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Publications - Stress and Develop Biology

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Publications

Sopeña‐Torres, S., Jordá, L., Sánchez‐Rodríguez, C., Miedes, E., Escudero, V., Swami, S., López, G., Piślewska‐Bednarek, M., Lassowskat, I., Lee, J., Gu, Y., Haigis, S., Alexander, D., Pattathil, S., Muñoz‐Barrios, A., Bednarek, P., Somerville, S., Schulze‐Lefert, P., Hahn, M. G., Scheel, D. & Molina, A. YODA MAP3K kinase regulates plant immune responses conferring broad‐spectrum disease resistance New Phytol 218, 661-680, (2018) DOI: 10.1111/nph.15007

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Publications

Schober, D., Jacob, D., Wilson, M., Cruz, J. A., Marcu, A., Grant, J. R., Moing, A., Deborde, C., de Figueiredo, L. F., Haug, K., Rocca-Serra, P., Easton, J., Ebbels, T. M. D., Hao, J., Ludwig, C., Günther, U. L., Rosato, A., Klein, M. S., Lewis, I. A., Luchinat, C., Jones, A. R., Grauslys, A., Larralde, M., Yokochi, M., Kobayashi, N., Porzel, A., Griffin, J. L., Viant, M. R., Wishart, D. S., Steinbeck, C., Salek, R. M. & Neumann, S. nmrML: A community supported open data standard for the description, storage, and exchange of NMR data. Anal Chem 90, 649–656, (2018) DOI: 10.1021/acs.analchem.7b02795

NMR is a widely used analytical technique with a growing number of repositories available. As a result, demands for a vendor-agnostic, open data format for long-term archiving of NMR data have emerged with the aim to ease and encourage sharing, comparison, and reuse of NMR data. Here we present nmrML, an open XML-based exchange and storage format for NMR spectral data. The nmrML format is intended to be fully compatible with existing NMR data for chemical, biochemical, and metabolomics experiments. nmrML can capture raw NMR data, spectral data acquisition parameters, and where available spectral metadata, such as chemical structures associated with spectral assignments. The nmrML format is compatible with pure-compound NMR data for reference spectral libraries as well as NMR data from complex biomixtures, i.e., metabolomics experiments. To facilitate format conversions, we provide nmrML converters for Bruker, JEOL and Agilent/Varian vendor formats. In addition, easy-to-use Web-based spectral viewing, processing, and spectral assignment tools that read and write nmrML have been developed. Software libraries and Web services for data validation are available for tool developers and end-users. The nmrML format has already been adopted for capturing and disseminating NMR data for small molecules by several open source data processing tools and metabolomics reference spectral libraries, e.g., serving as storage format for the MetaboLights data repository. The nmrML open access data standard has been endorsed by the Metabolomics Standards Initiative (MSI), and we here encourage user participation and feedback to increase usability and make it a successful standard.
Publications

Döll, S., Kuhlmann, M., Rutten, T., Mette, M. F., Scharfenberg, S., Petridis, A., Berreth, D.-C. & Mock, H.-P. Accumulation of the coumarin scopolin under abiotic stress conditions is mediated by the Arabidopsis thaliana THO/TREX complex. Plant J 93, 431-444, (2018) DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13797

Secondary metabolites are involved in the plant stress response. Among these are scopolin and its active form scopoletin, which are coumarin derivatives associated with reactive oxygen species scavenging and pathogen defence. Here we show that scopolin accumulation can be induced in the root by osmotic stress and in the leaf by low-temperature stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. A genetic screen for altered scopolin levels in A. thaliana revealed a mutant compromised in scopolin accumulation in response to stress; the lesion was present in a homologue of THO1 coding for a subunit of the THO/TREX complex. The THO/TREX complex contributes to RNA silencing, supposedly by trafficking precursors of small RNAs. Mutants defective in THO, AGO1, SDS3 and RDR6 were impaired with respect to scopolin accumulation in response to stress, suggesting a mechanism based on RNA silencing such as the trans-acting small interfering RNA pathway, which requires THO/TREX function.
Publications

Furlan, G., Nakagami, H., Eschen-Lippold, L., Jiang, X., Majovsky, P., Kowarschik, K., Hoehenwarter, W., Lee, J. & Trujillo, M. Changes in PUB22 ubiquitination modes triggered by MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE3 dampen the immune response Plant Cell 29, 726-745, (2017) DOI: 10.1105/tpc.16.00654

Crosstalk between post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination and phosphorylation play key roles in controlling the duration and intensity of signalling events to ensure cellular homeostasis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of negative feedback loops remain poorly understood. Here we uncover a pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana by which a negative feedback loop involving the E3 ubiquitin ligase PUB22 that dampens the immune response is triggered by MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE3 (MPK3), best known for its function in the activation of signalling. PUB22's stability is controlled by MPK3-mediated phosphorylation of residues localized in and adjacent to the E2 docking domain. We show that phosphorylation is critical for stabilization by inhibiting PUB22 oligomerization and thus autoubiquitination. The activity switch allows PUB22 to dampen the immune response. This regulatory mechanism also suggests that autoubiquitination, which is inherent to most single unit E3s in vitro, can function as a self-regulatory mechanism in vivo. 
Publications

Ziegler, J., Schmidt, S., Strehmel, N., Scheel, D. & Abel, S. Arabidopsis transporter ABCG37/PDR9 contributes primarily highly oxygenated coumarins to root exudation.  Scientific Rep 7, 3704, (2017) DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-03250-6

The chemical composition of root exudates strongly impacts the interactions of plants with microorganisms in the rhizosphere and the efficiency of nutrient acquisition. Exudation of metabolites is in part mediated by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. In order to assess the contribution of individual ABC transporters to root exudation, we performed an LC-MS based non-targeted metabolite profiling of semi-polar metabolites accumulating in root exudates of Arabidopsis thaliana plants and mutants deficient in the expression of ABCG36 (PDR8/PEN3), ABCG37 (PDR9) or both transporters. Comparison of the metabolite profiles indicated distinct roles for each ABC transporter in root exudation. Thymidine exudation could be attributed to ABCG36 function, whereas coumarin exudation was strongly reduced only in ABCG37 deficient plants. However, coumarin exudation was compromised in abcg37 mutants only with respect to certain metabolites of this substance class. The specificity of ABCG37 for individual coumarins was further verified by a targeted LC-MS based coumarin profiling method. The response to iron deficiency, which is known to strongly induce coumarin exudation, was also investigated. In either treatment, the distribution of individual coumarins between roots and exudates in the investigated genotypes suggested the involvement of ABCG37 in the exudation specifically of highly oxygenated rather than monohydroxylated coumarins.
Publications

Meier, R., Ruttkies, C., Treutler, H. & Neumann, S. Bioinformatics can boost metabolomics research.  J. Biotechnol. 261 , 137-141, (2017) DOI: 10.1016/j.jbiotec.2017.05.018

Metabolomics is the modern term for the field of small molecule research in biology and biochemistry. Currently, metabolomics is undergoing a transition where the classic analytical chemistry is combined with modern cheminformatics and bioinformatics methods, paving the way for large-scale data analysis. We give some background on past developments, highlight current state-of-the-art approaches, and give a perspective on future requirements.
Publications

Blüher, D., Laha, D., Thieme, S., Hofer, A., Eschen-Lippold, L., Masch, A., Balcke, G., Pavlovic, I., Nagel, O., Schonsky, A., Hinkelmann, R., Wörner, J., Parvin, N., Greiner, R., Weber, S., Tissier, A., Schutkowski, M., Lee, J., Jessen, H., Schaaf, G. & Bonas, U. A 1-phytase type III effector interferes with plant hormone signaling. Nature Commun. 8(1), 2159, (2017) DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-02195-8

Most Gram-negative phytopathogenic bacteria inject type III effector (T3E) proteins into plant cells to manipulate signaling pathways to the pathogen’s benefit. In resistant plants, specialized immune receptors recognize single T3Es or their biochemical activities, thus halting pathogen ingress. However, molecular function and mode of recognition for most T3Es remains elusive. Here, we show that the Xanthomonas T3E XopH possesses phytase activity, i.e., dephosphorylates phytate (myo-inositol-hexakisphosphate, InsP6), the major phosphate storage compound in plants, which is also involved in pathogen defense. A combination of biochemical approaches, including a new NMR-based method to discriminate inositol polyphosphate enantiomers, identifies XopH as a naturally occurring 1-phytase that dephosphorylates InsP6 at C1. Infection of Nicotiana benthamiana and pepper by Xanthomonas results in a XopH-dependent conversion of InsP6 to InsP5. 1-phytase activity is required for XopH-mediated immunity of plants carrying the Bs7 resistance gene, and for induction of jasmonate- and ethylene-responsive genes in N. benthamiana.
Publications

Hempel, F., Stenzel, I., Heilmann, M., Krishnamoorthy, P., Menzel, W., Golbik, R., Helm, S., Dobritzsch, D., Baginsky, S., Lee, J., Hoehenwarter, W. & Heilmann, I. MAPKs influence pollen tube growth by controlling the formation of Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate in an apical plasma membrane domain.  Plant Cell 29, 3030-3050, (2017) DOI: 10.1105/tpc.17.00543

