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Publikation

García, M. L.; Bó, E. D.; da Graça, J. V.; Gago-Zachert, S.; Hammond, J.; Moreno, P.; Natsuaki, T.; Pallás, V.; Navarro, J. A.; Reyes, C. A.; Luna, G. R.; Sasaya, T.; Tzanetakis, I. E.; Vaira, A. M.; Verbeek, M.; ICTV Report Consortium Corrigendum: ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile: Ophioviridae J Gen Virol 99, 949-949, (2018) DOI: 10.1099/jgv.0.001093

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Publikation

García, M. L.; Bó, E. D.; da Graça, J. V.; Gago-Zachert, S.; Hammond, J.; Moreno, P.; Natsuaki, T.; Pallás, V.; Navarro, J. A.; Reyes, C. A.; Luna, G. R.; Sasaya, T.; Tzanetakis, I. E.; Vaira, A. M.; Verbeek, M.; ICTV Report Consortium ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile: Ophioviridae J Gen Virol 98 , 1161-1162, (2017) DOI: 10.1099/jgv.0.000836

Ophioviridae,The Ophioviridae is a family of filamentous plant viruses, with single-stranded negative, and possibly ambisense, RNA genomes of 11.3–12.5 kb divided into 3–4 segments, each encapsidated separately. Virions are naked filamentous nucleocapsids, forming kinked circles of at least two different contour lengths. The sole genus, Ophiovirus, includes seven species. Four ophioviruses are soil-transmitted and their natural hosts include trees, shrubs, vegetables and bulbous or corm-forming ornamentals, both monocots and dicots. This is a summary of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) Report on the taxonomy of the which is available at http://www.ictv.global/report/ophioviridae.
Bücher und Buchkapitel

Vaira, A. M.; Gago-Zachert, S.; Garcia, M. L.; Guerri, J.; Hammond, J.; Milne, R. G.; Moreno, P.; Morikawa, T.; Natsuaki, T.; Navarro, J. A.; Pallas, V.; Torok, V.; Verbeek, M.; Vetten, H. J. Family - Ophioviridae (King, A. M. Q., et al., eds.). 743-748, (2012) ISBN: 978-0-12-384684-6 DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-12-384684-6.00060-4

This chapter focuses on Ophioviridae family whose sole member genus is Ophiovirus. The member species of the genus include Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV), Freesia sneak virus(FreSV), Lettuce ring necrosis virus (LRNV), and Mirafiori lettuce big-vein virus (MiLBVV).The single stranded negative/possibly ambisense RNA genome is divided into 3–4 segments, each of which is encapsidated in a single coat protein (43–50 kDa) forming filamentous virions of about 3 nm in diameter, in shape of kinked or probably internally coiled circles of at least two different contour lengths. Ophioviruses can be mechanically transmitted to a limited range of test plants, inducing local lesions and systemic mottle. The natural hosts of CPsV, ranunculus white mottle virus (RWMV), MiLBVV, and LRNV are dicotyledonous plants of widely differing taxonomy. CPsV has a wide geographical distribution in citrus in the Americas, in the Mediterranean and in New Zealand. FreSV has been reported in two species of the family Ranunculacae from Northern Italy, and in lettuce in France and Germany. Tulip mild mottle mosaic virus (TMMMV) has been reported in tulips in Japan. LRNV is closely associated with lettuce ring necrosis disease in The Netherlands, Belgium, and France, and FreSV has been reported in Europe, Africa, North America and New Zealand.
Bücher und Buchkapitel

Vaira, A.M.; Acotto, G.P.; Gago-Zachert, S.; García, M.L.; Grau, O.; Milne, R.G.; Morikawa, T.; Natsuaki, T.; Torov, V.; Verbeek, M.; Vetten, H.J. Genus Ophiovirus (Fauquet, C. M., Mayo, M. A., Maniloff, J., Desselberger, U., Ball, L. A.). Elsevier, Academic Press 673-679, (2005) ISBN: 9780080575483; 9780122499517

