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Publikationen - Molekulare Signalverarbeitung

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Bücher und Buchkapitel

Feussner, I.; Balkenhohl, T. J.; Porzel, A.; Kühn, H.; Wasternack, C.; Structural Elucidation of Oxygenated Triacylglycerols in Cucumber and Sunflower Cotyledons 57-58, (1998)

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Bücher und Buchkapitel

Balkenhohl, T.; Kühn, H.; Wasternack, C.; Feussner, I.; A Lipase Specific for Esterified Oxygenated Polyenoic Fatty Acids in Lipid Bodies of Cucumber Cotyledons 320-322, (1998)

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Publikation

Wasternack, C.; Miersch, O.; Kramell, R.; Hause, B.; Ward, J.; Beale, M.; Boland, W.; Parthier, B.; Feussner, I.; Jasmonic acid: biosynthesis, signal transduction, gene expression Fett/Lipid 100, 139-146, (1998) DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1521-4133(19985)100:4/5<139::AID-LIPI139>3.0.CO;2-5

Jasmonic acid (JA) is an ubiquitously occurring plant growth regulator which functions as a signal of developmentally or environmentally regulated expression of various genes thereby contributing to the defense status of plants [1–5]. The formation of jasmonates in a lipid‐based signalling pathway via octadecanoids seems to be a common principle for many plant species to express wound‐ and stressinduced genes [4, 5].There are various octadecanoid‐derived signals [3]. Among them, jasmonic acid and its amino acid conjugates are most active in barley, supporting arguments that β‐oxidation is an essential step in lipid‐based JA mediated responses. Furthermore, among derivatives of 12‐oxophytodienoic acid (PDA) carrying varying length of the carboxylic acid side‐chain, only those with a straight number of carbon atoms are able to induce JA responsive genes in barley leaves after treatment with these compounds. Barley leaves stressed by treatment with sorbitol solutions exhibit mainly an endogenous rise of JA and JA amino acid conjugates suggesting that both of them are stress signals. Data on organ‐ and tissue‐specific JA‐responsive gene expression will be presented and discussed in terms of “JA as a master switch” among various lipid‐derived signals.
Publikation

Wasternack, C.; Ortel, B.; Miersch, O.; Kramell, R.; Beale, M.; Greulich, F.; Feussner, I.; Hause, B.; Krumm, T.; Boland, W.; Parthier, B.; Diversity in octadecanoid-induced gene expression of tomato J. Plant Physiol. 152, 345-352, (1998) DOI: 10.1016/S0176-1617(98)80149-1

In tomato plants wounding leads to up-regulation of various plant defense genes via jasmonates (Ryan, 1992; Bergey et al., 1996). Using this model system of jasmonic acid (JA) signalling, we analyzed activity of octadecanoids to express JA-responsive genes. Leaf treatments were performed with naturally occurring octadecanoids and their molecular mimics such as coronatine or indanone conjugates. JA responses were recorded in terms of up- or down-regulation of various genes by analyzing transcript accumulation, and at least partially in vitro translation products and polypeptide pattern of leaf extracts. The data suggest: (i) 12-Oxo-phytodienoic acid and other intermediates of the octadecanoid pathway has to be ß-oxidized to give a JA response, (ii) Octadecanoids which can not be ß-oxidized are inactive, (iii) JA, its methyl ester (JM), and its amino acid conjugates are most active signals in tomato leaves leading to up regulation of mainly wound-inducible genes and down-regulation of mainly <house-keeping> genes, (iv) Some compounds carrying a JA/JM- or JA amino acid conjugate-like structure induce/repress only a subset of genes suggesting diversity of JA signalling.
Publikation

Vörös, K.; Feussner, I.; Kühn, H.; Lee, J.; Graner, A.; Löbler, M.; Parthier, B.; Wasternack, C.; Characterization of a methyljasmonate-inducible lipoxygenase from barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Salome) leaves Eur. J. Biochem. 251, 36-44, (1998) DOI: 10.1046/j.1432-1327.1998.2510036.x

We found three methyl jasmonate−induced lipoxygenases with molecular masses of 92 kDa, 98 kDa, and 100 kDa (LOX‐92, ‐98 and ‐100) [Feussner, I., Hause, B., Vörös, K., Parthier, B. & Wasternack, C. (1995) Plant J. 7 , 949−957]. At least two of them (LOX‐92 and LOX‐100), were shown to be localized within chloroplasts of barley leaves. Here, we describe the isolation of a cDNA (3073 bp) coding for LOX‐100, a protein of 936 amino acid residues and a molecular mass of 106 kDa. By sequence comparison this lipoxygenase could be identified as LOX2‐type lipoxygenase and was therefore designated LOX2 : Hv : 1 . The recombinant lipoxygenase was expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized as linoleate 13‐LOX and arachidonate 15‐LOX, respectively. The enzyme exhibited a pH optimum around pH 7.0 and a moderate substrate preference for linoleic acid. The gene was transiently expressed after exogenous application of jasmonic acid methyl ester with a maximum between 12 h and 18 h. Its expression was not affected by exogenous application of abscisic acid. Also a rise of endogenous jasmonic acid resulting from sorbitol stress did not induce LOX2 : Hv : 1 , suggesting a separate signalling pathway compared with other jasmonate‐induced proteins of barley. The properties of LOX2 : Hv : 1 are discussed in relation to its possible involvement in jasmonic acid biosynthesis and other LOX forms of barley identified so far.
Publikation

