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Publikationen - Molekulare Signalverarbeitung

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Bücher und Buchkapitel

Hellmuth, A.; Calderón Villalobos, L. I. A. Radioligand Binding Assays for Determining Dissociation Constants of Phytohormone Receptors (Lois, L. M.; Matthiesen, R. ). Meth. Mol. Biol 1450, 23-34, (2016) ISBN: 978-1-4939-3757-8 DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4939-3759-2_3

In receptor–ligand interactions, dissociation constants provide a key parameter for characterizing binding. Here, we describe filter-based radioligand binding assays at equilibrium, either varying ligand concentrations up to receptor saturation or outcompeting ligand from its receptor with increasing concentrations of ligand analogue. Using the auxin coreceptor system, we illustrate how to use a saturation binding assay to determine the apparent dissociation constant (K D ′ ) for the formation of a ternary TIR1–auxin–AUX/IAA complex. Also, we show how to determine the inhibitory constant (K i) for auxin binding by the coreceptor complex via a competition binding assay. These assays can be applied broadly to characterize a one-site binding reaction of a hormone to its receptor.
Bücher und Buchkapitel

Yamaguchi, I.; Cohen, J.D.; Culler, A.H.; Quint, M.; Slovin, J.P.; Nakajima, M.; Sakakibara, H.; Kuroha, T.; Hirai, N.; Yokota, T.; Ohta, H.; Kabayashi, Y.; Mori, H.; Sakagami, Y. Plant Hormones (Lew Mander and Hung-Wen (Ben) Liu). Comprehensive Natural Products II, Elsevier, Oxford 9-125, (2010)

The definition of a plant hormone has not been clearly established, so the compounds classified as plant hormones often vary depending on which definition is considered. In this chapter, auxins, gibberellins (GAs), cytokinins, abscisic acid, brassinosteroids, jasmonic acid-related compounds, and ethylene are described as established plant hormones, while polyamines and phenolic compounds are not included. On the other hand, several peptides that have been proven to play a clear physiological role(s) in plant growth and development, similar to the established plant hormones, are referred. This chapter will focus primarily on the more recent discoveries of plant hormones and their impact on our current understanding of their biological role. In some cases, however, it is critical to place recent work in a proper historical context.
Publikation

Schilling, S.; Stenzel, I.; von Bohlen, A.; Wermann, M.; Schulz, K.; Demuth, H.-U.; Wasternack, C. Isolation and characterization of the glutaminyl cyclases from <i>Solanum tuberosum</i> and <i>Arabidopsis thaliana</i>: implications for physiological functions Biol. Chem 388, 145-153, (2007)

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Publikation

Wasternack, C.; Stenzel, I.; Hause, B.; Hause, G.; Kutter, C.; Maucher, H.; Neumerkel, J.; Feussner, I.; Miersch, O. The wound response in tomato - Role of jasmonic acid J. Plant Physiol 163, 297-306 , (2006)

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Publikation

Quint, M.; Gray, W.M. Auxin signaling Curr Opin Plant Biol 9, 448-453, (2006)

Auxin regulates a host of plant developmental and physiological processes, including embryogenesis, vascular differentiation, organogenesis, tropic growth, and root and shoot architecture. Genetic and biochemical studies carried out over the past decade have revealed that much of this regulation involves the SCFTIR1/AFB-mediated proteolysis of the Aux/IAA family of transcriptional regulators. With the recent finding that the TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESPONSE1 (TIR1)/AUXIN SIGNALING F-BOX (AFB) proteins also function as auxin receptors, a potentially complete, and surprisingly simple, signaling pathway from perception to transcriptional response is now before us. However, understanding how this seemingly simple pathway controls the myriad of specific auxin responses remains a daunting challenge, and compelling evidence exists for SCFTIR1/AFB-independent auxin signaling pathways.
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