zur Suche springenzur Navigation springenzum Inhalt springen

Publikationen - Molekulare Signalverarbeitung

Sortieren nach: sort ascending Erscheinungsjahr Typ der Publikation

Zeige Ergebnisse 1 bis 10 von 27.

Bücher und Buchkapitel

Feussner, I.; Blée, E.; Weichert, H.; Rousset, C.; Wasternack, C. Fatty acid catabolism at the lipid body membrane of germinating cucumber cotyledons (Sánchez, J., Cerdá-Olmedo, E., Martínez-Force, E.). Secretariado de Publicaciones de la Universidad de Sevilla 311-313, (1998)

0
Publikation

Weichert, H.; Kohlmann, M.; Wasternack, C.; Feussner, I. Lipids and signalling: oxylipins 3 - functional aspects Biochem. Soc. Trans. 28, 861-862, (2001)

0
Publikation

Berger, S.; Weichert, H.; Porzel, A.; Wasternack, C.; Kühn, H.; Feussner, I. Enzymatic and non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation in leaf development Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1533, 266-276, (2001)

0
Publikation

Weichert, H.; Kolbe, A.; Wasternack, C.; Feussner, I. Formation of 4-hydroxy-1-alkenals in barley leaves Biochem. Soc. Trans. 28, 850-851, (2001)

0
Publikation

Weichert, H.; Kolbe, A.; Kraus, A.; Wasternack, C.; Feussner, I. Metabolic profiling of oxylipins in germinating cucumber seedlings - lipoxygenase-dependent degradation of triacylglycerols and biosynthesis of volatile aldehydes Planta 215, 612-619, (2002)

0
Publikation

Schwechheimer, C.; Calderón Villalobos, L.I. Cullin-containing E3 ubiquitin ligases in plant development Curr. Opin. Plant Biol. 7(6), 677-686, (2002)

In eukaryotes, the ubiquitinproteasome system participates in the control of signal transduction events by selectively eliminating regulatory proteins. E3 ubiquitin ligases specifically bind degradation substrates and mediate their poly-ubiquitylation, a prerequisite for their degradation by the 26S proteasome. On the basis of the analysis of the Arabidopsis genome sequence, it is predicted that there are more than 1000 E3 ubiquitin ligases in plants. Several types of E3 ubiquitin ligases have already been characterized in eukaryotes. Recently, some of these E3 enzymes have been implicated in specific plant signaling pathways.
Bücher und Buchkapitel

Stumpe, M.; Stenzel, I.; Weichert, H.; Hause, B.; Feussner, I. The lipoxygenase pathway in mycorrhizal roots of <span>Medicago truncatula</span> (Murata, N., Yamada, M., Nishida, I., Okuyama, H., Sekijar, J., Hajme, W.). Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht 287-290, (2003)

0
Bücher und Buchkapitel

Weichert, H.; Maucher, H.; Hornung, E.; Wasternack, C.; Feussner, I. Shift in fatty acid and oxylipin pattern of tomato leaves following overexpression of the allene oxide cyclase (Murata, N., Yamada, M., Nishida, I., Okuyama, H., Sekijar, J., Hajme, W.). Kluwer Academic Publishers 275-278, (2003)

0
Publikation

Calderón Villalobos, L.I.; Kuhnle, C.; Dohmann, E.M.; Li, H.; Bevan, M.; Schwechheimer, C. The evolutionarily conserved TOUGH protein is required for proper development of Arabidopsis thaliana Plant Cell 17,9, 24873-2485, (2005)

In this study, we characterize the evolutionarily conserved TOUGH (TGH) protein as a novel regulator required for Arabidopsis thaliana development. We initially identified TGH as a yeast two-hybrid system interactor of the transcription initiation factor TATA-box binding protein 2. TGH has apparent orthologs in all eukaryotic model organisms with the exception of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. TGH contains domains with strong similarity to G-patch and SWAP domains, protein domains that are characteristic of RNA binding and processing proteins. Furthermore, TGH colocalizes with the splicing regulator SRp34 to subnuclear particles. We therefore propose that TGH plays a role in RNA binding or processing. Arabidopsis tgh mutants display developmental defects, including reduced plant height, polycotyly, and reduced vascularization. We found TGH expression to be increased in the amp1-1 mutant, which is similar to tgh mutants with respect to polycotyly and defects in vascular development. Interestingly, we observed a strong genetic interaction between TGH and AMP1 in that tgh-1 amp1-1 double mutants are extremely dwarfed and severely affected in plant development in general and vascular development in particular when compared with the single mutants.
Publikation

De Nardi, B.; Dreos, R.; Del Terra, L.; Martellossi, C.; Asquini, E.; Tornincasa, P.; Gasperini, D.; Pacchioni, B.; Rathinavelu, R.; Pallavicini, A.; Graziosi, G. Differential responses of Coffea arabica L. leaves and roots to chemically induced systemic acquired resistance Genome 49, 1594-1605, (2006) DOI: 10.1139/g06-125

Coffea arabica is susceptible to several pests and diseases, some of which affect the leaves and roots. Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is the main defence mechanism activated in plants in response to pathogen attack. Here, we report the effects of benzo(1,2,3)thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid-s-methyl ester (BTH), a SAR chemical inducer, on the expression profile of C. arabica. Two cDNA libraries were constructed from the mRNA isolated from leaves and embryonic roots to create 1587 nonredundant expressed sequence tags (ESTs). We developed a cDNA microarray containing 1506 ESTs from the leaves and embryonic roots, and 48 NBS-LRR (nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat) gene fragments derived from 2 specific genomic libraries. Competitive hybridization between untreated and BTH-treated leaves resulted in 55 genes that were significantly overexpressed and 16 genes that were significantly underexpressed. In the roots, 37 and 42 genes were over and underexpressed, respectively. A general shift in metabolism from housekeeping to defence occurred in the leaves and roots after BTH treatment. We observed a systemic increase in pathogenesis-related protein synthesis, in the oxidative burst, and in the cell wall strengthening processes. Moreover, responses in the roots and leaves varied significantly.
IPB Mainnav Search