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Publikationen - Molekulare Signalverarbeitung

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Publikation

Wasternack, C.; Termination in Jasmonate Signaling by MYC2 and MTBs Trends Plant Sci. 24, 667-669, (2019) DOI: 10.1016/j.tplants.2019.06.001

Jasmonic acid (JA) signaling can be switched off by metabolism of JA. The master regulator MYC2, interacting with MED25, has been shown to be deactivated by the bHLH transcription factors MTB1, MTB2, and MTB3. An autoregulatory negative feedback loop has been proposed for this termination in JA signaling.
Publikation

Wasternack, C.; New Light on Local and Systemic Wound Signaling Trends Plant Sci. 24, 102-105, (2019) DOI: 10.1016/j.tplants.2018.11.009

Electric signaling and Ca2+ waves were discussed to occur in systemic wound responses. Two new overlapping scenarios were identified: (i) membrane depolarization in two special cell types followed by an increase in systemic cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt), and (ii) glutamate sensed by GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR LIKE proteins and followed by Ca2+-based defense in distal leaves.
Publikation

Wasternack, C.; Hause, B.; A Bypass in Jasmonate Biosynthesis – the OPR3-independent Formation Trends Plant Sci. 23, 276-279, (2018) DOI: 10.1016/j.tplants.2018.02.011

For the first time in 25 years, a new pathway for biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (JA) has been identified. JA production takes place via 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) including reduction by OPDA reductases (OPRs). A loss-of-function allele, opr3-3, revealed an OPR3-independent pathway converting OPDA to JA.
Bücher und Buchkapitel

Wasternack, C.; Jasmonates: Synthesis, Metabolism, Signal Transduction and Action (2016) DOI: 10.1002/9780470015902.a0020138.pub2

Jasmonic acid and other fatty‐acid‐derived compounds called oxylipins are signals in stress responses and development of plants. The receptor complex, signal transduction components as well as repressors and activators in jasmonate‐induced gene expression have been elucidated. Different regulatory levels and cross‐talk with other hormones are responsible for the multiplicity of plant responses to environmental and developmental cues.
Bücher und Buchkapitel

Wasternack, C.; Jasmonates in Plant Growth and Stress Responses (Tran, L.-S. P. & Pal, S., eds.). 221-263, (2014) ISBN: 978-1-4939-0491-4 DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4939-0491-4_8

Jasmonates are lipid-derived compounds which are signals in plant stress responses and development. They are synthesized in chloroplasts and peroxisomes. An endogenous rise occurs upon environmental stimuli or in distinct stages of development such as that of anthers and trichomes or in root growth. Hydroxylation, carboxylation, glucosylation, sulfation, methylation, or conjugation of jasmonic acid (JA) leads to numerous metabolites. Many of them are at least partially biologically inactive. The most bioactive JA is the (+)-7-iso-JA–isoleucine conjugate. Its perception takes place by the SCFCOI1-JAZ-co-receptor complex. At elevated levels of JAs, negative regulators such as JAZ, or JAV are subjected to proteasomal degradation, thereby allowing positively acting transcription factors of the MYC or MYB family to switch on JA-induced gene expression. In case of JAM negative regulation takes place by anatagonism to MYC2. JA and COI1 are dominant signals in gene expression after wounding or in response to necrotrophic pathogens. Cross-talk to salicylic acid, ethylene, auxin, and other hormones occurs. Growth is inhibited by JA, thereby counteracting the growth stimulation by gibberellic acid. Senescence, trichome formation, arbuscular mycorrhiza, and formation of many secondary metabolites are induced by jasmonates. Effects in cold acclimation; in intercropping; during response to herbivores, nematodes, or necrotrophic pathogens; in pre- and post-harvest; in crop quality control; and in biosynthesis of secondary compounds led to biotechnological and agricultural applications.
Publikation

Wasternack, C.; Hause, B.; Blütenduft, Abwehr, Entwicklung: Jasmonsäure - ein universelles Pflanzenhormon Biologie in unserer Zeit 44, 164-171, (2014) DOI: 10.1002/biuz.201410535

