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Publikation

Floková, K.; Tarkowská, D.; Miersch, O.; Strnad, M.; Wasternack, C.; Novak, O. UHPLC-MS/MS based target profiling of stress-induced phytohormones Phytochemistry 105, 147-157, (2014) DOI: 10.1016/j.phytochem.2014.05.015

Stress-induced changes in phytohormone metabolite profiles have rapid effects on plant metabolic activity and growth. The jasmonates (JAs) are a group of fatty acid-derived stress response regulators with roles in numerous developmental processes. To elucidate their dual regulatory effects, which overlap with those of other important defence-signalling plant hormones such as salicylic acid (SA), abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), we have developed a highly efficient single-step clean-up procedure for their enrichment from complex plant matrices that enables their sensitive quantitative analysis using hyphenated mass spectrometry technique. The rapid extraction of minute quantities of plant material (less than 20 mg fresh weight, FW) into cold 10% methanol followed by one-step reversed-phase polymer-based solid phase extraction significantly reduced matrix effects and increased the recovery of labile JA analytes. This extraction and purification protocol was paired with a highly sensitive and validated ultra-high performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC–MS/MS) method and used to simultaneously profile sixteen stress-induced phytohormones in minute plant material samples, including endogenous JA, several of its biosynthetic precursors and derivatives, as well as SA, ABA and IAA.
Publikation

Calderon-Villalobos, L. I.; Tan, X.; Zheng, N.; Estelle, M. Auxin Perception—Structural Insights Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol 2, a005546, (2010) DOI: 10.1101/cshperspect.a005546

The identity of the auxin receptor(s) and the mechanism of auxin perception has been a subject of intense interest since the discovery of auxin almost a century ago. The development of genetic approaches to the study of plant hormone signaling led to the discovery that auxin acts by promoting degradation of transcriptional repressors called Aux/IAA proteins. This process requires a ubiquitin protein ligase (E3) called SCFTIR1 and related SCF complexes. Surprisingly, auxin works by directly binding to TIR1, the F-box protein subunit of this SCF. Structural studies demonstrate that auxin acts like a molecular glue, to stabilize the interaction between TIR1 and the Aux/IAA substrate. These exciting results solve an old problem in plant biology and reveal new mechanisms for E3 regulation and hormone perception.
Bücher und Buchkapitel

Yamaguchi, I.; Cohen, J. D.; Culler, A. H.; Quint, M.; Slovin, J. P.; Nakajima, M.; Yamaguchi, S.; Sakakibara, H.; Kuroha, T.; Hirai, N.; Yokota, T.; Ohta, H.; Kobayashi, Y.; Mori, H.; Sakagami, Y. Plant Hormones (Liu, H.-W. & Mander, L., eds.). Comprehensive Natural Products II 4, 9-125, (2010) ISBN: 978-0-08-045382-8 DOI: 10.1016/B978-008045382-8.00092-7

The definition of a plant hormone has not been clearly established, so the compounds classified as plant hormones often vary depending on which definition is considered. In this chapter, auxins, gibberellins (GAs), cytokinins, abscisic acid, brassinosteroids, jasmonic acid-related compounds, and ethylene are described as established plant hormones, while polyamines and phenolic compounds are not included. On the other hand, several peptides that have been proven to play a clear physiological role(s) in plant growth and development, similar to the established plant hormones, are referred. This chapter will focus primarily on the more recent discoveries of plant hormones and their impact on our current understanding of their biological role. In some cases, however, it is critical to place recent work in a proper historical context.
Publikation

Abel, S.; Theologis, A. Odyssey of Auxin Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol 2, a004572, (2010) DOI: 10.1101/cshperspect.a004572

The history of plant biology is inexorably intertwined with the conception and discovery of auxin, followed by the many decades of research to comprehend its action during growth and development. Growth responses to auxin are complex and require the coordination of auxin production, transport, and perception. In this overview of past auxin research, we limit our discourse to the mechanism of auxin action. We attempt to trace the almost epic voyage from the birth of the hormonal concept in plants to the recent crystallographic studies that resolved the TIR1-auxin receptor complex, the first structural model of a plant hormone receptor. The century-long endeavor is a beautiful illustration of the power of scientific reasoning and human intuition, but it also brings to light the fact that decisive progress is made when new technologies emerge and disciplines unite.
Publikation

Schilling, S.; Hoffmann, T.; Rosche, F.; Manhart, S.; Wasternack, C.; Demuth, H.-U. Heterologous expression and characterization of human glutaminyl cyclase: evidence for a disulfide bond with importance for catalytic activity Biochemistry 41, 10849-10857, (2002)

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