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Publikationen - Molekulare Signalverarbeitung

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Publikation

Jablonická, V.; Ziegler, J.; Vatehová, Z.; Lišková, D.; Heilmann, I.; Obložinský, M.; Heilmann, M. Inhibition of phospholipases influences the metabolism of wound-induced benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in Papaver somniferum L. J Plant Physiol 223, 1-8, (2018) DOI: 10.1016/j.jplph.2018.01.007

Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs) are important secondary plant metabolites and include medicinally relevant drugs, such as morphine or codeine. As the de novo synthesis of BIA backbones is (still) unfeasible, to date the opium poppy plant Papaver somniferum L. represents the main source of BIAs. The formation of BIAs is induced in poppy plants by stress conditions, such as wounding or salt treatment; however, the details about regulatory processes controlling BIA formation in opium poppy are not well studied. Environmental stresses, such as wounding or salinization, are transduced in plants by phospholipid-based signaling pathways, which involve different classes of phospholipases. Here we investigate whether pharmacological inhibition of phospholipase A2 (PLA2, inhibited by aristolochic acid (AA)) or phospholipase D (PLD; inhibited by 5-fluoro-2-indolyl des-chlorohalopemide (FIPI)) in poppy plants influences wound-induced BIA accumulation and the expression of key biosynthetic genes. We show that inhibition of PLA2 results in increased morphinan biosynthesis concomitant with reduced production of BIAs of the papaverine branch, whereas inhibition of PLD results in increased production of BIAs of the noscapine branch. The data suggest that phospholipid-dependent signaling pathways contribute to the activation of morphine biosynthesis at the expense of the production of other BIAs in poppy plants. A better understanding of the effectors and the principles of regulation of alkaloid biosynthesis might be the basis for the future genetic modification of opium poppy to optimize BIA production.
Publikation

Guranowski, A.; Miersch, O.; Staswick, P.E.; Suza, W.; Wasternack, C. Substrate specificity and products of side-reactions catalyzed by jasmonate:amino acid synthetase (JAR1) FEBS Letters 581, 815-820, (2007)

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Publikation

Abel, S.; Savchenko, T.; Levy, M. Genome-wide comparative analysis of the <em>IQD</em> gene families in <em>Arabidopsis thaliana</em> and Oryza sativa BMC Evolutionary Biology 5, 72 (1-25), (2005)

We identified and analyzed 33 and 29 IQD1-like genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa, respectively. The encoded IQD proteins contain a plant-specific domain of 67 conserved amino acid residues, referred to as the IQ67 domain, which is characterized by a unique and repetitive arrangement of three different calmodulin recruitment motifs, known as the IQ, 1-5-10, and 1-8-14 motifs. We demonstrated calmodulin binding for IQD20, the smallest IQD protein in Arabidopsis, which consists of a C-terminal IQ67 domain and a short N-terminal extension. A striking feature of IQD proteins is the high isoelectric point (~10.3) and frequency of serine residues (~11%). We compared the Arabidopsis and rice IQD gene families in terms of gene structure, chromosome location, predicted protein properties and motifs, phylogenetic relationships, and evolutionary history. The existence of an IQD-like gene in bryophytes suggests that IQD proteins are an ancient family of calmodulin-binding proteins and arose during the early evolution of land plants. Comparative phylogenetic analyses indicate that the major IQD gene lineages originated before the monocot-eudicot divergence. The extant IQD loci in Arabidopsis primarily resulted from segmental duplication and reflect preferential retention of paralogous genes, which is characteristic for proteins with regulatory functions. Interaction of IQD1 and IQD20 with calmodulin and the presence of predicted calmodulin binding sites in all IQD family members suggest that IQD proteins are a new class of calmodulin targets. The basic isoelectric point of IQD proteins and their frequently predicted nuclear localization suggest that IQD proteins link calcium signaling pathways to the regulation of gene expression. Our comparative genomics analysis of IQD genes and encoded proteins in two model plant species provides the first step towards the functional dissection of this emerging family of putative calmodulin targets.
Publikation

Flores, R.; Delgado, S.; Gas, M.E.; Carbonell, A.; Molina, D.; Gago, S.; de la Peña, M. Viroids: the minimal non-coding RNA's with autonomous replication FEBS Letters 567, 42-48, (2004)

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Publikation

Morgan, K.E.; Zarembinski, T.I.; Theologis, A.; Abel, S. Biochemical characterization of recombinant polypeptides corresponding to the predicted ßαα-fold in Aux/IAA proteins FEBS Letters 454, 283-287, (1999)

The plant hormone indoleacetic acid (IAA or auxin) transcriptionally activates a select set of early genes. The Auxl IAA class of early auxin-responsive genes encodes a large family of short-lived, nuclear proteins. Aux/IAA polypeptides homo-and heterodimerize, and interact with auxin-response transcription factors (ARFs) via C-terminal regions conserved in both protein families. This shared region contains a predicted βαα motif similar to the prokaryotic β-Ribbon DNA binding domain, which mediates both protein dimerization and DNA recognition. Here, we show by circular dichroism spectroscopy and by chemical cross-linking experiments that recombinant peptides corresponding to the predicted βαα region of three Aux/IAA proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana contain substantial α-helical secondary structure and undergo homo- and heterotypic interactions in vitro. Our results indicate a similar biochemical function of the plant βαα domain and suggest that the βαα fold plays an important role in mediating combinatorial interactions of Aux/IAA and ARF proteins to specifically regulate secondary gene expression in response to auxin.
Publikation

Bohlmann, H.; Vignutelli, A.; Hilpert, B.; Miersch, O.; Wasternack, C.; Apel, K. Wounding and chemicals induce expression of the Arabidopsis gene Thi2.1, encoding a fungal defense thionin, via the octadecanoid pathway FEBS Letters 437, 281-286, (1998)

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Publikation

Hertel, S.; Knöfel, H.-D.; Kramell, R.; Miersch, O. Partial purification and characterization of a jasmonic acid conjugate cleaving amidohydrolase from the fungus <EM>Botryodiplodia theobromae</EM> FEBS Letters 407, 105-110, (1997)

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Publikation

Görschen, E.; Dunaeva, M.; Reeh, I.; Wasternack, C. Overexpression of the jasmonate inducible 23 kDa protein (JIP 23) from barley in transgenic tobacco leads to the repression of leaf proteins FEBS Letters 419, 58-62, (1997)

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Publikation

Feussner, K.; Feussner, I.; Leopold, I.; Wasternack, C. Isolation of a cDNA coding for an ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UBCI of tomato - the first stress-induced UBC of higher plants FEBS Letters 409, 211-215, (1997)

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Publikation

Feussner, I.; Kühn, H.; Wasternack, C. Hypothesis. Do specific linoleate 13-lipoxygenases initiate b-oxidation? FEBS Letters 406, 1-5, (1997)

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