zur Suche springenzur Navigation springenzum Inhalt springen

Publikationen - Molekulare Signalverarbeitung

Sortieren nach: sort ascending Erscheinungsjahr Typ der Publikation

Zeige Ergebnisse 1 bis 10 von 18.

Publikation

Lehmann, J.; Atzorn, R.; Brückner, C.; Reinbothe, S.; Leopold, J.; Wasternack, C.; Parthier, B.; Accumulation of jasmonate, abscisic acid, specific transcripts and proteins in osmotically stressed barley leaf segments Planta 197, 156-192, (1995) DOI: 10.1007/BF00239952

The accumulation of abundant proteins and their respective transcripts, induced by 10−4 M cisabscisic acid or 10−5 M jasmonic acid methyl ester, was studied in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) leaf segments and compared to that resulting from osmotic stress caused by floating the segments on solutions of sorbitol, glucose, polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-6000 or NaCl. Osmotic stress or treatment with abscisic acid led to the synthesis of novel proteins which were identical to jasmonateinduced proteins (JIPs) with respect to immunological properties and molecular masses. The most prominent polypeptides were characterized by molecular masses of 66, 37 and 23 kDa and were newly synthesized. Whereas sorbitol, mannitol, sucrose, glucose and PEG provoked the synthesis of JIPs, 2deoxyglucose and NaCl did not. We provide evidence that the synthesis of JIPs induced by osmotic stress is directly correlated with a preceding rise in endogenous jasmonates. These jasmonates, quantified by an enzyme immunoassay specific for (−)jasmonic acid and its aminoacid conjugates, increased remarkably in leaf segments treated with sorbitol, glucose or other sugars. In contrast, no increase in jasmonates could be observed in tissues exposed to salts (NaCl). The results strengthen the hypothesis that the accumulation of jasmonates, probably by de-novo synthesis, is an intermediate and essential step in a signalling pathway between (osmotic) stress and activation of genes coding for polypeptides of high abundance.
Publikation

Feussner, I.; Hause, B.; Nellen, A.; Wasternack, C.; Kindl, H.; Lipid-body lipoxygenase is expressed in cotyledons during germination prior to other lipoxygenase forms Planta 198, 288-293, (1996) DOI: 10.1007/BF00206255

Lipid bodies are degraded during germination. Whereas some proteins, e.g. oleosins, are synthesized during the formation of lipid bodies of maturating seeds, a new set of proteins, including a specific form of lipoxygenase (LOX; EC 1.13.11.12), is detectable in lipid bodies during the stage of fat degradation in seed germination. In cotyledons of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings at day 4 of germination, the most conspicuous staining with anti-LOX antibodies was observed in the cytosol. At very early stages of germination, however, the LOX form present in large amounts and synthesized preferentially was the lipid-body LOX. This was demonstrated by immunocytochemical staining of cotyledons from 1-h and 24-h-old seedlings: the immunodecoration of sections of 24-h-old seedlings with anti-LOX antiserum showed label exclusively correlated with lipid bodies of around 3 μm in diameter. In accordance, the profile of LOX protein isolated from lipid bodies during various stages of germination showed a maximum at day 1. By measuring biosynthesis of the protein in vivo we demonstrated that the highest rates of synthesis of lipid-body LOX occurred at day 1 of germination. The early and selective appearance of a LOX form associated with lipid bodies at this stage of development is discussed.
Publikation

Peña-Cortés, H.; Prat, S.; Atzorn, R.; Wasternack, C.; Willmitzer, L.; Abscisic acid-deficient plants do not accumulate proteinase inhibitor II following systemin treatment Planta 198, 447-451, (1996) DOI: 10.1007/BF00620062

The role of systemin in Pin2 gene expression was analyzed in wild-type plants of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), as well as in abscisic acid (ABA)-deficient tomato (sitiens) and potato (droopy) plants. The results showed that systemin initiates Pin2 mRNA accumulation only in wildtype tomato and potato plants. As in the situation after mechanical wounding,Pin2 gene expression in ABA-deficient plants was not activated by systemin. Increased endogenous levels of jasmonic acid (JA) and accumulation of Pin2 mRNA were observed following treatment with α-linolenic acid, the precursor of JA biosynthesis, suggesting that these ABA mutants still have the capability to synthesize de novo JA. Measurement of endogenous levels of ABA and JA showed that systemin leads to an increase of both phytohormones (ABA and JA) only in wild-type but not in ABA-deficient plants.
Publikation

Görschen, E.; Dunaeva, M.; Hause, B.; Reeh, I.; Wasternack, C.; Parthier, B.; Expression of the ribosome-inactivating protein JIP60 from barley in transgenic tobacco leads to an abnormal phenotype and alterations on the level of translation Planta 202, 470-478, (1997) DOI: 10.1007/s004250050151

