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Publikationen - Molekulare Signalverarbeitung

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Publikation

Hause, B.; Maier, W.; Miersch, O.; Kramell, R.; Strack, D. Induction of jasmonate biosynthesis in arbuscular mycorrhizal barley roots Plant Physiol. 130, 1213-1220, (2002) DOI: 10.1104/pp.006007

Colonization of barley (Hordeum vulgare cv Salome) roots by an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, Glomus intraradices Schenck & Smith, leads to elevated levels of endogenous jasmonic acid (JA) and its amino acid conjugate JA-isoleucine, whereas the level of the JA precursor, oxophytodienoic acid, remains constant. The rise in jasmonates is accompanied by the expression of genes coding for an enzyme of JA biosynthesis (allene oxide synthase) and of a jasmonate-induced protein (JIP23). In situ hybridization and immunocytochemical analysis revealed that expression of these genes occurred cell specifically within arbuscule-containing root cortex cells. The concomitant gene expression indicates that jasmonates are generated and act within arbuscule-containing cells. By use of a near-synchronous mycorrhization, analysis of temporal expression patterns showed the occurrence of transcript accumulation 4 to 6 d after the appearance of the first arbuscules. This suggests that the endogenous rise in jasmonates might be related to the fully established symbiosis rather than to the recognition of interacting partners or to the onset of interaction. Because the plant supplies the fungus with carbohydrates, a model is proposed in which the induction of JA biosynthesis in colonized roots is linked to the stronger sink function of mycorrhizal roots compared with nonmycorrhizal roots.
Publikation

Ziegler, J.; Vogt, T.; Miersch, O.; Strack, D. Concentration of dilute protein solutions prior to sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis Anal. Biochem 250, 257-260, (1997) DOI: 10.1006/abio.1997.2248

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Publikation

Quint, M.; Ito, H.; Zhang, W.; Gray, W.M. Characterization of a novel temperature-sensitive allele of the CUL1/AXR6 subunit of SCF ubiquitin-ligases Plant J 43, 371-383, (2005)

Selective protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has emerged as a key regulatory mechanism in a wide variety of cellular processes. The selective components of this pathway are the E3 ubiquitin-ligases which act downstream of the ubiquitin-activating and -conjugating enzymes to identify specific substrates for ubiquitinylation. SCF-type ubiquitin-ligases are the most abundant class of E3 enzymes in Arabidopsis. In a genetic screen for enhancers of the tir1-1 auxin response defect, we identified eta1/axr6-3, a recessive and temperature-sensitive mutation in the CUL1 core component of the SCFTIR1 complex. The axr6-3 mutation interferes with Skp1 binding, thus preventing SCF complex assembly. axr6-3 displays a pleiotropic phenotype with defects in numerous SCF-regulated pathways including auxin signaling, jasmonate signaling, flower development, and photomorphogenesis. We used axr6-3 as a tool for identifying pathways likely to be regulated by SCF-mediated proteolysis and propose new roles for SCF regulation of the far-red light/phyA and sugar signaling pathways. The recessive inheritance and the temperature-sensitive nature of the pleiotropically acting axr6-3 mutation opens promising possibilities for the identification and investigation of SCF-regulated pathways in Arabidopsis.
Publikation

Parry, G.; Calderón Villalobos, L.I.; Prigge, M.; Peret, B.; Dharmasiri, S.; Itoh, H.; Lechner, E.; Gray, W.M.; Bennett, M.; Estelle, M. Complex regulation of the TIR/AFB family of auxin receptors Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 106(52), 22540-22545, (2009) DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0911967106

Auxin regulates most aspects of plant growth and development. The hormone is perceived by the TIR1/AFB family of F-box proteins acting in concert with the Aux/IAA transcriptional repressors. Arabidopsis plants that lack members of the TIR1/AFB family are auxin resistant and display a variety of growth defects. However, little is known about the functional differences between individual members of the family. Phylogenetic studies reveal that the TIR1/AFB proteins are conserved across land plant lineages and fall into four clades. Three of these subgroups emerged before separation of angiosperms and gymnosperms whereas the last emerged before the monocot-eudicot split. This evolutionary history suggests that the members of each clade have distinct functions. To explore this possibility in Arabidopsis, we have analyzed a range of mutant genotypes, generated promoter swap transgenic lines, and performed in vitro binding assays between individual TIR1/AFB and Aux/IAA proteins. Our results indicate that the TIR1/AFB proteins have distinct biochemical activities and that TIR1 and AFB2 are the dominant auxin receptors in the seedling root. Further, we demonstrate that TIR1, AFB2, and AFB3, but not AFB1 exhibit significant posttranscriptional regulation. The microRNA miR393 is expressed in a pattern complementary to that of the auxin receptors and appears to regulate TIR1/AFB expression. However our data suggest that this regulation is complex. Our results suggest that differences between members of the auxin receptor family may contribute to the complexity of auxin response.
Publikation

Quint, M.; Barkawi, L.S.; Fan, K.T.; Cohen, J.D.; Gray, W.M. Arabidopsis IAR4 modulates auxin response by regulating auxin homeostasis Plant Physiol 150, 748-758, (2009) DOI: 10.1104/pp.109.136671

In a screen for enhancers of tir1-1 auxin resistance, we identified two novel alleles of the putative mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α-subunit, IAA-Alanine Resistant4 (IAR4). In addition to enhancing the auxin response defects of tir1-1, iar4 single mutants exhibit numerous auxin-related phenotypes including auxin-resistant root growth and reduced lateral root development, as well as defects in primary root growth, root hair initiation, and root hair elongation. Remarkably, all of these iar4 mutant phenotypes were rescued when endogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels were increased by growth at high temperature or overexpression of the YUCCA1 IAA biosynthetic enzyme, suggesting that iar4 mutations may alter IAA homeostasis rather than auxin response. Consistent with this possibility, iar4 mutants exhibit increased Aux/IAA stability compared to wild type under basal conditions, but not in response to an auxin treatment. Measurements of free IAA levels detected no significant difference between iar4-3 and wild-type controls. However, we consistently observed significantly higher levels of IAA-amino acid conjugates in the iar4-3 mutant. Furthermore, using stable isotope-labeled IAA precursors, we observed a significant increase in the relative utilization of the Trp-independent IAA biosynthetic pathway in iar4-3. We therefore suggest that the auxin phenotypes of iar4 mutants are the result of altered IAA homeostasis.
Publikation

Floß, D.S.; Hause, B.; Lange, P.R.; Küster, H.; Strack, D.; Walter, M.H. Knock-down of the MEP pathway isogene 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase 2 inhibits formation of arbuscular mycorrhiza-induced apocarotenoids, and abolishes normal expression of mycorrhiza-specific plant marker genes Plant J 56, 86-100 , (2008) DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-313X.2008.03575.x

The first step of the plastidial methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway is catalyzed by two isoforms of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS1 and DXS2). In Medicago truncatula, MtDXS1 and MtDXS2 genes exhibit completely different expression patterns. Most prominently, colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi induces the accumulation of certain apocarotenoids (cyclohexenone and mycorradicin derivatives) correlated with the expression of MtDXS2 but not of MtDXS1. To prove a distinct function of DXS2, a selective RNAi approach on MtDXS2 expression was performed in transgenic hairy roots of M. truncatula. Repression of MtDXS2 consistently led to reduced transcript levels in mycorrhizal roots, and to a concomitant reduction of AM-induced apocarotenoid accumulation. The transcript levels of MtDXS1 remained unaltered in RNAi plants, and no phenotypical changes in non-AM plants were observed. Late stages of the AM symbiosis were adversely affected, but only upon strong repression with residual MtDXS2-1 transcript levels remaining below approximately 10%. This condition resulted in a strong decrease in the transcript levels of MtPT4, an AM-specific plant phosphate transporter gene, and in a multitude of other AM-induced plant marker genes, as shown by transcriptome analysis. This was accompanied by an increased proportion of degenerating and dead arbuscules at the expense of mature ones. The data reveal a requirement for DXS2-dependent MEP pathway-based isoprenoid products to sustain mycorrhizal functionality at later stages of the symbiosis. They further validate the concept of a distinct role for DXS2 in secondary metabolism, and offer a novel tool to selectively manipulate the levels of secondary isoprenoids by targeting their precursor supply.
Publikation

Zhang, W.; Ito, H.; Quint, M.; Huang, H.; Noël, L.D.; Gray, W.M. Genetic analysis of CAND1-CUL1 interactions in Arabidopsis supports a role for CAND1-mediated cycling of the SCFTIR1 complex Proc Natl Acad Sci 105, 8470-8475, (2008) DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0804144105

SKP1-Cullin1-F-box protein (SCF) ubiquitin-ligases regulate numerous aspects of eukaryotic growth and development. Cullin-Associated and Neddylation-Dissociated (CAND1) modulates SCF function through its interactions with the CUL1 subunit. Although biochemical studies with human CAND1 suggested that CAND1 plays a negative regulatory role by sequestering CUL1 and preventing SCF complex assembly, genetic studies in Arabidopsis have shown that cand1 mutants exhibit reduced SCF activity, demonstrating that CAND1 is required for optimal SCF function in vivo. Together, these genetic and biochemical studies have suggested a model of CAND1-mediated cycles of SCF complex assembly and disassembly. Here, using the SCFTIR1 complex of the Arabidopsis auxin response pathway, we test the SCF cycling model with Arabidopsis mutant derivatives of CAND1 and CUL1 that have opposing effects on the CAND1CUL1 interaction. We find that the disruption of the CAND1CUL1 interaction results in an increased abundance of assembled SCFTIR1 complex. In contrast, stabilization of the CAND1CUL1 interaction diminishes SCFTIR1 complex abundance. The fact that both decreased and increased CAND1CUL1 interactions result in reduced SCFTIR1 activity in vivo strongly supports the hypothesis that CAND1-mediated cycling is required for optimal SCF function.
Publikation

Quint, M.; Gray, W.M. Auxin signaling Curr Opin Plant Biol 9, 448-453, (2006) DOI: 10.1016/j.pbi.2006.07.006

Auxin regulates a host of plant developmental and physiological processes, including embryogenesis, vascular differentiation, organogenesis, tropic growth, and root and shoot architecture. Genetic and biochemical studies carried out over the past decade have revealed that much of this regulation involves the SCFTIR1/AFB-mediated proteolysis of the Aux/IAA family of transcriptional regulators. With the recent finding that the TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESPONSE1 (TIR1)/AUXIN SIGNALING F-BOX (AFB) proteins also function as auxin receptors, a potentially complete, and surprisingly simple, signaling pathway from perception to transcriptional response is now before us. However, understanding how this seemingly simple pathway controls the myriad of specific auxin responses remains a daunting challenge, and compelling evidence exists for SCFTIR1/AFB-independent auxin signaling pathways.
Publikation

Isayenkov, S.; Mrosk, C.; Stenzel, I.; Strack, D.; Hause, B. Suppression of allene oxide cyclase in hairy roots of <span>Medicago truncatula</span> reduces jasmonate levels and the degree of mycorrhization with <span>Glomus intraradices</span> Plant Physiol 139, 1401-1410, (2005) DOI: 10.1104/pp.105.069054

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