Virus Taxonomy is a standard and comprehensive source for the classification of viruses, created by the International Committee of the Taxonomy of Viruses. The book includes eight taxonomic reports of the ICTV and provides comprehensive information on 3 taxonomic orders of viruses, 73 families, 9 subfamilies, 287 genera, and 1938 virus species. The book also features about 429 colored pictures and diagrams for more efficient learning. The text is divided into four parts, comprised of 16 chapters and presenting the following features: • Compiled data from numerous international experts about virus taxonomy and nomenclature • Organized information on over 6000 recognized viruses, illustrated with diagrams of genome organization and virus replication cycle • Data on the phylogenetic relationships among viruses of the same and different taxa • Discussion of the qualitative and quantitative relationships of virus sequences The book is a definitive reference for microbiologists, molecular biologists, research-level virologists, infectious disease specialists, and pharmaceutical researchers working on antiviral agents. Students and novices in taxonomy and nomenclature will also find this text useful. 
Publikation

Grubb, C.D.; Gross, H.B.; Chen, D.L.; Abel, S. Identification of <em>Arabidopsis</em> mutants with altered glucosinolate profiles based on isothiocyanate bioactivity Plant Sci 162, 143 - 152, (2002) DOI: 10.1016/S0168-9452(01)00550-7

Glucosinolates are a diverse class of nitrogen- and sulfur-containing secondary metabolites. They are rapidly hydrolyzed on tissue disruption to a number of biologically active compounds that are increasingly attracting interest as anticarcinogenic phytochemicals and crop protectants. Several glucosinolate-derived isothiocyanates are potent chemopreventive agents that favorably modulate carcinogen metabolism in mammals. Methylsulfinylalkyl isothiocyanates, in particular the 4-methylsulfinylbutyl derivative, are selective and potent inducers of mammalian detoxification enzymes such as quinone reductase (QR). Cruciferous plants including Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heyhn, synthesize methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates, which are derived from methionine. Using a colorimetric assay for QR activity in murine hepatoma cells and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of desulfoglucosinolates, we have demonstrated a strong positive correlation between leaf QR inducer potency and leaf content of methionine-derived glucosinolates in various A. thaliana ecotypes and available glucosinolate mutants. In a molecular genetic approach to glucosinolate biosynthesis, we screened 3000 chemically mutagenized M2 plants of the Columbia ecotype for altered leaf QR inducer potency. Subsequent HPLC analysis of progeny of putative mutants identified six lines with significant and heritable changes in leaf glucosinolate content and composition.
Publikation

Chen, D.L.; Delatorre,.C.A.; Bakker, A.; Abel, S. Conditional identification of phosphate starvation-response mutants in <span style="font-style: italic;">Arabidopsis thaliana</span> Planta 211, 13 - 22, (2000)

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Publikation

Colon-Carmona, A.; Chen, D.L.; Yeh, K.C.; Abel, S. Aux/IAA proteins are phosphorylated by phytochrome in vitro Plant Physiology 124, 1728-1738, (2000)

Auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA) genes encode short-lived transcription factors that are induced as a primary response to the plant growth hormone IAA or auxin. Gain-of-function mutations in Arabidopsis genes,SHY2/IAA3, AXR3/IAA17, andAXR2/IAA7 cause pleiotropic phenotypes consistent with enhanced auxin responses, possibly by increasing Aux/IAA protein stability. Semidominant mutations shy2-1D,shy2-2, axr3-1, and axr2-1induce ectopic light responses in dark-grown seedlings. Because genetic studies suggest that the shy2-1D andshy2-2 mutations bypass phytochrome requirement for certain aspects of photomorphogenesis, we tested whether SHY2/IAA3 and related Aux/IAA proteins interact directly with phytochrome and whether they are substrates for its protein kinase activity. Here we show that recombinant Aux/IAA proteins from Arabidopsis and pea (Pisum sativum) interact in vitro with recombinant phytochrome A from oat (Avena sativa). We further show that recombinant SHY2/IAA3, AXR3/IAA17, IAA1, IAA9, and Ps-IAA4 are phosphorylated by recombinant oat phytochrome A in vitro. Deletion analysis of Ps-IAA4 indicates that phytochrome A phosphorylation occurs on the N-terminal half of the protein. Metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation studies with affinity-purified antibodies to IAA3 demonstrate increased in vivo steady-state levels of mutant IAA3 in shy2-2 plants and phosphorylation of the SHY2-2 protein in vivo. Phytochrome-dependent phosphorylation of Aux/IAA proteins is proposed to provide one molecular mechanism for integrating auxin and light signaling in plant development.
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