In this paper we report the in-planta activity of the ribosome-inactivating protein JIP60, a 60-kDa jasmonate-induced protein from barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants. All plants expressing the complete JIP60 cDNA under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter exhibited conspicuous and similar phenotypic alterations, such as slower growth, shorter internodes, lanceolate leaves, reduced root development, and premature senescence of leaves. Microscopic inspection of developing leaves showed a loss of residual meristems and higher degree of vacuolation of mesophyll cells as compared to the wild type. When probed with an antiserum which was immunoreactive against both the N- and the C-terminal half of JIP60, a polypeptide with a molecular mass of about 30 kDa, most probably a processed JIP60 product, could be detected. Phenotypic alterations could be correlated with the differences in the detectable amount of the JIP60 mRNA and processed JIP60 protein. The protein biosynthesis of the transformants was characterized by an increased polysome/monosome ratio but a decreased in-vivo translation activity. These findings suggest that JIP60 perturbs the translation machinery in planta. An immunohistological analysis using the JIP60 antiserum indicated that the immunoreactive polypeptide(s) are located mainly in the nucleus of transgenic tobacco leaf cells and to a minor extent in the cytoplasm.
Publikation

Chen, D. L.; Delatorre, C. A.; Bakker, A.; Abel, S.; Conditional identification of phosphate-starvation-response mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana Planta 211, 13-22, (2000) DOI: 10.1007/s004250000271

Plants have evolved elaborate metabolic and developmental adaptations to low phosphorus availability. Biochemical responses to phosphate limitation include increased production and secretion of phosphate-acquisition proteins such as nucleases, acid phosphatases, and high-affinity phosphate transporters. However, the signal transduction pathways that sense phosphate availability and integrate the phosphate-starvation response in plants are unknown. We have devised a screen for conditional mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. to dissect signaling of phosphate limitation. Our genetic screen is based on the facultative ability of wild-type Arabidopsis plants to metabolize exogenous DNA when inorganic phosphate is limiting. After screening 50,000 M2 seedlings, we isolated 22 confirmed mutant lines that showed severely impaired growth on medium containing DNA as the only source of phosphorus, but which recovered on medium containing soluble inorganic phosphate. Characterization of nine such mutant lines demonstrated an inability to utilize either DNA or RNA. One mutant line, psr1 (phosphate starvation response), had significantly reduced activities of phosphate-starvation-inducible isoforms of ribonuclease and acid phosphatase under phosphate-limiting conditions. The data suggest that a subset of the selected mutations impairs the expression of more than one phosphate-starvation-inducible enzyme required for utilization of exogenous nucleic acids, and may thus affect regulatory components of a Pi starvation response pathway in higher plants.
Publikation

Quint, M.; Melchinger, A. E.; Dußle, C. M.; Lübberstedt, T.; Breeding for virus resistance in maize Genetika 32, 529-545, (2000)

Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) is an important disease in maize, which is emerging in Germany since 1983. Using this pest as a model for the inheritance of oligogenic traits, we clarified the genetic ba­sis for resistance in early maturing European maize germplasm. Screening of 122 adapted European inbred lines identified three completely resistant lines, which were used for further analyses. The genetics of SCMV resis­tance was investigated by allelism tests in field experiments combined with QTL and bulked segregant analyses (BSA) on the marker level. QTL analyses revealed the presence of two major genes Scm1 and Scm2 plus three minor QTL. Involvement of Scm1 and Scm2 in the inheritance of SCMV resistance could be confirmed by BSA in a second cross. Breeders can make use of tightly linked STS markers for marker-assisted selection (MAS) as well as our SCMV resistant flint lines to improve their elite germplasm. Currently, recurrent backcrossing with phenotypic selection is the most appropriate and cost effective breeding method. With de­creasing costs of DNA chip technology, MAS can be competitive with phenotypic selection in the near future. Further objectives of our research are the isolation and cloning of Scm1 and Scm2. To achieve this goal we follow two different approaches. (1) Positional cloning based on more than 500 AFLP primer combinations resulted in Scm1/Scm2 specific markers with a resolution of approximately 0.2 cM in the respective re­gions. (2) Resistance gene analogues (RGAs), cosegregating with the tar­get genes are used to identify further candidate genes for transformation experiments.
Publikation

BERGER, S.; Weichert, H.; Porzel, A.; Wasternack, C.; Kühn, H.; Feussner, I.; Enzymatic and non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation in leaf development BBA-Mol. Cell Biol. Lipids 1533, 266-276, (2001) DOI: 10.1016/S1388-1981(01)00161-5

