TY - JOUR ID - 1801 TI - Patterns of gene expression during Arabidopsis flower development from the time of initiation to maturation JO - BMC Genomics PY - 2015 SP - 488 AU - Ryan,P. T. AU - Ó’Maoiléidigh, D. S. AU - Drost, H.-G. AU - Kwaśniewska, D. AU - Gabel, A. AU - Grosse, I. AU - Graciet, E. AU - Quint, M. AU - Wellmer, F. VL - 16 UR - http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/s12864-015-1699-6.pdf DO - 10.1186/s12864-015-1699-6 AB - Background:The formation of flowers is one of the main model systems to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that control developmental processes in plants. Although several studies have explored gene expression during flower development in the model plant Arabidopsis thalianaon a genome-wide scale, a continuous series of expression data from the earliest floral stages until maturation has been lacking. Here, we used a floral induction system to closethis information gap and to generate a reference dataset for stage-specific gene expression during flower formation.Results:Using a floral induction system, we collected floral buds at 14 different stages from the time of initiation until maturation. Using whole-genome microarray analysis, we identified 7,405 genes that exhibit rapid expression changes during flower development. These genes comprise many known floral regulators and we found that the expression profiles for these regulators match their known expression patterns, thus validating the dataset. We analyzed groups ofco-expressed genes for over-represented cellular and developmental functions through Gene Ontology analysis and found that they could be assigned specific patterns of activities, which are in agreement with the progression of flower development. Furthermore, by mapping binding sites of floral organ identity factors onto our dataset, we were able to identify gene groups that are likely predominantly under control of these transcriptional regulators. We furtherfound that the distribution of paralogs among groups of co-expressed genes varies considerably, with genes expressed predominantly at early and intermediate stages of flower development showing the highest proportion of such genes.Conclusions:Our results highlight and describe the dynamic expression changes undergone by a large numberof genes during flower development. They further provide a comprehensive reference dataset for temporal gene expression during flower formation and we demonstrate that it can be used to integrate data from other genomics approaches such as genome-wide localization studies of transcription factor binding sites. A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 1741 TI - The DET1-COP1-HY5 Pathway Constitutes a Multipurpose Signaling Module Regulating Plant Photomorphogenesis and Thermomorphogenesis JO - Cell Rep PY - 2014 SP - 1983–1989 AU - Delker, C. AU - Sonntag, L. AU - Geo, V. J. AU - Janitza, P. AU - Ibañez, C. AU - Ziermann, H. AU - Peterson, T. AU - Denk, K. AU - Mull, S. AU - Ziegler, J. AU - Davis, S. J. AU - Schneeberger, K. AU - Quint, M. VL - 9 UR - http://www.cell.com/cell-reports/abstract/S2211-1247%2814%2901009-2 DO - 10.1016/j.celrep.2014.11.043 AB - Developmental plasticity enables plants to respond to elevated ambient temperatures by adapting their shoot architecture. On the cellular level, the basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) coordinates this response by activating hormonal modules that in turn regulate growth. In addition to an unknown temperature-sensing mechanism, it is currently not understood how temperature regulates PIF4 activity. Using a forward genetic approach in Arabidopsis thaliana, we present extensive genetic evidence demonstrating that the DE-ETIOLATED 1 (DET1)-CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1)-ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5)-dependent photomorphogenesis pathway transcriptionally regulates PIF4 to coordinate seedling growth in response to elevated temperature. Our findings demonstrate that two of the most prevalent environmental cues, light and temperature, share a much larger set of signaling components than previously assumed. Similar to the toolbox concept in animal embryonic patterning, multipurpose signaling modules might have evolved in plants to translate various environmental stimuli into adaptational growth processes A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER - TY - JOUR ID - 831 TI - Isolation and characterization of the glutaminyl cyclases from Solanum tuberosum and Arabidopsis thaliana: implications for physiological functions JO - Biol. Chem PY - 2007 SP - 145-153 AU - Schilling, S. AU - Stenzel, I. AU - von Bohlen, A. AU - Wermann, M. AU - Schulz, K. AU - Demuth, H.-U. AU - Wasternack, C. VL - 388 UR - AB - A2 - C1 - Molecular Signal Processing ER -