An apical plasma membrane domain enriched in the regulatory phospholipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] is critical for polar tip growth of pollen tubes. How the biosynthesis of PtdIns(4,5)P2 by phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinases (PI4P 5-kinases) is controlled by upstream signaling is currently unknown. The pollen-expressed PI4P 5-kinase PIP5K6 is required for clathrin-mediated endocytosis and polar tip growth in pollen tubes. Here, we identify PIP5K6 as a target of the pollen-expressed mitogen-activated protein kinase MPK6 and characterize the regulatory effects. Based on an untargeted mass spectrometry approach, phosphorylation of purified recombinant PIP5K6 by pollen tube extracts could be attributed to MPK6. Recombinant MPK6 phosphorylated residues T590 and T597 in the variable insert of the catalytic domain of PIP5K6, and this modification inhibited PIP5K6 activity in vitro. PIP5K6 interacted with MPK6 in yeast two-hybrid tests, immuno-pull-down assays, and by bimolecular fluorescence complementation at the apical plasma membrane of pollen tubes. In vivo, MPK6 expression resulted in reduced plasma membrane association of a fluorescent PtdIns(4,5)P2 reporter and decreased endocytosis without impairing membrane association of PIP5K6. Effects of PIP5K6 expression on pollen tube growth and cell morphology were attenuated by coexpression of MPK6 in a phosphosite-dependent manner. Our data indicate that MPK6 controls PtdIns(4,5)P2 production and membrane trafficking in pollen tubes, possibly contributing to directional growth.
Publications

Herz, K., Dietz, S., Haider, S., Jandt, U., Scheel, D. & Bruelheide, H. Drivers of intraspecific trait variation of grass and forb species in German meadows and pastures J. Vegetation Sci. 28, 705–716, (2017) DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12534

Questions
To what extent is trait variation in grasses and forbs driven by land-use intensity, climate, soil conditions and plant diversity of the local neighbourhood? Do grass and forb species differ in the degree of intraspecific trait variation?

Location
Managed grasslands in three regions of Germany.

Methods
Using a phytometer approach, we raised 20 common European grassland species (ten forbs and ten grasses) and planted them into 54 plots of different land-use types (pasture, meadow, mown pasture). After 1 yr in the field, we measured above- and below-ground plant functional traits. Linear mixed effects models (LMEM) were used to identify the most powerful predictors for every trait. Variation partitioning was applied to assess the amount of inter- and intraspecific trait variation in grasses and forbs explained by environmental conditions (land-use intensity, climate and soil conditions) and plant species diversity of the local neighbourhood.

Results
For 12 out of the 14 traits studied, either land-use intensity or local neighbourhood diversity were predictors in the best LMEM. Land-use intensity had considerably stronger effects than neighbourhood diversity. Root dry matter content and root phosphorus concentration of forbs were more affected by land-use intensity than those of grasses. For almost all traits, intraspecific trait variation of grasses was much higher than that of forbs, while traits of forbs varied more among species. Overall, inter- and intraspecific variation was of the same magnitude.

Conclusion
The similar magnitude of intra- and interspecific trait variation suggests that both sources should be considered in grassland studies at a scale similar to that of our study. The high amount of intraspecific trait variation that was explained by environmental factors and local neighbourhood diversity clearly demonstrates the high potential of species to adjust to local conditions, which would be ignored when only considering species mean trait values.

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Publications

Al Shweiki, M. H. D. R., Mönchgesang, S., Majovsky, P., Thieme, D., Trutschel, D. & Hoehenwarter, W. Assessment of Label-Free quantification in discovery proteomics and impact of technological factors and natural variability of protein abundance. J Proteome Res. 16 , 1410–1424, (2017) DOI: 10.1021/acs.jproteome.6b00645

We evaluated the state of label-free discovery proteomics focusing especially on technological contributions and contributions of naturally occurring differences in protein abundance to the intersample variability in protein abundance estimates in this highly peptide-centric technology. First, the performance of popular quantitative proteomics software, Proteome Discoverer, Scaffold, MaxQuant, and Progenesis QIP, was benchmarked using their default parameters and some modified settings. Beyond this, the intersample variability in protein abundance estimates was decomposed into variability introduced by the entire technology itself and variable protein amounts inherent to individual plants of the Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 accession. The technical component was considerably higher than the biological intersample variability, suggesting an effect on the degree and validity of reported biological changes in protein abundance. Surprisingly, the biological variability, protein abundance estimates, and protein fold changes were recorded differently by the software used to quantify the proteins, warranting caution in the comparison of discovery proteomics results. As expected, ∼99% of the proteome was invariant in the isogenic plants in the absence of environmental factors; however, few proteins showed substantial quantitative variability. This naturally occurring variation between individual organisms can have an impact on the causality of reported protein fold changes.

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