 2013 SP - 1021-1058 AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Hause, B. VL - 111 UR - DO - 10.1093/aob/mct067 AB - Background: Jasmonates are important regulators in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses as well as indevelopment. Synthesized from lipid-constituents, the initially formed jasmonic acid is converted to differentmetabolites including the conjugate with isoleucine. Important new components of jasmonate signalling includingits receptor were identified, providing deeper insight into the role of jasmonate signalling pathways in stressresponses and development.Scope: The present review is an update of the review on jasmonates published in this journal in 2007. New dataof the last five years are described with emphasis on metabolites of jasmonates, on jasmonate perception andsignalling, on cross-talk to other plant hormones and on jasmonate signalling in response to herbivores and pathogens,in symbiotic interactions, in flower development, in root growth and in light perception.Conclusions: The last few years have seen breakthroughs in the identification of JASMONATE ZIM DOMAIN(JAZ) proteins and their interactors such as transcription factors and co-repressors, and the crystallization of thejasmonate receptor as well as of the enzyme conjugating jasmonate to amino acids. Now, the complex nature ofnetworks of jasmonate signalling in stress responses and development including hormone cross-talk can beaddressed. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1378 TI - Role of cis-12-oxo-phytodienoic acid in tomato embryo development. JO - Plant Physiol PY - 2012 SP - 1715-1727 AU - Goetz, S. AU - Hellwege, A. AU - Stenzel, I. AU - Kutter, C. AU - Hauptmann, V. AU - Forner, S. AU - McCaig, B. AU - Hause, G. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Hause, B. VL - 158 UR - https://dx.doi.org/10.1104/pp.111.192658 DO - 10.1104/pp.111.192658 AB - Oxylipins including jasmonates are signaling compounds in plant growth, development, and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) most mutants affected in jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis and signaling are male sterile, whereas the JA-insensitive tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutant jai1 is female sterile. The diminished seed formation in jai1 together with the ovule-specific accumulation of the JA biosynthesis enzyme allene oxide cyclase (AOC), which correlates with elevated levels of JAs, suggest a role of oxylipins in tomato flower/seed development. Here, we show that 35S::SlAOC-RNAi lines with strongly reduced AOC in ovules exhibited reduced seed set similarly to the jai1 plants. Investigation of embryo development of wild-type tomato plants showed preferential occurrence of AOC promoter activity and AOC protein accumulation in the developing seed coat and the embryo, whereas 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) was the dominant oxylipin occurring nearly exclusively in the seed coat tissues. The OPDA- and JA-deficient mutant spr2 was delayed in embryo development and showed an increased programmed cell death in the developing seed coat and endosperm. In contrast, the mutant acx1a, which accumulates preferentially OPDA and residual amount of JA, developed embryos similar to the wild type, suggesting a role of OPDA in embryo development. Activity of the residual amount of JA in the acx1a mutant is highly improbable since the known reproductive phenotype of the JA-insensitive mutant jai1 could be rescued by wound-induced formation of OPDA. These data suggest a role of OPDA or an OPDA-related compound for proper embryo development possibly by regulating carbohydrate supply and detoxification. KW - Cell Biology A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1437 TI - ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE (AOC) gene family members of Arabidopsis thaliana: tissue- and organ-specific promoter activities and in vivo heteromerization JO - J Exp Bot PY - 2012 SP - 6125-6138 AU - Stenzel, I. AU - Otto, M. AU - Delker, C. AU - Kirmse, N. AU - Schmidt, D. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Hause, B. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 63 UR - https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jxb/ers261 DO - 10.1093/jxb/ers261 AB - Jasmonates are important signals in plant stress responses and plant development. An essential step in the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (JA) is catalysed by ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE (AOC) which establishes the naturally occurring enantiomeric structure of jasmonates. In Arabidopsis thaliana, four genes encode four functional AOC polypeptides (AOC1, AOC2, AOC3, and AOC4) raising the question of functional redundancy or diversification. Analysis of transcript accumulation revealed an organ-specific expression pattern, whereas detailed inspection of transgenic lines expressing the GUS reporter gene under the control of individual AOC promoters showed partially redundant promoter activities during development: (i) In fully developed leaves, promoter activities of AOC1, AOC2, and AOC3 appeared throughout all leaf tissue, but AOC4 promoter activity was vascular bundle-specific; (ii) only AOC3 and AOC4 showed promoter activities in roots; and (iii) partially specific promoter activities were found for AOC1 and AOC4 in flower development. In situ hybridization of flower stalks confirmed the GUS activity data. Characterization of single and double AOC loss-of-function mutants further corroborates the hypothesis of functional redundancies among individual AOCs due to a lack of phenotypes indicative of JA deficiency (e.g. male sterility). To elucidate whether redundant AOC expression might contribute to regulation on AOC activity level, protein interaction studies using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) were performed and showed that all AOCs can interact among each other. The data suggest a putative regulatory mechanism of temporal and spatial fine-tuning in JA formation by differential expression and via possible heteromerization of the four AOCs. KW - Cell Biology A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1435 TI - Another JA/COI1-independent role of OPDA detected in tomato embryo development. JO - Plant Signal Behav PY - 2012 SP - 1349-1353 AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Goetz, S. AU - Hellwege, A. AU - Forner, S. AU - Strnad, M. AU - Hause, B. VL - 7 UR - http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/kpsb20 DO - 10.4161/psb.21551 AB - Jasmonates (JAs) are ubiquitously occurring signaling compounds in plants formed in response to biotic and abiotic stress as well as in development. (+)-7-iso-jasmonoyl isoleucine, the bioactive JA, is involved in most JA-dependent processes mediated by the F-box protein COI1 in a proteasome-dependent manner. However, there is an increasing number of examples, where the precursor of JA biosynthesis, cis-(+)-12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA) is active in a JA/COI1-independent manner. Here, we discuss those OPDA-dependent processes, thereby giving emphasis on tomato embryo development. Recent data on seed coat-generated OPDA and its role in embryo development is discussed based on biochemical and genetic evidences. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1206 TI - The moss Physcomitrella patens contains cyclopentenones but no jasmonates: mutations in allene oxide cyclase lead to reduced fertility and altered sporophyte morphology JO - New Phytol PY - 2010 SP - 740-749 AU - Stumpe, M. AU - Göbel, C. AU - Faltin, B. AU - Beike, A. K. AU - Hause, B. AU - Himmelsbach, K. AU - Bode, J. AU - Kramell, R. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Frank, W. AU - Reski, R. AU - Feussner, I. VL - 188 (3) UR - http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2010.03406.x/abstract DO - 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2010.03406.x AB - Two cDNAs encoding allene oxide cyclases (PpAOC1, PpAOC2), key enzymes in the formation of jasmonic acid (JA) and its precursor (9S,13S)‐12‐oxo‐phytodienoic acid (cis‐(+)‐OPDA), were isolated from the moss Physcomitrella patens.Recombinant PpAOC1 and PpAOC2 show substrate specificity against the allene oxide derived from 13‐hydroperoxy linolenic acid (13‐HPOTE); PpAOC2 also shows substrate specificity against the allene oxide derived from 12‐hydroperoxy arachidonic acid (12‐HPETE).In protonema and gametophores the occurrence of cis‐(+)‐OPDA, but neither JA nor the isoleucine conjugate of JA nor that of cis‐(+)‐OPDA was detected.Targeted knockout mutants for PpAOC1 and for PpAOC2 were generated, while double mutants could not be obtained. The ΔPpAOC1 and ΔPpAOC2 mutants showed reduced fertility, aberrant sporophyte morphology and interrupted sporogenesis. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1160 TI - Jasmonates: Structural Requirements for Lipid-Derived Signals Active in Plant Stress Responses and Development JO - ACS Chem Biol PY - 2010 SP - 63-77 AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Kombrink, E. VL - 5 UR - http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/cb900269u?journalCode=acbcct&quickLinkVolume=5&quickLinkPage=63&selectedTab=citation&volume=5 DO - 10.1021/cb900269u AB - Jasmonates are lipid-derived signals that mediate plant stress responses and development processes. Enzymes participating in biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (JA) (1, 2) and components of JA signaling have been extensively characterized by biochemical and molecular-genetic tools. Mutants of Arabidopsis and tomato have helped to define the pathway for synthesis of jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile), the active form of JA, and to identify the F-box protein COI1 as central regulatory unit. However, details of the molecular mechanism of JA signaling have only recently been unraveled by the discovery of JAZ proteins that function in transcriptional repression. The emerging picture of JA perception and signaling cascade implies the SCFCOI1 complex operating as E3 ubiquitin ligase that upon binding of JA-Ile targets JAZ repressors for degradation by the 26S-proteasome pathway, thereby allowing the transcription factor MYC2 to activate gene expression. The fact that only one particular stereoisomer, (+)-7-iso-JA-l-Ile (4), shows high biological activity suggests that epimerization between active and inactive diastereomers could be a mechanism for turning JA signaling on or off. The recent demonstration that COI1 directly binds (+)-7-iso-JA-l-Ile (4) and thus functions as JA receptor revealed that formation of the ternary complex COI1-JA-Ile-JAZ is an ordered process. The pronounced differences in biological activity of JA stereoisomers also imply strict stereospecific control of product formation along the JA biosynthetic pathway. The pathway of JA biosynthesis has been unraveled, and most of the participating enzymes are well-characterized. For key enzymes of JA biosynthesis the crystal structures have been established, allowing insight into the mechanisms of catalysis and modes of substrate binding that lead to formation of stereospecific products. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1187 TI - The genuine ligand of a jasmonic acid receptor: Improved analysis of jasmonates is now required. JO - Plant Signal Behav PY - 2010 SP - 337-340 AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Xie, D. VL - 5 UR - https://dx.doi.org/10.4161/psb.5.4.11574 DO - 10.4161/psb.5.4.11574 AB - Jasmonic acid (JA), its metabolites, such as the methyl ester or amino acid conjugates as well as its precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA) are lipid-derived signals. JA, OPDA and JA-amino acid conjugates are known to function as signals in plant stress responses and development. More recently, formation of JA-amino acid conjugates and high biological activity of JA-Isoleucine (JA-Ile) were found to be essential in JA signaling. A breakthrough was the identification of JAZ proteins which interact with the F-box protein COI1 if JA-Ile is bound. This interaction leads to proteasomal degradation of JAZs being negative regulators of JA-induced transcription. Surprisingly, a distinct stereoisomer of JA-Ile, the (+)-7-iso-JA-Ile [(3R,7S) form] is most active. Coronatine, a bacterial phytotoxine with an identical stereochemistry at the cyclopentanone ring, has a similar bioactivity. This was explained by the recent identification of COI1 as the JA receptor and accords well with molecular modeling studies. Whereas over the last two decades JA was quantified to describe any JA dependent process, now we have to take into account a distinct stereoisomer of JA-Ile. Until recently a quantitative analysis of (+)-7-iso-JA-Ile was missing presumable due to its equilibration to (−)-JA-Ile. Now such an analysis was achieved. These aspects will be discussed based on our new knowledge on JA perception and signaling. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1189 TI - Jasmonate and Phytochrome A Signaling in Arabidopsis Wound and Shade Responses Are Integrated through JAZ1 Stability JO - Plant Cell PY - 2010 SP - 1143-1160 AU - Robson, F. AU - Okamoto, H. AU - Patrick, E. AU - Harris, S.-R. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Brearley, C. AU - Turner, J. G. VL - 22 UR - https://dx.doi.org/10.1105/tpc.109.067728 DO - 10.1105/tpc.109.067728 AB - Jasmonate (JA) activates plant defense, promotes pollen maturation, and suppresses plant growth. An emerging theme in JA biology is its involvement in light responses; here, we examine the interdependence of the JA- and light-signaling pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that mutants deficient in JA biosynthesis and signaling are deficient in a subset of high irradiance responses in far-red (FR) light. These mutants display exaggerated shade responses to low, but not high, R/FR ratio light, suggesting a role for JA in phytochrome A (phyA) signaling. Additionally, we demonstrate that the FR lightinduced expression of transcription factor genes is dependent on CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 (COI1), a central component of JA signaling, and is suppressed by JA. phyA mutants had reduced JA-regulated growth inhibition and VSP expression and increased content of cis-(+)-12-oxophytodienoic acid, an intermediate in JA biosynthesis. Significantly, COI1-mediated degradation of JASMONATE ZIM DOMAIN1-b-glucuronidase (JAZ1-GUS) in response to mechanical wounding and JA treatment required phyA, and ectopic expression of JAZ1-GUS resulted in exaggerated shade responses.Together, these results indicate that JA and phyA signaling are integrated through degradation of the JAZ1 protein, and both are required for plant responses to light and stress. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - CHAP ID - 1158 TI - Jasmonates in Stress, Growth, and Development T2 - Plant Stress Biology: From Genomics to Systems Biology PB - WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim PY - 2010 SP - 91 - 118 AU - Wasternack, C. VL - UR - SN - 978-3-527-32290-9 DO - 10.1002/9783527628964.ch5 AB - A2 - H. Hirt C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1215 TI - Salicylate-mediated suppression of jasmonate-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis is targeted downstream of the jasmonate biosynthesis pathway JO - Planta PY - 2010 SP - 1423-1432 AU - Leon-Reyes, A. AU - Van der Does, D. AU - De Lange, E. S. AU - Delker, C. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Van Wees, S. C. M. AU - Ritsema, T. AU - Pieterse, C. M. J. VL - 232 UR - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00425-010-1265-z DO - 10.1007/s00425-010-1265-z AB - Jasmonates (JAs) and salicylic acid (SA) are plant hormones that play pivotal roles in the regulation of induced defenses against microbial pathogens and insect herbivores. Their signaling pathways cross-communicate providing the plant with a regulatory potential to finely tune its defense response to the attacker(s) encountered. In Arabidopsis thaliana, SA strongly antagonizes the jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway, resulting in the downregulation of a large set of JA-responsive genes, including the marker genes PDF1.2 and VSP2. Induction of JA-responsive marker gene expression by different JA derivatives was equally sensitive to SA-mediated suppression. Activation of genes encoding key enzymes in the JA biosynthesis pathway, such as LOX2, AOS, AOC2, and OPR3 was also repressed by SA, suggesting that the JA biosynthesis pathway may be a target for SA-mediated antagonism. To test this, we made use of the mutant aos/dde2, which is completely blocked in its ability to produce JAs because of a mutation in the ALLENE OXIDE SYNTHASE gene. Mutant aos/dde2 plants did not express the JA-responsive marker genes PDF1.2 or VSP2 in response to infection with the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola or the herbivorous insect Pieris rapae. Bypassing JA biosynthesis by exogenous application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) rescued this JA-responsive phenotype in aos/dde2. Application of SA suppressed MeJA-induced PDF1.2 expression to the same level in the aos/dde2 mutant as in wild-type Col-0 plants, indicating that SA-mediated suppression of JAresponsive gene expression is targeted at a position downstream of the JA biosynthesis pathway. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1080 TI - (+)-7-iso-Jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine is the endogenous bioactive jasmonate JO - Nat Chem Biol PY - 2009 SP - 344-350 AU - Fonseca, S. AU - Chini, A. AU - Hamberg, M. AU - Adie, B. AU - Porzel, A. AU - Kramell, R. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Solano, R. VL - 5 UR - http://www.nature.com/nchembio/journal/v5/n5/full/nchembio.161.html DO - 10.1038/nchembio.161 AB - Hormone-triggered activation of the jasmonate signaling pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana requires SCFCOI1-mediated proteasome degradation of JAZ repressors. (-)-JA-L-Ile is the proposed bioactive hormone, and SCFCOI1 is its likely receptor. We found that the biological activity of (-)-JA-L-Ile is unexpectedly low compared to coronatine and the synthetic isomer (+)-JA-L-Ile, which suggests that the stereochemical orientation of the cyclopentanone-ring side chains greatly affects receptor binding. Detailed GC-MS and HPLC analyses showed that the (-)-JA-L-Ile preparations currently used in ligand binding studies contain small amounts of the C7 epimer (+)-7-iso-JA-L-Ile. Purification of each of these molecules demonstrated that pure (-)-JA-L-Ile is inactive and that the active hormone is (+)-7-iso-JA-L-Ile, which is also structurally more similar to coronatine. In addition, we show that pH changes promote conversion of (+)-7-iso-JA-L-Ile to the inactive (-)-JA-L-Ile form, thus providing a simple mechanism that can regulate hormone activity through epimerization. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Bioorganic Chemistry ER - TY - CHAP ID - 1499 TI - Chronobiologische Phänomene und Jasmonatgehalt bei Viscum album L. T2 - Die Mistel in der Tumortherapie 2. Aktueller Stand der Forschung und klinische Anwendung PB - PY - 2009 SP - 49-56 AU - Dorka, R. