@Article{IPB-1801, author = {Ryan,P. T. and Ó’Maoiléidigh, D. S. and Drost, H.-G. and Kwaśniewska, D. and Gabel, A. and Grosse, I. and Graciet, E. and Quint, M. and Wellmer, F.}, title = {{Patterns of gene expression during Arabidopsis flower development from the time of initiation to maturation}}, year = {2015}, pages = {488 }, journal = {BMC Genomics}, doi = {10.1186/s12864-015-1699-6}, url = { http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/s12864-015-1699-6.pdf}, volume = {16}, abstract = {Background:The formation of flowers is one of the main model systems to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that control developmental processes in plants. Although several studies have explored gene expression during flower development in the model plant Arabidopsis thalianaon a genome-wide scale, a continuous series of expression data from the earliest floral stages until maturation has been lacking. Here, we used a floral induction system to closethis information gap and to generate a reference dataset for stage-specific gene expression during flower formation.Results:Using a floral induction system, we collected floral buds at 14 different stages from the time of initiation until maturation. Using whole-genome microarray analysis, we identified 7,405 genes that exhibit rapid expression changes during flower development. These genes comprise many known floral regulators and we found that the expression profiles for these regulators match their known expression patterns, thus validating the dataset. We analyzed groups ofco-expressed genes for over-represented cellular and developmental functions through Gene Ontology analysis and found that they could be assigned specific patterns of activities, which are in agreement with the progression of flower development. Furthermore, by mapping binding sites of floral organ identity factors onto our dataset, we were able to identify gene groups that are likely predominantly under control of these transcriptional regulators. We furtherfound that the distribution of paralogs among groups of co-expressed genes varies considerably, with genes expressed predominantly at early and intermediate stages of flower development showing the highest proportion of such genes.Conclusions:Our results highlight and describe the dynamic expression changes undergone by a large numberof genes during flower development. They further provide a comprehensive reference dataset for temporal gene expression during flower formation and we demonstrate that it can be used to integrate data from other genomics approaches such as genome-wide localization studies of transcription factor binding sites.} } @Article{IPB-831, author = {Schilling, S. and Stenzel, I. and von Bohlen, A. and Wermann, M. and Schulz, K. and Demuth, H.-U. and Wasternack, C.}, title = {{Isolation and characterization of the glutaminyl cyclases from \textit{Solanum tuberosum} and \textit{Arabidopsis thaliana}: implications for physiological functions}}, year = {2007}, pages = {145-153}, journal = {Biol. Chem}, volume = {388}, } @Article{IPB-1298, author = {Abel, S. and Ballas, N. and Wong, L-M. and Theologis, A.}, title = {{DNA elements responsive to auxin}}, year = {1996}, pages = {647-654}, journal = {Bio Essays}, url = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/bies.950180808/abstract}, volume = {18(8)}, abstract = { Genes induced by the plant hormone auxin are probably involved in the execution of vital cellular functions and developmental processes. Experimental approaches designed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of auxin action have focused on auxin perception, genetic dissection of the signaling apparatus and specific gene activation. Auxin-responsive promoter elements of early genes provide molecular tools for probing auxin signaling in reverse. Functional analysis of several auxin-specific promoters of unrelated early genes suggests combinatorial utilization of both conserved and variable elements. These elements are arranged into autonomous domains and the combination of such modules generates uniquely composed promoters. Modular promoters allow for auxin-mediated transcriptional responses to be revealed in a tissue- and development-specific manner.} }