Pflanzen müssen gegen vielfältige biotische und abiotische Umwelteinflusse eine Abwehr aufbauen. Aber gleichzeitig müssen sie wachsen und sich vermehren. Jasmonate sind neben anderen Hormonen ein zentrales Signal bei der Etablierung von Abwehrmechanismen, aber auch Signal von Entwicklungsprozessen wie Blüten‐ und Trichombildung, sowie der Hemmung von Wachstum. Biosynthese und essentielle Komponenten der Signaltransduktion von JA und seinem biologisch aktiven Konjugat JA‐Ile sind gut untersucht. Der Rezeptor ist ein Proteinkomplex, der “JA‐Ile‐Wahrnehmung” mit proteasomalem Abbau von Repressorproteinen verbindet. Dadurch können positiv agierende Transkriptionsfaktoren wirksam werden und vielfältige Genexpressionsänderungen auslösen. Dies betrifft die Bildung von Abwehrproteinen, Enzymen der JA‐Biosynthese und Sekundärstoffbildung, und Proteinen von Signalketten und Entwicklungsprozessen. Die Kenntnisse zur JA‐Ile‐Wirkung werden in Landwirtschaft und Biotechnologie genutzt.
Bücher und Buchkapitel

Vaira, A. M.; Gago-Zachert, S.; Garcia, M. L.; Guerri, J.; Hammond, J.; Milne, R. G.; Moreno, P.; Morikawa, T.; Natsuaki, T.; Navarro, J. A.; Pallas, V.; Torok, V.; Verbeek, M.; Vetten, H. J.; Family - Ophioviridae (King, A. M. Q., et al., eds.). 743-748, (2012) DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-12-384684-6.00060-4

This chapter focuses on Ophioviridae family whose sole member genus is Ophiovirus. The member species of the genus include Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV), Freesia sneak virus(FreSV), Lettuce ring necrosis virus (LRNV), and Mirafiori lettuce big-vein virus (MiLBVV).The single stranded negative/possibly ambisense RNA genome is divided into 3–4 segments, each of which is encapsidated in a single coat protein (43–50 kDa) forming filamentous virions of about 3 nm in diameter, in shape of kinked or probably internally coiled circles of at least two different contour lengths. Ophioviruses can be mechanically transmitted to a limited range of test plants, inducing local lesions and systemic mottle. The natural hosts of CPsV, ranunculus white mottle virus (RWMV), MiLBVV, and LRNV are dicotyledonous plants of widely differing taxonomy. CPsV has a wide geographical distribution in citrus in the Americas, in the Mediterranean and in New Zealand. FreSV has been reported in two species of the family Ranunculacae from Northern Italy, and in lettuce in France and Germany. Tulip mild mottle mosaic virus (TMMMV) has been reported in tulips in Japan. LRNV is closely associated with lettuce ring necrosis disease in The Netherlands, Belgium, and France, and FreSV has been reported in Europe, Africa, North America and New Zealand.
Bücher und Buchkapitel

Wasternack, C.; Jasmonates in Stress, Growth, and Development 91-118, (2010) ISBN: 9783527628964 DOI: 10.1002/9783527628964.ch5

This chapter contains sections titled:IntroductionJA BiosynthesisJA MetabolismBound OPDA – ArabidopsidesMutants of JA Biosynthesis and SignalingCOI1–JAZ–JA‐Ile‐Mediated JA SignalingTranscription Factors Involved in JA SignalingJasmonates and Oxylipins in DevelopmentConclusionsAcknowledgmentsReferences
Bücher und Buchkapitel

Dorka, R.; Miersch, O.; Hause, B.; Weik, P.; Wasternack, C.; Chronobiologische Phänomene und Jasmonatgehalt bei Viscum album L. 49-66, (2009)

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Bücher und Buchkapitel

Wasternack, C.; Hause, B.; Stenzel, I.; Goetz, S.; Feussner, I.; Miersch, O.; Jasmonate signaling in tomato – The input of tissue-specific occurrence of allene oxide cyclase and JA metabolites (Benning C., Ollrogge, J.). 107-111, (2007)

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