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Hause, B. AU - Weik, P. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - UR - SN - 978-3-933351-82 AB - A2 - Scheer, R.; Bauer, R.; Bekker, A.; Berg, P. A.; Fintelmann, V. C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1043 TI - Jasmonates act with salicylic acid to confer basal thermotolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana JO - New Phytol PY - 2009 SP - 175-187 AU - Clarke, S.M. AU - Cristescu, S.M. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Harren, F.J.M. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Mur, L.A.J. VL - 182 UR - http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2008.02735.x/abstract DO - 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2008.02735.x AB - The cpr5-1 Arabidopsis thaliana mutant exhibits constitutive activation of salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) signalling pathways and displays enhanced tolerance of heat stress (HS). cpr5-1 crossed with jar1-1 (a JA-amino acid synthetase) was compromised in basal thermotolerance, as were the mutants opr3 (mutated in OPDA reductase3) and coi1-1 (affected in an E3 ubiquitin ligase F-box; a key JA-signalling component). In addition, heating wild-type Arabidopsis led to the accumulation of a range of jasmonates: JA, 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA) and a JA-isoleucine (JA-Ile) conjugate. Exogenous application of methyl jasmonate protected wild-type Arabidopsis from HS. Ethylene was rapidly produced during HS, with levels being modulated by both JA and SA. By contrast, the ethylene mutant ein2-1 conferred greater thermotolerance. These data suggest that JA acts with SA, conferring basal thermotolerance while ET may act to promote cell death. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1125 TI - Agrobacterium tumefaciens Promotes Tumor Induction by Modulating Pathogen Defense in Arabidopsis thaliana JO - Plant Cell PY - 2009 SP - 2948 - 2962 AU - Lee, C-W. AU - Efetova, M. AU - Engelmann, J.C. AU - Kramell, R. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Ludwig- Müller, J. AU - Hedrich, R. AU - Deeken, R. VL - 21 UR - http://www.plantcell.org/ DO - 10.1105/tpc.108.064576 AB - Agrobacterium tumefaciens causes crown gall disease by transferring and integrating bacterial DNA (T-DNA) into the plant genome. To examine the physiological changes and adaptations during Agrobacterium-induced tumor development, we compared the profiles of salicylic acid (SA), ethylene (ET), jasmonic acid (JA), and auxin (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) with changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana transcriptome. Our data indicate that host responses were much stronger toward the oncogenic strain C58 than to the disarmed strain GV3101 and that auxin acts as a key modulator of the Arabidopsis–Agrobacterium interaction. At initiation of infection, elevated levels of IAA and ET were associated with the induction of host genes involved in IAA, but not ET signaling. After T-DNA integration, SA as well as IAA and ET accumulated, but JA did not.This did not correlate with SA-controlled pathogenesis-related gene expression in the host, although high SA levels in mutant plants prevented tumor development, while low levels promoted it. Our data are consistent with a scenario in which ET and later on SA control virulence of agrobacteria, whereas ET and auxin stimulate neovascularization during tumor formation. We suggest that crosstalk among IAA, ET, and SA balances pathogen defense launched by the host and tumorgrowth initiated by agrobacteria. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1042 TI - ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase-deficient pea embryos reveal specific transcriptional and metabolic changes of carbon-nitrogen metabolism and stress responses JO - Plant Physiol PY - 2009 SP - 395-411 AU - Weigelt, K. AU - Küster, H. AU - Rutten, T. AU - Fait, A. AU - Fernie, A.R. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Emery, R.J.N. AU - Desel, C. AU - Hosein, F. AU - Müller, M. AU - Saalbach, I. AU - Weber, H. VL - 149 UR - DO - 10.1104/pp.108.129940 AB - We present a comprehensive analysis of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP)-repressed pea (Pisum sativum) seeds using transcript and metabolite profiling to monitor the effects that reduced carbon flow into starch has on carbon-nitrogen metabolism and related pathways. Changed patterns of transcripts and metabolites suggest that AGP repression causes sugar accumulation and stimulates carbohydrate oxidation via glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, and mitochondrial respiration. Enhanced provision of precursors such as acetyl-coenzyme A and organic acids apparently support other pathways and activate amino acid and storage protein biosynthesis as well as pathways fed by cytosolic acetyl-coenzyme A, such as cysteine biosynthesis and fatty acid elongation/metabolism. As a consequence, the resulting higher nitrogen (N) demand depletes transient N storage pools, specifically asparagine and arginine, and leads to N limitation. Moreover, increased sugar accumulation appears to stimulate cytokinin-mediated cell proliferation pathways. In addition, the deregulation of starch biosynthesis resulted in indirect changes, such as increased mitochondrial metabolism and osmotic stress. The combined effect of these changes is an enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species coupled with an up-regulation of energy-dissipating, reactive oxygen species protection, and defense genes. Transcriptional activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and oxylipin synthesis indicates an additional activation of stress signaling pathways. AGP-repressed embryos contain higher levels of jasmonate derivatives; however, this increase is preferentially in nonactive forms. The results suggest that, although metabolic/osmotic alterations in iAGP pea seeds result in multiple stress responses, pea seeds have effective mechanisms to circumvent stress signaling under conditions in which excessive stress responses and/or cellular damage could prematurely initiate senescence or apoptosis. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1079 TI - Disruption of Adenosine-5'-Phosphosulfate Kinase in Arabidopsis Reduces Levels of Sulfated Secondary Metabolites JO - Plant Cell PY - 2009 SP - 910-927 AU - Mugford, S.G. AU - Yoshimoto, N. AU - Reichelt, M. AU - Wirtz, M. AU - Hill, L. AU - Mugford, S.T. AU - Nakazato, Y. AU - Noji, M. AU - Takahashi, H. AU - Kramell, R. AU - Gigolashvili, T. AU - Flügge, U.-I. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Gershenzon, J. AU - Hell, R. AU - Saito, K. AU - Kopriva, S. VL - 21 UR - DO - 10.1105/tpc.109.065581 AB - Plants can metabolize sulfate by two pathways, which branch at the level of adenosine 59-phosphosulfate (APS). APS can be reduced to sulfide and incorporated into Cys in the primary sulfate assimilation pathway or phosphorylated by APS kinase to 39-phosphoadenosine 59-phosphosulfate, which is the activated sulfate form for sulfation reactions. To assess to what extent APS kinase regulates accumulation of sulfated compounds, we analyzed the corresponding gene family in Arabidopsis thaliana. Analysis of T-DNA insertion knockout lines for each of the four isoforms did not reveal any phenotypical alterations. However, when all six combinations of double mutants were compared, the apk1 apk2 plants were significantly smaller than wild-type plants. The levels of glucosinolates, a major class of sulfated secondary metabolites, and the sulfated 12-hydroxyjasmonate were reduced approximately fivefold in apk1 apk2 plants. Although auxin levels were increased in the apk1 apk2 mutants, as is the case for most plants with compromised glucosinolate synthesis, typical high auxin phenotypes were not observed. The reduction in glucosinolates resulted in increased transcript levels for genes involved in glucosinolate biosynthesis and accumulation of desulfated precursors. It also led to great alterations in sulfur metabolism: the levels of sulfate and thiols increased in the apk1 apk2 plants. The data indicate that the APK1 and APK2 isoforms of APS kinase play a major role in the synthesis of secondary sulfated metabolites and are required for normalgrowth rates. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1087 TI - Spodoptera littoralis-Induced Lectin Expression in Tobacco JO - Plant Cell Physiol PY - 2009 SP - 1142-1155 AU - Vandenborre, G. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Hause, B. AU - Smagghe, G. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Van Damme, E.J.M. VL - 50 UR - 10.1093/pcp/pcp065 DO - 10.1093/pcp/pcp065 AB - The induced defense response in plants towards herbivores is mainly regulated by jasmonates and leads to the accumulation of so-called jasmonate-induced proteins. Recently, a jasmonate (JA) inducible lectin called Nicotiana tabacum agglutinin or NICTABA was discovered in tobacco( N. tabacum cv Samsun) leaves. Tobacco plants also accumulate the lectin after insect attack by caterpillars. To study the functional role of NICTABA, the accumulation of the JA precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA), JA as well as different JA metabolites were analyzed in tobacco leaves after herbivory by larvae of the cotton leafworm ( Spodoptera littoralis ) and correlated with NICTABA accumulation. It was shown that OPDA, JA as well as its methyl ester can trigger NICTABA accumulation. However, hydroxylation of JA and its subsequent sulfation and glucosylation results in inactive compounds that have lost the capacity to induce NICTABA gene expression. The expression profi le of NICTABA after caterpillar feeding was recorded in local as well as in systemic leaves, and compared to the expression of several genes encodingdefense proteins, and genes encoding a tobacco systemin and the allene oxide cyclase, an enzyme in JA biosynthesis. Furthermore, the accumulation of NICTABA was quantified after S. littoralis herbivory and immunofl uorescence microscopy was used to study the localization of NICTABA in the tobacco leaf. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - JOUR ID - 984 TI - The AOC promoter of tomato is regulated by developmental and environmental stimuli JO - Phytochemistry PY - 2008 SP - 1859-1869 AU - Stenzel, I. AU - Hause, B. AU - Proels, R. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Oka, M. AU - Roitsch, T. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 69 UR - DO - 10.1016/j.phytochem.2008.03.007 AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1027 TI - Multifunctional enzymes in oxylipin metabolism JO - Chembiochem. PY - 2008 SP - 2373-2375 AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Feussner, I. VL - 9 UR - DO - 10.1002/cbic.200800582 AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1018 TI - Glutaminyl cyclases from animals and plants: a case of functionally convergent protein evolution JO - Biol. Chem PY - 2008 SP - 983-991 AU - Schilling, S. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Demuth, H.U. VL - 389 UR - DO - 10.1515/BC.2008.111 AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 983 TI - Reduced V-ATPase Activity in the trans-Golgi Network Causes Oxylipin-Dependent Hypocotyl Growth Inhibition in Arabidopsis JO - The Plant Cell PY - 2008 SP - 1088-1100 AU - Brüx, A. AU - Liu, T-Y. AU - Krebs, M. AU - Stierhof, Y.-D. AU - Lohmann, J.U. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Schumacher, K. VL - 20 UR - DO - 10.1105/tpc.108.058362 AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 980 TI - Jasmonates meet fatty acids: functional analysis of a new acyl-coenzyme A synthetase family from Arabidopsis thaliana JO - J. Exp. Bot. PY - 2008 SP - 403-419 AU - Kienow, L. AU - Schneider, K. AU - Bartsch, M. AU - Stuible, H.-P. AU - Weng, H. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Kombrink, E. VL - 59 (2) UR - DO - 10.1093/jxb/erm325 AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 943 TI - Hydroxylated jasmonates are commonly occurring metabolites of jasmonic acid and contribute to a partial switch-off in jasmonate signaling JO - New Phytologist PY - 2008 SP - 114-127 AU - Miersch, O. AU - Neumerkel, J. AU - Dippe, M. AU - Stenzel, I. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 177 UR - DO - 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2007.02252.x AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 944 TI - Obituary - Clarence A. Bud Ryan (29.09.1931-07.10.2007) JO - Plant Mol. Biol. PY - 2007 SP - 709 AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 65 UR - DO - 10.1007/s11103-007-9254-8 AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 942 TI - Chronobiological phenomena and seasonal changes in jasmonate levels during the course of the year and under constant conditions in mistletoe (Viscum album L.) JO - Phytomedicine PY - 2007 SP - 15 AU - Dorka, R. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Weik, P. VL - 14 UR - DO - 10.1016/j.phymed.2007.07.014 AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 891 TI - The Jasmonate-Induced Expression of the Nicotiana tabacum Leaf Lectin JO - Plant and Cell Physiol. PY - 2007 SP - 1207-1218 AU - Lannoo, N. AU - Vandenborre, G. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Smagghe, G. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Peumans, W.J. AU - Van Damme, E.J.M. VL - 48 UR - DO - 10.1093/pcp/pcm090 AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 878 TI - Jasmonates: An update on biosynthesis, signal transduction and action in plant stress response, growth and development JO - Annals of Botany PY - 2007 SP - 681-697 AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 100 UR - DO - 10.1093/aob/mcm079 AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 877 TI - Jasmonate biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana requires peroxisomal β-oxidation enzymes – Additional proof by properties of pex6 and aim1 JO - Phytochemistry PY - 2007 SP - 1642-1650 AU - Delker, C. AU - Zolman, B.K. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 68 UR - DO - 10.1016/j.phytochem.2007.04.024 AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 831 TI - Isolation and characterization of the glutaminyl cyclases from Solanum tuberosum and Arabidopsis thaliana: implications for physiological functions JO - Biol. Chem PY - 2007 SP - 145-153 AU - Schilling, S. AU - Stenzel, I. AU - von Bohlen, A. AU - Wermann, M. AU - Schulz, K. AU - Demuth, H.-U. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 388 UR - DO - 10.1515/BC.2007.016 AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 845 TI - Substrate specificity and products of side-reactions catalyzed by jasmonate:amino acid synthetase (JAR1) JO - FEBS Letters PY - 2007 SP - 815-820 AU - Guranowski, A. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Staswick, P.E. AU - Suza, W. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 581 UR - DO - 10.1016/j.febslet.2007.01.049 AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 781 TI - Jasmonate Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana - Enzymes, Products, Regulation JO - Plant Biol. PY - 2006 SP - 297-306 AU - Delker, C. AU - Stenzel, I. AU - Hause, B. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Feussner, I. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 8 UR - http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1055/s-2006-923935/abstract DO - 10.1055/s-2006-923935 AB - Among the plant hormones jasmonic acid and related derivatives are known to mediate stress responses and several developmental processes. Biosynthesis, regulation, and metabolism of jasmonic acid in Arabidopsis thaliana are reviewed, including properties of mutants of jasmonate biosynthesis. The individual signalling properties of several jasmonates are described. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - JOUR ID - 700 TI - Transgenic barley plants overexpressing a 13-lipoxygenase to modify oxylipin signature JO - Phytochemistry PY - 2006 SP - 264-276 AU - Sharma, V.K. AU - Monostori, T. AU - Göbel, C. AU - Hänsch, R. AU - Bittner, F. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Feussner, I. AU - Mendel, R.R. AU - Hause, B. AU - Schulze, J. VL - 67 UR - DO - 10.1016/j.phytochem.2005.11.009 AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - JOUR ID - 701 TI - The wound response in tomato - Role of jasmonic acid JO - J. Plant Physiol PY - 2006 SP - 297-306 AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Stenzel, I. AU - Hause, B. AU - Hause, G. AU - Kutter, C. AU - Maucher, H. AU - Neumerkel, J. AU - Feussner, I. AU - Miersch, O. VL - 163 UR - DO - 10.1016/j.jplph.2005.10.014 AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - JOUR ID - 792 TI - Interaction between nitric oxide and ethylene in the induction of alternative oxidase in ozone-treated tobacco plants JO - Plant Physiol. PY - 2006 SP - 595-608 AU - Ederli, L. AU - Morettini, R. AU - Borgogni, A. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Reale, L. AU - Ferranti, F. AU - Tosit, N. AU - Pasqualini, S. VL - 142 UR - DO - 10.1104/pp.106.085472 AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - CHAP ID - 780 TI - Oxilipins: biosynthesis, signal transduction and action T2 - Plant Hormone Signaling PB - Ann. Plant Reviews, Blackwell, Oxford, UK PY - 2006 SP - 185-228 AU - Wasternack, C. VL - UR - DO - 10.1002/9780470988800.ch7 AB - A2 - Hedden, P., Thomas, S. C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 696 TI - The outcomes of concentration specific interactions between salicylate and jasmonate signaling include synergy, antagonism and the activation of cell death JO - Plant Physiol. PY - 2006 SP - 249-262 AU - Mur, L.A.J. AU - Kenton, P. AU - Atzorn, R. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 140 UR - DO - 10.1104/pp.105.072348 AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 699 TI - Genetic transformation of barley to modify expression of a 13-lipoxygenase JO - Acta Biol. Szeged PY - 2005 SP - 33-34 AU - Sharma, V.K. AU - Monostori, T. AU - Hause, B. AU - Maucher, H. AU - Göbel, C. AU - Hornung, E. AU - Hänsch, R. AU - Bittner, F. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Feussner, I. AU - Mendel, R.R. AU - Schulze, J. VL - 49 UR - http://www2.sci.u-szeged.hu/ABS/2005/Acta%20HP/4933.pdf AB - Immature scutella of barley were transformed with cDNA coding for a 13-li-poxygenase of barley (LOX-100) via particle bombardment. Regenerated plants were tested by PAT-assay, Western-analysis and PCR-screening. Immunocytochemical assay of T0 plants showed expression of the LOX cDNA both in the chloroplasts and in the cytosol, depending on the presence of the chloroplast signal peptide sequences in the cDNA. A few transgenic plants containing higher amounts of LOX-derived products have been found. These are the candidates for further analysis concerning pathogen resistance. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - JOUR ID - 432 TI - Lipoxygenase-mediated metabolism of storage lipids in germinating sunflower cotyledons and b-oxidation of (9Z,11E,13S)-13-hydroxy-octadeca-9,11-dienoic acid by the cotyledonary glyoxysomes JO - Planta PY - 2005 SP - 919-930 AU - Gerhard, B. AU - Fischer, K. AU - Balkenhohl, T.J. AU - Pohnert, G. AU - Kühn, H. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Feussner, I. VL - 220 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 433 TI - A new type of peroxisomal acyl-coenzyme A synthetase from Arabidopsis thaliana has the catalytic capacity of activate biosynthetic precursors of jasmonic acid JO - J. Biol. Chem. PY - 2005 SP - 13962-13972 AU - Schneider, K. AU - Kienow, L. AU - Schmelzer, E. AU - Colby, T. AU - Bartsch, M. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Kombrink, E. AU - Stuible, H.-P. VL - 280 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 691 TI - Expression of allene oxide cyclase and accumulation of jasmonates during organogenic nodule formation from hop (Humulus lupulus var. Nugget) internodes JO - Plant Cell Physiol. PY - 2005 SP - 1713-23 AU - Fortes, A.M. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Lange, P.R. AU - Malho, R. AU - Testillano, P.S. AU - del Risueno, M.C. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Pais, M.S. VL - 46 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 694 TI - Changes in jasmonates and 12-oxophytodienoic acid contents of Medicago sativa L. during somatic embryogenesis JO - Acta Physiol. Plantar. PY - 2005 SP - 497-504 AU - Rudus, I. AU - Kepczynska, E. AU - Kepczynski, J. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Miersch, O. VL - 27 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 542 TI - Ethylene-mediated cross-talk between calcium-dependent protein kinase and MAPK signaling controls stress responses in plants JO - PNAS PY - 2005 SP - 10736-10741 AU - Ludwig, A.A. AU - Saitoh, H. AU - Felix, G. AU - Freymark, G. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Boller, T. AU - Jones, J.D.G. AU - Romeis, T. VL - 102 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Biochemistry of Plant Interactions ER - TY - JOUR ID - 253 TI - Coronalon: a powerful tool in plant stress physiology JO - FEBS Lett. PY - 2004 SP - 17-22 AU - Schüler, G. AU - Mithöfer, A. AU - Baldwin, I.T. AU - Berger, S. AU - Ebel, S. AU - Santos, J.G. AU - Herrmann, G. AU - Hölscher, D. AU - Kramell, R. AU - Kutchan, T.M. AU - Maucher, H. AU - Schneider, B. AU - Stenzel, I. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Boland, W. VL - 563 UR - http://febs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/hub/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1873-3468/issues/ DO - 10.1016/S0014-5793(04)00239-X AB - Coronalon, a synthetic 6-ethyl indanoyl isoleucine conjugate, has been designed as a highly active mimic of octadecanoid phytohormones that are involved in insect and disease resistance. The spectrum of biological activities that is affected by coronalon was investigated in nine different plant systems specifically responding to jasmonates and/or 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid. In all bioassays analyzed, coronalon demonstrated a general strong activity at low micromolar concentrations. The results obtained showed the induction of (i) defense-related secondary metabolite accumulation in both cell cultures and plant tissues, (ii) specific abiotic and biotic stress-related gene expression, and (iii) root growth retardation. The general activity of coronalon in the induction of plant stress responses together with its simple and efficient synthesis suggests that this compound might serve as a valuable tool in the examination of various aspects in plant stress physiology. Moreover, coronalon might become employed in agriculture to elicit plant resistance against various aggressors. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 430 TI - Jasmonates - Introductory remarks on biosynthesis and diversity in action JO - J. Plant Growth Reg. PY - 2004 SP - 167-169 AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 23 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 369 TI - Wound induced RNaseLE expression is jasmonate and systemin independent and occurs only locally in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Lukullus) JO - Phytochemistry PY - 2004 SP - 1343-1350 AU - Groß, N. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Köck, M. VL - 65 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - CHAP ID - 431 TI - Jasmonates - Biosynthesis and role in stress responses and developmental processes T2 - Programmed Cell Death and Related Processes in Plants PB - Academic Press, New York PY - 2004 SP - 143-154 AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 0 UR - AB - A2 - Nooden, L.D. C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 371 TI - The allene oxide cyclase of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) - cloning and organ-specific expression JO - Phytochemistry PY - 2004 SP - 801-811 AU - Maucher, H. AU - Stenzel, I. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Stein, N. AU - Prasad, M. AU - Zierold, U. AU - Schweizer, P. AU - Dorer, C. AU - Hause, B. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 65 UR - DO - 10.1016/j.phytochem.2004.01.009 AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - CHAP ID - 426 TI - Transcriptional activation of jasmonate biosynthesis enzymes is not reflected at protein level T2 - Advanced Research on Plant Lipids PB - Kluwer Academic Publishers PY - 2003 SP - 267-270 AU - Stenzel, I. AU - Hause, B. AU - Feussner, I. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 0 UR - AB - A2 - Murata, N., Yamada, M., Nishida, I., Okuyama, H., Sekijar, J., Hajme, W. C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - JOUR ID - 360 TI - Biochemical and molecular characterization of a hydroxy-jasmonate sulfotransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana JO - J. Biol. Chem. PY - 2003 SP - 17895-17900 AU - Gidda, K.S. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Schmidt, J. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Varin, L. VL - 278 UR - http://www.jbc.org/content/by/year DO - 10.1074/jbc.M211943200 AB - 12-Hydroxyjasmonate, also known as tuberonic acid, was first isolated from Solanum tuberosum and was shown to have tuber-inducing properties. It is derived from the ubiquitously occurring jasmonic acid, an important signaling molecule mediating diverse developmental processes and plant defense responses. We report here that the gene AtST2a from Arabidopsis thaliana encodes a hydroxyjasmonate sulfotransferase. The recombinant AtST2a protein was found to exhibit strict specificity for 11- and 12-hydroxyjasmonate with Km values of 50 and 10 µM, respectively. Furthermore, 12-hydroxyjasmonate and its sulfonated derivative are shown to be naturally occurring in A. thaliana. The exogenous application of methyljasmonate to A. thaliana plants led to increased levels of both metabolites, whereas treatment with 12-hydroxyjasmonate led to increased level of 12-hydroxyjasmonate sulfate without affecting the endogenous level of jasmonic acid. AtST2a expression was found to be induced following treatment with methyljasmonate and 12-hydroxyjasmonate. In contrast, the expression of the methyljasmonate-responsive gene Thi2.1, a marker gene in plant defense responses, is not induced upon treatment with 12-hydroxyjasmonate indicating the existence of independent signaling pathways responding to jasmonic acid and 12-hydroxyjasmonic acid. Taken together, the results suggest that the hydroxylation and sulfonation reactions might be components of a pathway that inactivates excess jasmonic acid in plants. Alternatively, the function of AtST2a might be to control the biological activity of 12-hydroxyjasmonic acid. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Bioorganic Chemistry ER - TY - JOUR ID - 367 TI - Multiple hormones cooperatively control a susceptible tomato pathogen defense response JO - Plant Physiol. PY - 2003 SP - 1181-1189 AU - O'Donnell, P.J. AU - Schmelz, E. AU - Block, A. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Jones, J.B. AU - Klee, H.J. VL - 133 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 425 TI - Identification of human glutaminyl cyclase as a metalloenzyme - Potent inhibition by imidazole derivatives and heterocyclic chelators JO - J. Biol. Chem. PY - 2003 SP - 49773-49779 AU - Schilling, S. AU - Niestroj, A.J. AU - Rahfeld, J.-U. AU - Hoffmann, T. AU - Wermann, M. AU - Zunkel, K. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Demuth, H.-U. VL - 278 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 424 TI - Substrate specificity of glutaminyl cyclases from plants and animals JO - Biol. Chem. PY - 2003 SP - 1583-1592 AU - Schilling, S. AU - Manhart, S. AU - Hoffmann, T. AU - Ludwig, H.-H. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Demuth, H.-U. VL - 384 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - CHAP ID - 428 TI - Shift in fatty acid and oxylipin pattern of tomato leaves following overexpression of the allene oxide cyclase T2 - Advanced Research on Plant Lipids PB - Kluwer Academic Publishers PY - 2003 SP - 275-278 AU - Weichert, H. AU - Maucher, H. AU - Hornung, E. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Feussner, I. VL - 0 UR - AB - A2 - Murata, N., Yamada, M., Nishida, I., Okuyama, H., Sekijar, J., Hajme, W. C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - CHAP ID - 457 TI - Jasmonates and octadecanoids: Signals in plant stress responses and development T2 - Progress in Nucleic Acid Research and Molecular Biology PB - PY - 2002 SP - 165-221 AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Hause, B. VL - 72 UR - DO - 10.1016/S0079-6603(02)72070-9 AB - A2 - Moldave, K. C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - CHAP ID - 423 TI - Signal transduction in plants: Cross-talk with the environment T2 - Plant Signal Transduction PB - University Press, Oxford, UK PY - 2002 SP - 1-5 AU - Scheel, D. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 0 UR - AB - A2 - Scheel, D., Wasternack, C. C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Stress and Developmental Biology ER - TY - JOUR ID - 353 TI - Heterologous expression and characterization of human glutaminyl cyclase: evidence for a disulfide bond with importance for catalytic activity JO - Biochemistry PY - 2002 SP - 10849-10857 AU - Schilling, S. AU - Hoffmann, T. AU - Rosche, F. AU - Manhart, S. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Demuth, H.-U. VL - 41 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 357 TI - Metabolic profiling of oxylipins in germinating cucumber seedlings - lipoxygenase-dependent degradation of triacylglycerols and biosynthesis of volatile aldehydes JO - Planta PY - 2002 SP - 612-619 AU - Weichert, H. AU - Kolbe, A. AU - Kraus, A. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Feussner, I. VL - 215 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 350 TI - The lipoxygenase pathway JO - Annu. Rev. Plant Biol. PY - 2002 SP - 275-297 AU - Feussner, I. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 53 UR - AB - Lipid peroxidation is common to all biological systems, both appearing in developmentally and environmentally regulated processes of plants. The hydroperoxy polyunsaturated fatty acids, synthesized by the action of various highly specialized forms of lipoxygenases, are substrates of at least seven different enzyme families. Signaling compounds such as jasmonates, antimicrobial and antifungal compounds such as leaf aldehydes or divinyl ethers, and a plant-specific blend of volatiles including leaf alcohols are among the numerous products. Cloning of many lipoxygenases and other key enzymes within the lipoxygenase pathway, as well as analyses by reverse genetic and metabolic profiling, revealed new reactions and the first hints of enzyme mechanisms, multiple functions, and regulation. These aspects are reviewed with respect to activation of this pathway as an initial step in the interaction of plants with pathogens, insects, or abiotic stress and at distinct stages of development. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 349 TI - The Arabidopsis mutant cev1 links cell wall signaling to jasmonate and ethylene responses JO - The Plant Cell PY - 2002 SP - 1557-1566 AU - Ellis, C. AU - Karafyllidis, I. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Turner, J.G. VL - 14 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 354 TI - Continuous spectrometric assays for glutaminyl cyclase activity JO - Analytical Biochemistry PY - 2002 SP - 49-56 AU - Schilling, S. AU - Hoffmann, T. AU - Wermann, M. AU - Heiser, U. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Demuth, H.-U. VL - 303 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 352 TI - Cell death and salicylate- and jasmonate-dependent stress responses in Arabidopsis are controlled by single cet genes JO - Planta PY - 2002 SP - 120-128 AU - Nibbe, M. AU - Hilpert, B. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Apel, K. VL - 216 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 345 TI - Lipids and signalling: oxylipins 3 - functional aspects JO - Biochem. Soc. Trans. PY - 2001 SP - 861-862 AU - Weichert, H. AU - Kohlmann, M. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Feussner, I. VL - 28 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 343 TI - The lipoxygenase dependent degradation of storage lipids JO - Trends Plant Sci. PY - 2001 SP - 268-273 AU - Feussner, I. AU - Kühn, H. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 6 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 342 TI - Enzymatic and non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation in leaf development JO - Biochim. Biophys. Acta PY - 2001 SP - 266-276 AU - Berger, S. AU - Weichert, H. AU - Porzel, A. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Kühn, H. AU - Feussner, I. VL - 1533 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 346 TI - Formation of 4-hydroxy-1-alkenals in barley leaves JO - Biochem. Soc. Trans. PY - 2001 SP - 850-851 AU - Weichert, H. AU - Kolbe, A. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Feussner, I. VL - 28 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 97 TI - Molecular cloning of allene oxide cyclase: The enzyme establishing the stereochemistry of octadecanoids and jasmonates JO - J. Biol. Chem. PY - 2000 SP - 19132-19138 AU - Ziegler, J. AU - Stenzel, I. AU - Hause, B. AU - Maucher, H. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Hamberg, M. AU - Grimm, M. AU - Ganal, M. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 275 UR - http://www.jbc.org/content/275/25/19132.abstract?sid=04f09be3-5f6e-4d78-aa97-a7b681940e00 DO - 10.1074/jbc.M002133200 AB - Allene oxide cyclase (AOC) catalyses the stereospecific cyclisation of an unstable allene oxide to 9(S),13(S)-12-oxo-10,15(Z)-phytodienoic acid, the ultimate precursor of jasmonic acid. This enzyme has previously been purified, and two identical N-terminal peptides were found suggesting AOC to be a homodimeric protein. Furthermore, the native protein was N-terminal processed. Using degenerate primers, a PCR fragment could be generated from tomato, which was further used to isolate a full length cDNA clone of 1kb coding for a protein with 245 amino acids with a molecular mass of 26 kDa. Whereas expression of the whole coding region failed to detect AOC activity, a 5-'truncated protein showed high activity, suggesting that additional amino acids impair the enzymatic function. Steric analysis of the 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid formed by the recombinant AOC revealed exclusive (>99%) formation of the 9(S),13(S) enantiomer. Exclusive formation of this enantiomer was also found in wounded tomato leaves. Southern analysis and genetic mapping revealed the existence of a single gene for AOC located on chromosome 2 of tomato. Inspection of the N-terminus revealed the presence of a chloroplastic transit peptide, and the location of AOC protein in that compartment could be shown by immunohistochemical methods. Concomitant with the jasmonate levels, the accumulation of AOC mRNA was transiently induced after wounding of tomato leaves. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - JOUR ID - 339 TI - Octadecanoid and jasmonate signaling in tomato leaves (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.): Endogenous jasmonates do not induce jasmonate biosynthesis JO - Biol. Chem. PY - 2000 SP - 715-722 AU - Miersch, O. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 381 UR - AB - Jasmonates and their precursors, the octadecanoids, are signals in stress-induced alteration of gene expression. Several mRNAs coding for enzymes of jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis are up-regulated upon JA treatment or endogenous rise of JA level. Here we inspected the positive feed back of endogenous JA on JA formation as well as its beta-oxidation steps. JA responsive gene expression was recorded in terms of proteinase inhibitor2 (pin2) mRNA accumulation. JA formed upon treatment of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Moneymaker) leaves with JA derivatives carrying different length of the carboxylic acid side chain was quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The data reveal that beta-oxidation of the side chain occurs up to a butyric acid moiety. The amount of JA formed from side-chain modified JA derivatives, correlated with pin2-mRNA accumulation. JA derivatives with a carboxylic side chain of 3, 5 or 7 carbon atoms were unable to form JA and to express on pin2, whereas even numbered derivatives were active. After treatment of tomato leaves with (10-2H)-(-)-12-oxophytoenoic acid, (4-2H)-(-)-JA and its methyl ester were formed and could be quantified separately from the endogenously unlabeled JA pool by GC-MS analysis via isotopic discrimination. The level of 8 nmol per g f.w. JA and its methyl ester originated exclusively from labeled 12-oxophytoenic acid. This and further data indicate that endogenous synthesis of the JA precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid as well as of JA and its methyl ester are not induced in tomato leaves, suggesting that positive feedback in JA biosynthesis does not function in vivo. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 337 TI - Octadecanoid-derived alteration of gene expression and the 'oxylipin signature' in stressed barley leaves - implications for different signalling pathways JO - Plant Physiol. PY - 2000 SP - 177-186 AU - Kramell, R. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Atzorn, R. AU - Parthier, B. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 123 UR - AB - Stress-induced gene expression in barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Salome) leaves has been correlated with temporally changing levels of octadecanoids and jasmonates, quantified by means of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-single ion monitoring. Application of sorbitol-induced stress led to a low and transient rise of jasmonic acid (JA), its precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA) and the methyl esters JAME and OPDAME, respectively, followed by a large increase in their levels. JA and JAME peaked between 12 and 16 h, about 4 hours before OPDA and OPDAME. However, OPDA accumulated up to a 2.5-fold higher level than the other compounds. Dihomo-jasmonic acid and 9,13-didehydro-12- oxophytoenoic acid were identified as minor components. Kinetic analyses revealed that a transient threshold of jasmonates or octadecanoids is necessary and sufficient to initiate JA responsive gene expression. Although OPDA and OPDAME applied exogenously were metabolized to JA in considerable amounts, both of them can induce gene expression per se as evidenced by those genes which do not respond to endogenously formed JA. Also, coronatine induces JA-responsive genes independently from endogenous JA. As evidenced by application of deuterated JA, endogenous synthesis of JA is not induced by JA treatment. The data are discussed in terms of distinct signalling pathways. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 340 TI - Jasmonate - Signale zur Stressabwehr und Entwicklung in Pflanzen JO - Biologie in unserer Zeit PY - 2000 SP - 312-319 AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Hause, B. VL - 30 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 420 TI - (—)-Jasmonic Acid Accumulation in Tobacco Hypersensitive Response Lesions JO - Mol. Plant Microbiol. Interactions PY - 1999 SP - 74-78 AU - Kenton, P. AU - Mur, L.A.J. AU - Atzorn, R. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Draper, J. VL - 12 UR - http://apsjournals.apsnet.org/loi/mpmi?open=1999 DO - 10.1094/MPMI.1999.12.1.74 AB - Tobacco infected with Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola undergoes a hypersensitive response (HR). Jasmonic acid (JA) accumulated within the developing lesion 3 to 9 h after infection and this accumulation preceded protein loss, cell death, and malondialdehyde accumulation. Accumulating JA consisted largely of the (—)-JA stereoisomer and was essentially restricted to the HR lesion A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 421 TI - Liquid chromatography of jasmonic acid amine conjugates JO - Chromatographia PY - 1999 SP - 42-46 AU - Kramell, R. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Schneider, G. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 49 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 422 TI - Jasmonates and related compounds form Fusarium oxysporum JO - Phytochemistry PY - 1999 SP - 517-523 AU - Miersch, O. AU - Bohlmann, H. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 50 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 331 TI - Structure-activity relations of substituted, deleted or stereospecifically altered jasmonic acid in gene expression of barley leaves JO - Phytochemistry PY - 1999 SP - 353-361 AU - Miersch, O. AU - Kramell, R. AU - Parthier, B. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 50 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 419 TI - Electric signaling and PIN2 gene expression on different abiotic stimuli depend on a distinct threshold level of endogenous ABA in several ABA-deficient tomato mutants JO - Plant Physiol. PY - 1999 SP - 213-218 AU - Herde, O. AU - Peña-Cortés, H. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Willmitzer, L. AU - Fisahn, J. VL - 119 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 406 TI - Lipoxygenase catalyzed oxygenation of lipids JO - Fett/Lipid PY - 1998 SP - 146-152 AU - Feussner, I. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 100 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 407 TI - A jasmonic acid conjugate, N-[()-jasmonoyl]-tyramine, from Petunia pollen JO - Phytochemistry PY - 1998 SP - 327-329 AU - Miersch, O. AU - Knöfel, H.-D. AU - Schmidt, J. AU - Kramell, R. AU - Parthier, B. VL - 47 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - CHAP ID - 413 TI - A lipase specific for esterified oxygenated polyenoic fatty acids in lipid bodies of cucumber cotyledons T2 - Advances in Plant Lipid Research PB - Secretariado de Publicaciones de la Universidad de Sevilla PY - 1998 SP - 320-322 AU - Balkenhohl, T. AU - Kühn, H. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Feussner, I. VL - 0 UR - AB - A2 - Sánchez, J., Cerdá-Olmedo, E., Martínez-Force, E. C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 404 TI - Wounding and chemicals induce expression of the Arabidopsis gene Thi2.1, encoding a fungal defense thionin, via the octadecanoid pathway JO - FEBS Letters PY - 1998 SP - 281-286 AU - Bohlmann, H. AU - Vignutelli, A. AU - Hilpert, B. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Apel, K. VL - 437 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 409 TI - Systemic and local induction of an Arabidopsis thionin gene by wounding and pathogens JO - The Plant J. PY - 1998 SP - 285-295 AU - Vignutelli, A. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Apel, K. AU - Bohlmann, H. VL - 14 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - CHAP ID - 415 TI - Structural elucidation of oxygenated triacylglycerols in cucumber and sunflower cotyledons T2 - Natural Product Analysis PB - P. Vieweg, Wiesbaden PY - 1998 SP - 57-58 AU - Feussner, I. AU - Balkenhohl, T. AU - Porzel, A. AU - Kühn, H. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 0 UR - AB - A2 - Schreier, P., Herderich, M., Humpf, H.-U., Schwab, W. C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - CHAP ID - 412 TI - Oxylipins in sorbitol-stressed barley leaf segments T2 - Advances in Plant Lipid Research PB - Secretariado de Publicaciones de la Universidad de Sevilla PY - 1998 SP - 288-290 AU - Bachmann, A. AU - Kohlmann, M. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Feussner, I. VL - 0 UR - AB - A2 - Sánchez, J., Cerdá-Olmedo, E., Martínez-Force, E. C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - CHAP ID - 414 TI - Fatty acid catabolism at the lipid body membrane of germinating cucumber cotyledons T2 - Advances in Plant Lipid Research PB - Secretariado de Publicaciones de la Universidad de Sevilla PY - 1998 SP - 311-313 AU - Feussner, I. AU - Blée, E. AU - Weichert, H. AU - Rousset, C. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 0 UR - AB - A2 - Sánchez, J., Cerdá-Olmedo, E., Martínez-Force, E. C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - CHAP ID - 416 TI - Effect of jasmonic acid methyl ester on enzymes of the lipoxygenase pathway in barley leaves T2 - Natural Product Analysis PB - P. Vieweg, Wiesbaden PY - 1998 SP - 339-340 AU - Kohlmann, M. AU - Kuntzsch, A. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Feussner, I. VL - 0 UR - AB - A2 - Schreier, P., Herderich, M., Humpf, H.-U., Schwab, W. C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 332 TI - Characterization of methyljasmonate-inducible lipoxygenase from barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Salome) leaves JO - Eur. J. Biochem. PY - 1998 SP - 36-44 AU - Vörös, K. AU - Feussner, I. AU - Kühn, H. AU - Lee, J. AU - Graner, A. AU - Löbler, M. AU - Parthier, B. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 251 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 395 TI - In barley leaf cells, jasmonates do not act as a signal during compatible or incompatible interactions with the powdery mildew fungus (Erysiphe graminis f. sp. hordei) JO - J. Plant Physiol. PY - 1997 SP - 127-132 AU - Hause, B. AU - Kogel, K.-H. AU - Parthier, B. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 150 UR - DO - 10.1016/S0176-1617(97)80191-5 AB - We have studied a possible function of jasmonates as mediators in the host-pathogen interaction of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) with the powdery mildew fungus Egh (Erysiphe graminis f. sp. hordei). Previous findings from whole-leaf extracts demonstrated that (i) extracts from infected barley leaves did not contain enhanced levels of jasmonates, (ii) transcripts of jasmonate-inducible genes were not expressed upon infection, and (iii) exogenous application of jasmonates did not induce resistance to Egh (Kogel et al., 1995). Nevertheless, the question arises whether or not jasmonates are involved in the interaction of barley with the powdery mildew fungus at the local site of infection. Using an immunocytological approach the analysis of leaf cross-sections from a susceptible barley cultivar and its near-isogenic mlo5-resistant line revealed no accumulation of JIP-23, the most abundant jasmonate inducible protein, neither in epidermal cells attacked by the pathogen nor in adjacent mesophyll cells. As a positive control, cross-sections from methyl jasmonate-treated leaf segments showed a strong signal for JIP-23 accumulation. Because the presence of the jasmonate-inducible protein is highly indicative for an already low threshold level of endogenous jasmonate (Lehmann et al., 1995), the lack of JIP-23 accumulation at the sites of attempted fungal infection clearly demonstrates the absence of enhanced levels of jasmonates. This excludes even a local rise of jasmonate confined to those single cells penetrated (Mlo genotype) or attacked (mlo5 genotype) by the fungus. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - JOUR ID - 487 TI - Expression of the ribosome-inactivating protein JIP60 from barley in transgenic tobacco leads to an abnormal phenotype and alterations on the level of translation JO - Planta PY - 1997 SP - 470-478 AU - Görschen, E. AU - Dunaeva, M. AU - Hause, B. AU - Reeh, I. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Parthier, B. VL - 202 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - JOUR ID - 388 TI - Induction of a new lipoxygenase form in cucumber leaves by salicylic acid or 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid JO - Bot. Acta PY - 1997 SP - 101-108 AU - Feussner, I. AU - Fritz, I.G. AU - Hause, B. AU - Ullrich, W.R. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 110 UR - http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1438-8677/issues DO - 10.1111/j.1438-8677.1997.tb00616.x AB - Changes in lipoxygenase (LOX) protein pattern and/or activity were investigated in relation to acquired resistance of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) leaves against two powdery mildews, Sphaerotheca fuliginea (Schlecht) Salmon and Erysiphe cichoracearum DC et Merat. Acquired resistance was established by spraying leaves with salicylic acid (SA) or 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (INA) and estimated in whole plants by infested leaf area compared to control plants. SA was more effective than INA. According to Western blots, untreated cucumber leaves contained a 97 kDa LOX form, which remained unchanged for up to 48 h after pathogen inoculation. Upon treatment with SA alone for 24 h or with INA plus pathogen, an additional 95 kDa LOX form appeared which had an isoelectric point in the alkaline range. For the induction of this form, a threshold concentration of 1 mM SA was required, higher SA concentrations did not change LOX-95 expression which remained similar between 24 h and 96 h but further increased upon mildew inoculation. Phloem exudates contained only the LOX-97 form, in intercellular washing fluid no LOX was detected. dichloroisonicotinic localization revealed LOX protein in the cytosol of the mesophyll cells without differences between the forms. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - JOUR ID - 333 TI - Structural elucidation of oxygenated storage lipids in cucumber cotyledons. Implication of lipid body lipoxygenase in lipid mobilization during germination JO - J. Biol. Chem. PY - 1997 SP - 21635-21641 AU - Feussner, I. AU - Balkenhohl, T.J. AU - Porzel, A. AU - Kühn, H. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 272 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Bioorganic Chemistry ER - TY - JOUR ID - 118 TI - Quantitative Analyse von Lipoxygenase-Metaboliten in Lipiden durch NMR-Spektroskopie JO - Biospektrum PY - 1997 SP - 54-58 AU - Feussner, I. AU - Porzel, A. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Kühn, H. VL - 3 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Bioorganic Chemistry ER - TY - JOUR ID - 393 TI - Overexpression of the jasmonate inducible 23 kDa protein (JIP 23) from barley in transgenic tobacco leads to the repression of leaf proteins JO - FEBS Letters PY - 1997 SP - 58-62 AU - Görschen, E. AU - Dunaeva, M. AU - Reeh, I. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 419 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 391 TI - Isolation of a cDNA coding for an ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UBCI of tomato - the first stress-induced UBC of higher plants JO - FEBS Letters PY - 1997 SP - 211-215 AU - Feussner, K. AU - Feussner, I. AU - Leopold, I. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 409 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 334 TI - Jasmonate-signalled gene expression JO - Trends in Plant Sci. PY - 1997 SP - 302-307 AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Parthier, B. VL - 2 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 390 TI - Hypothesis. Do specific linoleate 13-lipoxygenases initiate b-oxidation? JO - FEBS Letters PY - 1997 SP - 1-5 AU - Feussner, I. AU - Kühn, H. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 406 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 399 TI - Molecular modelling, synthesis and biological activity of methyl 3-methyljasmonate and related derivatives JO - Tetrahedron PY - 1997 SP - 8181-8194 AU - Ward, J. AU - Gaskin, P. AU - Sessions, R. AU - Koda, Y. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Beale, M. VL - 53 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 400 TI - Purification and characterization of allene oxide cyclase from dry corn seeds JO - Plant Physiol. PY - 1997 SP - 565-573 AU - Ziegler, J. AU - Hamberg, M. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Parthier, B. VL - 114 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - CHAP ID - 389 TI - Do Lipoxygenases initiate ß-oxidation? T2 - Physiology, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Plant Lipids PB - Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht PY - 1997 SP - 250-252 AU - Feussner, I. AU - Kühn, H. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 0 UR - AB - A2 - Williams, J.P., Mobashsher, U., Khan, M.U. & Lem, N.W. C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 381 TI - Lipid-body lipoxygenase is expressed in cotyledons during germination prior to other lipoxygenase forms JO - Planta PY - 1996 SP - 288-293 AU - Feussner, I. AU - Hause, B. AU - Nellen, A. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Kindl, H. VL - 198 UR - http://link.springer.com/journal/425 DO - 10.1007/BF00206255 AB - Lipid bodies are degraded during germination. Whereas some proteins, e.g. oleosins, are synthesized during the formation of lipid bodies of maturating seeds, a new set of proteins, including a specific form of lipoxygenase (LOX; EC 1.13.11.12), is detectable in lipid bodies during the stage of fat degradation in seed germination. In cotyledons of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings at day 4 of germination, the most conspicuous staining with anti-LOX antibodies was observed in the cytosol. At very early stages of germination, however, the LOX form present in large amounts and synthesized preferentially was the lipid-body LOX. This was demonstrated by immunocytochemical staining of cotyledons from 1-h and 24-h-old seedlings: the immunodecoration of sections of 24-h-old seedlings with anti-LOX antiserum showed label exclusively correlated with lipid bodies of around 3 μm in diameter. In accordance, the profile of LOX protein isolated from lipid bodies during various stages of germination showed a maximum at day 1. By measuring biosynthesis of the protein in vivo we demonstrated that the highest rates of synthesis of lipid-body LOX occurred at day 1 of germination. The early and selective appearance of a LOX form associated with lipid bodies at this stage of development is discussed. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing; Cell and Metabolic Biology ER - TY - JOUR ID - 383 TI - Localized wounding by heat initiates the accumulation of proteinase inhibitor II in abscisic acid-deficient plants by triggering jasmonic acid biosynthesis JO - Plant Physiol. PY - 1996 SP - 853-860 AU - Herde, O. AU - Atzorn, R. AU - Fisahn, J. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Willmitzer, L. AU - Peña-Cortés, H. VL - 112 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 385 TI - Pin2 gene expression in potato and tomato detached leaves from ABA-deficient potato and tomato plants upon systemin treatment JO - Planta PY - 1996 SP - 447-451 AU - Peña-Cortés, H. AU - Prat, S. AU - Atzorn, R. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Willmitzer, L. VL - 198 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 386 TI - Alteration of gene expression by jasmonate and ABA in tobacco and tomato JO - J. Plant Physiol. PY - 1996 SP - 503-510 AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Atzorn, R. AU - Pena-Cortes, H. AU - Parthier, B. VL - 147 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 380 TI - Diadenosine 5'5'''-P1,P4-tetraphosphate (Ap4A) hydrolase from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Lukullus) - Purification, Biochemical properties and behaviour during stress JO - Z. Naturforsch. PY - 1996 SP - 477-486 AU - Feussner, K. AU - Guranowski, A. AU - Kostka, S. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 51c UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 335 TI - Ethylene as a signal mediating the wound response of tomato plants JO - Science PY - 1996 SP - 1914-1917 AU - O'Donnell, P.J. AU - Calvert, C. AU - Atzorn, R. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Leyser, H.M.O. AU - Bowles, D.J. VL - 274 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 375 TI - Resistance in barley against the powdery mildew fungus (Erysiphe graminis f. sp. hordei) is not associated with enhanced levels of endogenous jasmonates JO - Eur. J. Plant Pathol. PY - 1995 SP - 319-332 AU - Kogel, K.-H. AU - Ortel, B. AU - Jarosch, B. AU - Atzorn, R. AU - Schiffer, R. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 101 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 376 TI - Occurrence and identification of jasmonic acid and its amino acid conjugates induced by osmotic stress in barley leaf tissue JO - J. Plant Growth Reg. PY - 1995 SP - 29-36 AU - Kramell, R. AU - Atzorn, R. AU - Schneider, G. AU - Miersch, O. AU - Brückner, C. AU - Schmidt, J. AU - Sembdner, G. AU - Parthier, B. VL - 14 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 377 TI - Accumulation of jasmonate, abscisic acid, specific transcripts and proteins in osmotically stressed barley leaf segments JO - Planta PY - 1995 SP - 156-162 AU - Lehmann, J. AU - Atzorn, R. AU - Brückner, C. AU - Reinbothe, S. AU - Leopold, J. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Parthier, B. VL - 197 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 378 TI - Synthesis of jasmonate-induced proteins in barley (Hordeum vulgare) is inhibited by the growth retardant tetcyclacis JO - Physiol. Plantarum PY - 1995 SP - 335-341 AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Atzorn, R. AU - Leopold, J. AU - Feussner, I. AU - Rademacher, W. AU - Parthier, B. VL - 94 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 374 TI - Expression of a flax allene oxide synthase cDNA leads to an increase in the endogenous jasmonic acid level in transgenic potato plants but not to a corresponding activation of jasmonic acid-responding genes JO - The Plant Cell PY - 1995 SP - 1645-1654 AU - Harms, K. AU - Atzorn, R. AU - Brash, A. AU - Kühn, H. AU - Wasternack, C. AU - Willmitzer, L. AU - Peña-Cortés, H. VL - 7 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER -