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Publikationen - Molekulare Signalverarbeitung

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Publikation

Wasternack, C.; Stenzel, I.; Hause, B.; Hause, G.; Kutter, C.; Maucher, H.; Neumerkel, J.; Feussner, I.; Miersch, O. The wound response in tomato - Role of jasmonic acid J. Plant Physiol 163, 297-306 , (2006) DOI: 10.1016/j.jplph.2005.10.014

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Publikation

Mur, L.A.J.; Kenton, P.; Atzorn, R.; Miersch, O.; Wasternack, C. The outcomes of concentration specific interactions between salicylate and jasmonate signaling include synergy, antagonism and the activation of cell death Plant Physiol. 140, 249-262, (2006) DOI: 10.1104/pp.105.072348

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Publikation

Sharma, V.K.; Monostori, T.; Hause, B.; Maucher, H.; Göbel, C.; Hornung, E.; Hänsch, R.; Bittner, F.; Wasternack, C.; Feussner, I.; Mendel, R.R.; Schulze, J. Genetic transformation of barley to modify expression of a 13-lipoxygenase Acta Biol. Szeged 49, 33-34 , (2005)

Immature scutella of barley were transformed with cDNA coding for a 13-li-poxygenase of barley (LOX-100) via particle bombardment. Regenerated plants were tested by PAT-assay, Western-analysis and PCR-screening. Immunocytochemical assay of T0 plants showed expression of the LOX cDNA both in the chloroplasts and in the cytosol, depending on the presence of the chloroplast signal peptide sequences in the cDNA. A few transgenic plants containing higher amounts of LOX-derived products have been found. These are the candidates for further analysis concerning pathogen resistance.
Publikation

Schüler, G.; Mithöfer, A.; Baldwin, I.T.; Berger, S.; Ebel, S.; Santos, J.G.; Herrmann, G.; Hölscher, D.; Kramell, R.; Kutchan, T.M.; Maucher, H.; Schneider, B.; Stenzel, I.; Wasternack, C.; Boland, W. Coronalon: a powerful tool in plant stress physiology FEBS Lett. 563, 17-22, (2004) DOI: 10.1016/S0014-5793(04)00239-X

Coronalon, a synthetic 6-ethyl indanoyl isoleucine conjugate, has been designed as a highly active mimic of octadecanoid phytohormones that are involved in insect and disease resistance. The spectrum of biological activities that is affected by coronalon was investigated in nine different plant systems specifically responding to jasmonates and/or 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid. In all bioassays analyzed, coronalon demonstrated a general strong activity at low micromolar concentrations. The results obtained showed the induction of (i) defense-related secondary metabolite accumulation in both cell cultures and plant tissues, (ii) specific abiotic and biotic stress-related gene expression, and (iii) root growth retardation. The general activity of coronalon in the induction of plant stress responses together with its simple and efficient synthesis suggests that this compound might serve as a valuable tool in the examination of various aspects in plant stress physiology. Moreover, coronalon might become employed in agriculture to elicit plant resistance against various aggressors.
Publikation

Maucher, H.; Stenzel, I.; Miersch, O.; Stein, N.; Prasad, M.; Zierold, U.; Schweizer, P.; Dorer, C.; Hause, B.; Wasternack, C. The allene oxide cyclase of barley (<span>Hordeum vulgare</span> L.) - cloning and organ-specific expression Phytochemistry 65, 801-811, (2004) DOI: 10.1016/j.phytochem.2004.01.009

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Bücher und Buchkapitel

Weichert, H.; Maucher, H.; Hornung, E.; Wasternack, C.; Feussner, I. Shift in fatty acid and oxylipin pattern of tomato leaves following overexpression of the allene oxide cyclase (Murata, N., Yamada, M., Nishida, I., Okuyama, H., Sekijar, J., Hajme, W.). Kluwer Academic Publishers 275-278, (2003)

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Publikation

Ziegler, J.; Stenzel, I.; Hause, B.; Maucher, H.; Miersch, O.; Hamberg, M.; Grimm, M.; Ganal, M.; Wasternack, C. Molecular cloning of allene oxide cyclase: The enzyme establishing the stereochemistry of octadecanoids and jasmonates J. Biol. Chem. 275, 19132-19138, (2000) DOI: 10.1074/jbc.M002133200

Allene oxide cyclase (AOC) catalyses the stereospecific cyclisation of an unstable allene oxide to 9(S),13(S)-12-oxo-10,15(Z)-phytodienoic acid, the ultimate precursor of jasmonic acid. This enzyme has previously been purified, and two identical N-terminal peptides were found suggesting AOC to be a homodimeric protein. Furthermore, the native protein was N-terminal processed. Using degenerate primers, a PCR fragment could be generated from tomato, which was further used to isolate a full length cDNA clone of 1kb coding for a protein with 245 amino acids with a molecular mass of 26 kDa. Whereas expression of the whole coding region failed to detect AOC activity, a 5-'truncated protein showed high activity, suggesting that additional amino acids impair the enzymatic function. Steric analysis of the 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid formed by the recombinant AOC revealed exclusive (>99%) formation of the 9(S),13(S) enantiomer. Exclusive formation of this enantiomer was also found in wounded tomato leaves. Southern analysis and genetic mapping revealed the existence of a single gene for AOC located on chromosome 2 of tomato. Inspection of the N-terminus revealed the presence of a chloroplastic transit peptide, and the location of AOC protein in that compartment could be shown by immunohistochemical methods. Concomitant with the jasmonate levels, the accumulation of AOC mRNA was transiently induced after wounding of tomato leaves.
Publikation

Kramell, R.; Miersch, O.; Atzorn, R.; Parthier, B.; Wasternack, C. Octadecanoid-derived alteration of gene expression and the 'oxylipin signature' in stressed barley leaves - implications for different signalling pathways Plant Physiol. 123, 177-186, (2000)

Stress-induced gene expression in barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Salome) leaves has been correlated with temporally changing levels of octadecanoids and jasmonates, quantified by means of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-single ion monitoring. Application of sorbitol-induced stress led to a low and transient rise of jasmonic acid (JA), its precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA) and the methyl esters JAME and OPDAME, respectively, followed by a large increase in their levels. JA and JAME peaked between 12 and 16 h, about 4 hours before OPDA and OPDAME. However, OPDA accumulated up to a 2.5-fold higher level than the other compounds. Dihomo-jasmonic acid and 9,13-didehydro-12- oxophytoenoic acid were identified as minor components. Kinetic analyses revealed that a transient threshold of jasmonates or octadecanoids is necessary and sufficient to initiate JA responsive gene expression. Although OPDA and OPDAME applied exogenously were metabolized to JA in considerable amounts, both of them can induce gene expression per se as evidenced by those genes which do not respond to endogenously formed JA. Also, coronatine induces JA-responsive genes independently from endogenous JA. As evidenced by application of deuterated JA, endogenous synthesis of JA is not induced by JA treatment. The data are discussed in terms of distinct signalling pathways.
Publikation

Kenton, P.; Mur, L.A.J.; Atzorn, R.; Wasternack, C.; Draper, J. (—)-Jasmonic Acid Accumulation in Tobacco Hypersensitive Response Lesions Mol. Plant Microbiol. Interactions 12, 74-78, (1999) DOI: 10.1094/MPMI.1999.12.1.74

Tobacco infected with Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola undergoes a hypersensitive response (HR). Jasmonic acid (JA) accumulated within the developing lesion 3 to 9 h after infection and this accumulation preceded protein loss, cell death, and malondialdehyde accumulation. Accumulating JA consisted largely of the (—)-JA stereoisomer and was essentially restricted to the HR lesion
Publikation

Herde, O.; Atzorn, R.; Fisahn, J.; Wasternack, C.; Willmitzer, L.; Peña-Cortés, H. Localized wounding by heat initiates the accumulation of proteinase inhibitor II in abscisic acid-deficient plants by triggering jasmonic acid biosynthesis Plant Physiol. 112, 853-860, (1996)

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