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Publikationen - Molekulare Signalverarbeitung

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Bücher und Buchkapitel

Wasternack, C. Jasmonates: Synthesis, Metabolism, Signal Transduction and Action (2016) ISBN: ISBN 978-0-4700-1590-2 DOI: 10.1002/9780470015902.a0020138.pub2

Jasmonic acid and other fatty-acid-derived compounds called oxylipins are signals in stress responses and development of plants. The receptor complex, signal transduction components as well as repressors and activators in jasmonate-induced gene expression have been elucidated. Different regulatory levels and cross-talk with other hormones are responsible for the multiplicity of plant responses to environmental and developmental cues.
Bücher und Buchkapitel

Wasternack, C. Jasmonates in plant growth and stress responses. (Tran, L.-S.; Pal, S.). Springer, 221-264, (2014) ISBN: 978-1-4939-0490-7 (hardcover) 978-1-4939-4814-7 (softcover) DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4939-0491-4_8

Abiotic and biotic stresses adversely affect plant growth and productivity. The phytohormones regulate key physiological events under normal and stressful conditions for plant development. Accumulative research efforts have discovered important roles of phytohormones and their interactions in regulation of plant adaptation to numerous stressors. Intensive molecular studies have elucidated various plant hormonal pathways; each of which consist of many signaling components that link a specific hormone perception to the regulation of downstream genes. Signal transduction pathways of auxin, abscisic acid, cytokinins, gibberellins and ethylene have been thoroughly investigated. More recently, emerging signaling pathways of brassinosteroids, jasmonates, salicylic acid and strigolactones offer an exciting gateway for understanding their multiple roles in plant physiological processes.At the molecular level, phytohormonal crosstalks can be antagonistic or synergistic or additive in actions. Additionally, the signal transduction component(s) of one hormonal pathway may interplay with the signaling component(s) of other hormonal pathway(s). Together these and other research findings have revolutionized the concept of phytohormonal studies in plants. Importantly, genetic engineering now enables plant biologists to manipulate the signaling pathways of plant hormones for development of crop varieties with improved yield and stress tolerance.This book, written by internationally recognized scholars from various countries, represents the state-of-the-art understanding of plant hormones’ biology, signal transduction and implications. Aimed at a wide range of readers, including researchers, students, teachers and many others who have interests in this flourishing research field, every section is concluded with biotechnological strategies to modulate hormone contents or signal transduction pathways and crosstalk that enable us to develop crops in a sustainable manner. Given the important physiological implications of plant hormones in stressful environments, our book is finalized with chapters on phytohormonal crosstalks under abiotic and biotic stresses. 
Bücher und Buchkapitel

Dorka, R.; Miersch, O.; Hause, B.; Weik, P.; Wasternack, C. Chronobiologische Phänomene und Jasmonatgehalt bei Viscum album L. (Scheer, R.; Bauer, R.; Bekker, A.; Berg, P. A.; Fintelmann, V.). 49-56, (2009) ISBN: 978-3-933351-82

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Publikation

Delker, C.; Stenzel, I.; Hause, B.; Miersch, O.; Feussner, I.; Wasternack, C. Jasmonate Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana - Enzymes, Products, Regulation Plant Biol. 8, 297-306, (2006) DOI: 10.1055/s-2006-923935

Among the plant hormones jasmonic acid and related derivatives are known to mediate stress responses and several developmental processes. Biosynthesis, regulation, and metabolism of jasmonic acid in Arabidopsis thaliana are reviewed, including properties of mutants of jasmonate biosynthesis. The individual signalling properties of several jasmonates are described.
Publikation

Wasternack, C.; Stenzel, I.; Hause, B.; Hause, G.; Kutter, C.; Maucher, H.; Neumerkel, J.; Feussner, I.; Miersch, O. The wound response in tomato - Role of jasmonic acid J. Plant Physiol 163, 297-306 , (2006) DOI: 10.1016/j.jplph.2005.10.014

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Publikation

Schilling, S.; Manhart, S.; Hoffmann, T.; Ludwig, H.-H.; Wasternack, C.; Demuth, H.-U. Substrate specificity of glutaminyl cyclases from plants and animals Biol. Chem. 384, 1583-1592, (2003)

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Bücher und Buchkapitel

Wasternack, C.; Hause, B. Jasmonates and octadecanoids: Signals in plant stress responses and development (Moldave, K.). 72, 165-221, (2002) DOI: 10.1016/S0079-6603(02)72070-9

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Publikation

Miersch, O.; Wasternack, C. Octadecanoid and jasmonate signaling in tomato leaves (<EM>Lycopersicon esculentum</EM> Mill.): Endogenous jasmonates do not induce jasmonate biosynthesis Biol. Chem. 381, 715-722, (2000)

Jasmonates and their precursors, the octadecanoids, are signals in stress-induced alteration of gene expression. Several mRNAs coding for enzymes of jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis are up-regulated upon JA treatment or endogenous rise of JA level. Here we inspected the positive feed back of endogenous JA on JA formation as well as its beta-oxidation steps. JA responsive gene expression was recorded in terms of proteinase inhibitor2 (pin2) mRNA accumulation. JA formed upon treatment of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Moneymaker) leaves with JA derivatives carrying different length of the carboxylic acid side chain was quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The data reveal that beta-oxidation of the side chain occurs up to a butyric acid moiety. The amount of JA formed from side-chain modified JA derivatives, correlated with pin2-mRNA accumulation. JA derivatives with a carboxylic side chain of 3, 5 or 7 carbon atoms were unable to form JA and to express on pin2, whereas even numbered derivatives were active. After treatment of tomato leaves with (10-2H)-(-)-12-oxophytoenoic acid, (4-2H)-(-)-JA and its methyl ester were formed and could be quantified separately from the endogenously unlabeled JA pool by GC-MS analysis via isotopic discrimination. The level of 8 nmol per g f.w. JA and its methyl ester originated exclusively from labeled 12-oxophytoenic acid. This and further data indicate that endogenous synthesis of the JA precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid as well as of JA and its methyl ester are not induced in tomato leaves, suggesting that positive feedback in JA biosynthesis does not function in vivo.
Bücher und Buchkapitel

Feussner, I.; Balkenhohl, T.; Porzel, A.; Kühn, H.; Wasternack, C. Structural elucidation of oxygenated triacylglycerols in cucumber and sunflower cotyledons (Schreier, P., Herderich, M., Humpf, H.-U., Schwab, W.). P. Vieweg, Wiesbaden 57-58, (1998)

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Bücher und Buchkapitel

Kohlmann, M.; Kuntzsch, A.; Wasternack, C.; Feussner, I. Effect of jasmonic acid methyl ester on enzymes of the lipoxygenase pathway in barley leaves (Schreier, P., Herderich, M., Humpf, H.-U., Schwab, W.). P. Vieweg, Wiesbaden 339-340, (1998)

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