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Publikationen - Molekulare Signalverarbeitung

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Bücher und Buchkapitel

Dorka, R.; Miersch, O.; Hause, B.; Weik, P.; Wasternack, C.; Chronobiologische Phänomene und Jasmonatgehalt bei Viscum album L. 49-66, (2009)

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Bücher und Buchkapitel

Wasternack, C.; Hause, B.; Stenzel, I.; Goetz, S.; Feussner, I.; Miersch, O.; Jasmonate signaling in tomato – The input of tissue-specific occurrence of allene oxide cyclase and JA metabolites (Benning C., Ollrogge, J.). 107-111, (2007)

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Bücher und Buchkapitel

Stumpe, M.; Stenzel, I.; Weichert, H.; Hause, B.; Feussner, I.; The Lipoxygenase Pathway in Mycorrhizal Roots of Medicago Truncatula 287-290, (2003) DOI: 10.1007/978-94-017-0159-4_67

Mycorrhizas are by far the most frequent occurring beneficial symbiotic interactions between plants and fungi. Species in >80% of extant plant families are capable of establishing an arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM). In relation to the development of the symbiosis the first molecular modifications are those associated with plant defense responses, which seem to be locally suppressed to levels compatible with symbiotic interaction (Gianinazzi-Pearson, 1996). AM symbiosis can, however, reduce root disease caused by several soil-borne pathogens. The mechanisms underlying this protective effect are still not well understood. In plants, products of the enzyme lipoxygenase (LOX) and the corresponding downstream enzymes, collectively named LOX pathway (Fig. 1B), are involved in wound healing, pest resistance, and signaling, or they have antimicrobial and antifungal activity (Feussner and Wasternack, 2002). The central reaction in this pathway is catalyzed by LOXs leading to formation of either 9- or 13-hydroperoxy octadeca(di/trien)oic acids (9/13-HPO(D/T); Brash, 1999). Thus LOXs may be divided into 9- and 13-LOXs (Fig. 1A). Seven different reaction branches within this pathway can use these hydroperoxy polyenoic fatty acids (PUFAs) leading to (i) keto PUFAs by a LOX; (ii) epoxy hydroxy-fatty acids by an epoxy alcohol synthase (EAS); (iii) octadecanoids and jasmonates via allene oxide synthase (AOS); (iv) leaf aldehydes and leaf alcohols via fatty acid hydroperoxide lyase (HPL); (v) hydroxy PUFAs (reductase); (vi) divinyl ether PUFAs via divinyl ether synthase (DES); and (vii) epoxy- or dihydrodiolPUFAs via peroxygenase (PDX; Feussner and Wasternack, 2002). AOS, HPL and DES belong to one subfamily of P450-containing enzymes, the CYP74 family (Feussner and Wasternack, 2002). Here, the involvement of this CYP74 enzyme family in mycorrhizal roots of M. truncatula during early stages of AM symbiosis formation was analyzed.
Bücher und Buchkapitel

Kramell, R.; Porzel, A.; Miersch, O.; Schneider, G.; Characterization of Isoleucine Conjugates of Cucurbic Acid Isomers by Reversed-Phase and Chiral High-Performance Liquid Chromatography 77-78, (1998)

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Publikation

Wasternack, C.; Miersch, O.; Kramell, R.; Hause, B.; Ward, J.; Beale, M.; Boland, W.; Parthier, B.; Feussner, I.; Jasmonic acid: biosynthesis, signal transduction, gene expression Fett/Lipid 100, 139-146, (1998) DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1521-4133(19985)100:4/5<139::AID-LIPI139>3.0.CO;2-5

Jasmonic acid (JA) is an ubiquitously occurring plant growth regulator which functions as a signal of developmentally or environmentally regulated expression of various genes thereby contributing to the defense status of plants [1–5]. The formation of jasmonates in a lipid‐based signalling pathway via octadecanoids seems to be a common principle for many plant species to express wound‐ and stressinduced genes [4, 5].There are various octadecanoid‐derived signals [3]. Among them, jasmonic acid and its amino acid conjugates are most active in barley, supporting arguments that β‐oxidation is an essential step in lipid‐based JA mediated responses. Furthermore, among derivatives of 12‐oxophytodienoic acid (PDA) carrying varying length of the carboxylic acid side‐chain, only those with a straight number of carbon atoms are able to induce JA responsive genes in barley leaves after treatment with these compounds. Barley leaves stressed by treatment with sorbitol solutions exhibit mainly an endogenous rise of JA and JA amino acid conjugates suggesting that both of them are stress signals. Data on organ‐ and tissue‐specific JA‐responsive gene expression will be presented and discussed in terms of “JA as a master switch” among various lipid‐derived signals.
Bücher und Buchkapitel

Ziegler, J.; Hamberg, M.; Miersch, O.; Allene Oxide Cyclase from Corn: Partial Purification and Characterization 99-101, (1997) DOI: 10.1007/978-94-017-2662-7_32

In plants, the oxylipin pathway gives rise to several oxygenated fatty acid derivatives such as hydroxy- and keto fatty acids as well as volatile aldehydes and cyclic compounds, which are, in part, physiologically active [1]. Among these, jasmonic acid is discussed as signalling molecule during several stress responses, wounding, senescense and plant pathogen interactions [2].
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