zur Suche springenzur Navigation springenzum Inhalt springen

Publikationen - Molekulare Signalverarbeitung

Sortieren nach: Erscheinungsjahr Typ der Publikation

Zeige Ergebnisse 1 bis 2 von 2.

Publikation

Wasternack, C. & Hause, B. Jasmonates: biosynthesis, perception, signal transduction and action in plant stress response, growth and development. An update to the 2007 review in Annals of Botany Annals of Botany 111, 1021-1058, (2013) DOI: 10.1093/aob/mct067

Background: Jasmonates are important regulators in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses as well as in

development. Synthesized from lipid-constituents, the initially formed jasmonic acid is converted to different

metabolites including the conjugate with isoleucine. Important new components of jasmonate signalling including

its receptor were identified, providing deeper insight into the role of jasmonate signalling pathways in stress

responses and development.

Scope: The present review is an update of the review on jasmonates published in this journal in 2007. New data

of the last five years are described with emphasis on metabolites of jasmonates, on jasmonate perception and

signalling, on cross-talk to other plant hormones and on jasmonate signalling in response to herbivores and pathogens,

in symbiotic interactions, in flower development, in root growth and in light perception.

Conclusions: The last few years have seen breakthroughs in the identification of JASMONATE ZIM DOMAIN

(JAZ) proteins and their interactors such as transcription factors and co-repressors, and the crystallization of the

jasmonate receptor as well as of the enzyme conjugating jasmonate to amino acids. Now, the complex nature of

networks of jasmonate signalling in stress responses and development including hormone cross-talk can beaddressed.

Publikation

Costa, C.T., Strieder, M.L., Abel, S. & Delatorre, C.A. Phosphorus and nitrogen interaction: loss of QC identity in response to P or N limitation is anticipated in the pdr23 mutant Braz J Plant Physiol 23(3), 219-229, (2011)

Changes in root architecture are an important adaptive strategy used by plants in response to limited nutrient availability to increase the odds of acquiring them. The quiescent center (QC) plays an important role by altering the meristem activity causing differentiation and therefore, inducing a determinate growth program. The arabidopsis mutant pdr23 presents primary short root in the presence of nitrate and is inefficient in the use of nucleic acids as a source of phosphorus. In this study the effect of the pdr23 mutation on the QC maintenance under low phosphorus (P) and/or nitrogen is evaluated. QC identity is maintained in wild-type in the absence of nitrate and/or phosphate if nucleic acids can be used as an alternative source of these nutrients, but not in pdr23. The mutant is not able to use nucleic acids efficiently for substitute Pi, determinate growth is observed, similar to wild-type in the total absence of P. In the absence of N pdr23 loses the expression of QC identity marker earlier than wild-type, indicating that not only the response to P is altered, but also to N. The data suggest that the mutation affects a gene involved either in the crosstalk between these nutrients or in a pathway shared by both nutrients limitation response. Moreover loss of QC identity is also observed in wild-type in the absence of N at longer limitation. Less drastic symptoms are observed in lateral roots of both genotypes.
IPB Mainnav Search