Enzymatic and non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation has been implicated in programmed cell death, which is a major process of leaf senescence. To test this hypothesis we developed a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for a simultaneous analysis of the major hydro(pero)xy polyenoic fatty acids. Quantities of lipid peroxidation products in leaves of different stages of development including natural senescence indicated a strong increase in the level of oxygenated polyenoic fatty acids (PUFAs) during the late stages of leaf senescence. Comprehensive structural elucidation of the oxygenation products by means of HPLC, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance suggested a non-enzymatic origin. However, in some cases a small share of specifically oxidized PUFAs was identified suggesting involvement of lipid peroxidizing enzymes. To inspect the possible role of enzymatic lipid peroxidation in leaf senescence, we analyzed the abundance of lipoxygenases (LOXs) in rosette leaves of Arabidopsis. LOXs and their product (9Z,11E,13S,15Z)-13-hydroperoxy-9,11,15-octadecatrienoic acid were exclusively detected in young green leaves. In contrast, in senescing leaves the specific LOX products were overlaid by large amounts of stereo-random lipid peroxidation products originating from non-enzymatic oxidation. These data indicate a limited contribution of LOXs to total lipid peroxidation, and a dominant role of non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation in late stages of leaf development.
Publikation

Weichert, H.; Kolbe, A.; Kraus, A.; Wasternack, C.; Feussner, I.; Metabolic profiling of oxylipins in germinating cucumber seedlings - lipoxygenase-dependent degradation of triacylglycerols and biosynthesis of volatile aldehydes Planta 215, 612-619, (2002) DOI: 10.1007/s00425-002-0779-4

A particular isoform of lipoxygenase (LOX) localized on lipid bodies was shown by earlier investigations to play a role in initiating the mobilization of triacylglycerols during seed germination. Here, further physiological functions of LOXs within whole cotyledons of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) were analyzed by measuring the endogenous amounts of LOX-derived products. The lipid-body LOX-derived esterified (13S)-hydroperoxy linoleic acid was the dominant metabolite of the LOX pathway in this tissue. It accumulated to about 14 µmol/g fresh weight, which represented about 6% of the total amount of linoleic acid in cotyledons. This LOX product was not only reduced to its hydroxy derivative, leading to degradation by β-oxidation, but alternatively it was metabolized by fatty acid hydroperoxide lyase leading to formation of hexanal as well. Furthermore, the activities of LOX forms metabolizing linolenic acid were detected by measuring the accumulation of volatile aldehydes and the allene oxide synthase-derived metabolite jasmonic acid. The first evidence is presented for an involvement of a lipid-body LOX form in the production of volatile aldehydes.
Publikation

Nibbe, M.; Hilpert, B.; Wasternack, C.; Miersch, O.; Apel, K.; Cell death and salicylate- and jasmonate-dependent stress responses in Arabidopsis are controlled by single cet genes Planta 216, 120-128, (2002) DOI: 10.1007/s00425-002-0907-1

The jasmonic acid (JA)-dependent regulation of the Thi2.1 gene had previously been exploited for setting up a genetic screen for the isolation of signal transduction mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. that constitutively express the thionin gene. Several cet mutants had been isolated which showed a constitutive expression of the thionin gene. These cet mutants, except for one, also showed spontaneous leaf cell necrosis and were up-regulated in the expression of the PR1 gene, reactions often associated with the systemic acquired resistance (SAR) pathway. Four of these cet mutants, cet1, cet2, cet3 and cet4.1 were crossed with the fad triple and coi1 mutants that are blocked at two steps within the JA-dependent signaling pathway, and with transgenic NahG plants that are deficient in salicylic acid (SA) and are unable to activate SAR. Analysis of the various double-mutant lines revealed that the four cet genes act within a signaling cascade at or prior to branch points from which not only JA-dependent signals but also SA-dependent signaling and cell death pathways diverge.
Publikation

Köck, M.; Groß, N.; Stenzel, I.; Hause, G.; Phloem-specific expression of the wound-inducible ribonuclease LE from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Lukullus) Planta 219, 233-242, (2004) DOI: 10.1007/s00425-004-1227-4

Ribonuclease LE (RNaseLE) from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Lukullus) belongs to the widespread RNase T2 family of ribonucleases. With the exception of S-RNases of the solanaceous self-incompatibility system the functions of other members of the RNase T2 family are only barely understood. Using a 2.6-kbp putative promoter sequence of RNaseLE in front of the uidA reporter gene, expression of β-glucuronidase in developing phloem tissue and, especially, in the meristematic and elongation zones at root tips was detected. The tissue-specific expression accords with the range of cis-acting elements detected in the RNaseLE promoter. RNaseLE mRNA was localized in developing phloem cells but not in mature phloem tissue, suggesting association of RNaseLE expression with phloem development. Histochemical staining of β-glucuronidase activity as well as detailed inspection of RNaseLE at mRNA, protein and enzyme activity levels revealed that the wound-induced expression of RNaseLE was also restricted to vascular tissue. RNaseLE transcript accumulation detected by in situ hybridization occurred preferentially in phloem and cambial cells of stem sections upon wounding. The data provide evidence for a role of RNaseLE in a tissue-specific wound response and in wound healing of tomato.
IPB Mainnav Search