Ratajczak, R.; Feussner, I.; Hause, B.; Böhm, A.; Parthier, B.; Wasternack, C.; Alteration of V-type H+-ATPase during methyljasmonate-induced senescence in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Salome) J. Plant Physiol. 152, 199-206, (1998) DOI: 10.1016/S0176-1617(98)80133-8

In barley leaves, the application of (−)-jasmonic acid or its methyl ester (JAME) induces a senescencelike phenotype. This is accompanied by the synthesis of abundant proteins, so-called jasmonate-induced proteins (JlPs). Here, we show that modifications of vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) subunits are jasmo-nate inducible. Using immunofluorescence analysis, we demonstrate that V-ATPase of barley leaves is exclusively located at the tonoplast also upon JAME treatment. Total ATP-hydrolysis activity of microsomal fractions increased by a factor of 10 during 72 h of JAME-treatment, while Bafilomycin Ai-sensitive ATP-hydrolysis activity, which is usually referred to V-ATPase activity, increased by a factor of about 2 in tono-plast-enriched membrane fractions. Moreover, due to JAME treatment there was a pronounced increase in ATP-hydrolysis activity at pH 6.2. This activity was not affected by inhibitors of P-, F-, or V-ATPases. However, biochemical analysis of partially purified V-ATPase suggests, that this activity might be due at least in part to the V-ATPase. JAME-treatment seems to change biochemical properties of the V-ATPase, i.e. a shift of the pH optimum of activity to a more acidic pH and a decrease in Bafilomycin A1 sensitivity. This is accompanied by the appearance of several additional forms of V-ATPase subunits which might represent either different isoforms or post-translationally modified proteins. We suggest that these changes in properties of the V-ATPase, which is involved in house-keeping and stress responses, may be due to JAME-induced senescence to overcome concomitant changes of the vacuolar membrane.
Publikation

Churin, J.; Hause, B.; Feussner, I.; Maucher, H. P.; Feussner, K.; Börner, T.; Wasternack, C.; Cloning and expression of a new cDNA from monocotyledonous plants coding for a diadenosine 5′,5′′′-P1,P4-tetraphosphate hydrolase from barley (Hordeum vulgare) FEBS Lett. 431, 481-485, (1998) DOI: 10.1016/S0014-5793(98)00819-9

From a cDNA library generated from mRNA of white leaf tissues of the ribosome‐deficient mutant ‘albostrians' of barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Haisa) a cDNA was isolated carrying 54.2% identity to a recently published cDNA which codes for the diadenosine‐5′,5′′′‐P1,P4‐tetraphosphate (Ap4A) hydrolase of Lupinus angustifolius (Maksel et al. (1998) Biochem. J. 329, 313–319), and 69% identity to four partial peptide sequences of Ap4A hydrolase of tomato. Overexpression in Escherichia coli revealed a protein of about 19 kDa, which exhibited Ap4A hydrolase activity and cross‐reactivity with an antibody raised against a purified tomato Ap4A hydrolase (Feussner et al. (1996) Z. Naturforsch. 51c, 477–486). Expression studies showed an mRNA accumulation in all organs of a barley seedling. Possible functions of Ap4A hydrolase in plants will be discussed.
Publikation

Binarová, P.; Hause, B.; Doležel, J.; Dráber, P.; Association of γ-tubulin with kinetochore/centromeric region of plant chromosomes Plant J. 14, 751-757, (1998) DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-313x.1998.00166.x

Monoclonal antibodies raised against a phylogenetically conserved peptide from the C‐terminal domain of γ‐tubulin molecule were used for immunofluorescence detection of γ‐tubulin in acentriolar mitotic spindles of plant cells. The antibodies stained kinetochore fibres along their whole length, including the close vicinity of kinetochores. After microtubule disassembly by the antimicrotubular drugs amiprophos‐methyl, oryzalin and colchicine, γ‐tubulin was found on remnants of kinetochore fibres attached to chromosomes. In cells recovering from the amiprophos‐methyl treatment, γ‐tubulin was localized with the re‐growing kinetochore microtubule fibres nucleated or captured by kinetochore/centromeric regions. On isolated chromosomes, γ‐tubulin co‐localized with α‐tubulin in the kinetochore/centromeric region. The data presented suggest that in acentriolar higher plant cells γ‐tubulin might be directly or indirectly involved in modulation and/or stabilization of kinetochore–microtubule interactions.
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