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Publikationen - Molekulare Signalverarbeitung

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Publikation

Mielke, S.; Gasperini, D. Interplay between Plant Cell Walls and Jasmonate Production Plant Cell Physiol 60, 2629-2637, (2019) DOI: 10.1093/pcp/pcz119

Plant cell walls are sophisticated carbohydrate-rich structures representing the immediate contact surface with the extracellular environment, often serving as the first barrier against biotic and abiotic stresses. Notably, a variety of perturbations in plant cell walls result in upregulated jasmonate (JA) production, a phytohormone with essential roles in defense and growth responses. Hence, cell wall-derived signals can initiate intracellular JA-mediated responses and the elucidation of the underlying signaling pathways could provide novel insights into cell wall maintenance and remodeling, as well as advance our understanding on how is JA biosynthesis initiated. This Mini Review will describe current knowledge about cell wall-derived damage signals and their effects on JA biosynthesis, as well as provide future perspectives.
Publikation

Farmer, E. E.; Gasperini, D.; Acosta, I. F. The squeeze cell hypothesis for the activation of jasmonate synthesis in response to wounding New Phytol 204, 282-288, (2014) DOI: 10.1111/nph.12897

Jasmonates are lipid mediators that control defence gene expression in response to wounding and other environmental stresses. These small molecules can accumulate at distances up to several cm from sites of damage and this is likely to involve cell‐to‐cell jasmonate transport. Also, and independently of jasmonate synthesis, transport and perception, different long‐distance wound signals that stimulate distal jasmonate synthesis are propagated at apparent speeds of several cm min–1 to tissues distal to wounds in a mechanism that involves clade 3 GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR‐LIKE (GLR) genes. A search for jasmonate synthesis enzymes that might decode these signals revealed LOX6, a lipoxygenase that is necessary for much of the rapid accumulation of jasmonic acid at sites distal to wounds. Intriguingly, the LOX6 promoter is expressed in a distinct niche of cells that are adjacent to mature xylem vessels, a location that would make these contact cells sensitive to the release of xylem water column tension upon wounding. We propose a model in which rapid axial changes in xylem hydrostatic pressure caused by wounding travel through the vasculature and lead to slower, radially dispersed pressure changes that act in a clade 3 GLR‐dependent mechanism to promote distal jasmonate synthesis.
Publikation

Asquini, E.; Gerdol, M.; Gasperini, D.; Igic, B.; Graziosi, G.; Pallavicini, A. S-RNase-like Sequences in Styles of Coffea (Rubiaceae). Evidence for S-RNase Based Gametophytic Self-Incompatibility? Trop Plant Biol 4, 237-249, (2011) DOI: 10.1007/s12042-011-9085-2

Although RNase-based self-incompatibility (SI) is suspected to operate in a wide group of plant families, it has been characterized as the molecular genetic basis of SI in only three distantly related families, Solanaceae, Plantaginaceae, and Rosaceae, all described over a decade ago. Previous studies found that gametophytic SI, controlled by a multi-allelic S-locus, operates in the coffee family (Rubiaceae). The molecular genetic basis of this mechanism remains unknown, despite the immense importance of coffee as an agricultural commodity. Here, we isolated ten sequences with features of T2-S-type RNases from two Coffea species. While three of the sequences were identified in both species and clearly do not appear to be S-locus products, our data suggest that six sequences may be S-alleles in the self-incompatible C. canephora, and one may be a relict in the self-compatible C. arabica. We demonstrate that these sequences show style-specific expression, display polymorphism in C. canephora, and cluster with S-locus products in a phylogenetic analysis that includes other plant families with RNase-based SI. Although our results are not definitive, in part because the available plant materials were limited and data patterns relatively complex, our results strongly hint that RNase-based SI mechanism operates in the Rubiaceae family.
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