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Publikationen - Molekulare Signalverarbeitung

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Publikation

Wasternack, C.; Termination in Jasmonate Signaling by MYC2 and MTBs Trends Plant Sci. 24, 667-669, (2019) DOI: 10.1016/j.tplants.2019.06.001

Jasmonic acid (JA) signaling can be switched off by metabolism of JA. The master regulator MYC2, interacting with MED25, has been shown to be deactivated by the bHLH transcription factors MTB1, MTB2, and MTB3. An autoregulatory negative feedback loop has been proposed for this termination in JA signaling.
Publikation

Wasternack, C.; New Light on Local and Systemic Wound Signaling Trends Plant Sci. 24, 102-105, (2019) DOI: 10.1016/j.tplants.2018.11.009

Electric signaling and Ca2+ waves were discussed to occur in systemic wound responses. Two new overlapping scenarios were identified: (i) membrane depolarization in two special cell types followed by an increase in systemic cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt), and (ii) glutamate sensed by GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR LIKE proteins and followed by Ca2+-based defense in distal leaves.
Publikation

Wasternack, C.; Hause, B.; A Bypass in Jasmonate Biosynthesis – the OPR3-independent Formation Trends Plant Sci. 23, 276-279, (2018) DOI: 10.1016/j.tplants.2018.02.011

For the first time in 25 years, a new pathway for biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (JA) has been identified. JA production takes place via 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) including reduction by OPDA reductases (OPRs). A loss-of-function allele, opr3-3, revealed an OPR3-independent pathway converting OPDA to JA.
Publikation

Wasternack, C.; Perception, signaling and cross-talk of jasmonates and the seminal contributions of the Daoxin Xie’s lab and the Chuanyou Li’s lab Plant Cell Rep. 33, 707-718, (2014) DOI: 10.1007/s00299-014-1608-5

Jasmonates (JAs) are lipid-derived signals in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses and in development. The most active JA compound is (+)-7-iso-JA-Ile, a JA conjugate with isoleucine. Biosynthesis, metabolism and key components of perception and signal transduction have been identified and numerous JA-induced gene expression data collected. For JA-Ile perception, the SCFCOI1–JAZ co-receptor complex has been identified and crystalized. Activators such as MYC2 and repressors such as JAZs including their targets were found. Involvement of JA-Ile in response to herbivores and pathogens and in root growth inhibition is among the most studied aspects of JA-Ile signaling. There are an increasing number of examples, where JA-Ile shows cross-talk with other plant hormones. Seminal contributions in JA/JA-Ile research were given by Daoxin Xie’s lab and Chuanyou Li’s lab, both in Beijing. Here, characterization was done regarding components of the JA-Ile receptor, such as COI1 (JAI1) and SCF, regarding activators (MYCs, MYBs) and repressors (JAV1, bHLH IIId’s) of JA-regulated gene expression, as well as regarding components of auxin biosynthesis and action, such as the transcription factor PLETHORA active in the root stem cell niche. This overview reflects the work of both labs in the light of our present knowledge on biosynthesis, perception and signal transduction of JA/JA-Ile and its cross-talk to other hormones.
Publikation

Feussner, I.; Kühn, H.; Wasternack, C.; Lipoxygenase-dependent degradation of storage lipids Trends Plant Sci. 6, 268-273, (2001) DOI: 10.1016/S1360-1385(01)01950-1

Oilseed germination is characterized by the mobilization of storage lipids as a carbon source for the germinating seedling. In spite of the importance of lipid mobilization, its mechanism is only partially understood. Recent data suggest that a novel degradation mechanism is initiated by a 13-lipoxygenase during germination, using esterified fatty acids specifically as substrates. This 13-lipoxygenase reaction leads to a transient accumulation of ester lipid hydroperoxides in the storage lipids, and the corresponding oxygenated fatty acid moieties are preferentially removed by specific lipases. The free hydroperoxy fatty acids are subsequently reduced to their hydroxy derivatives, which might in turn undergo β-oxidation.
Publikation

Kramell, R.; Porzel, A.; Miersch, O.; Schneider, G.; Wasternack, C.; Chromatographic resolution of peptide-like conjugates of jasmonic acid and of cucurbic acid isomers J. Chromatogr. A 847, 103-107, (1999) DOI: 10.1016/S0021-9673(99)00335-0

The chiral separation of peptide-like conjugates of jasmonic acid and of cucurbic acid isomers was investigated by liquid chromatography on Chiralpak AS and Nucleodex β-PM. The retention sequences reflect distinct chromatographic properties with respect to the chirality of the jasmonic acid part or of the cucurbic acid isomers. The chromatographic behaviour of the amide conjugates on a reversed-phase C18 column provides evidence for the resolution of diastereomeric conjugates depending on the chirality of both constituents of the conjugate molecule. The chromatographic procedures are suitable for the analytical and preparative separation of such conjugates.
Publikation

Wasternack, C.; Parthier, B.; Jasmonate-signalled plant gene expression Trends Plant Sci. 2, 302-307, (1997) DOI: 10.1016/S1360-1385(97)89952-9

Jasmonic acid is distributed throughout higher plants, synthesized from linolenic acid via the octadecanoic pathway. An important and probably essential role seems to be its operation as a ‘master switch’, responsible for the activation of signal transduction pathways in response to predation and pathogen attack. Proteins encoded by jasmonate-induced genes include enzymes of alkaloid and phytoalexin synthesis, storage proteins, cell wall constituents and stress protectants. The wound-induced formation of proteinase inhibitors is a well-studied example, in which jasmonic acid combines with abscisic acid and ethylene to protect the plant from predation.
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