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Publications - Molecular Signal Processing

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Displaying results 1 to 10 of 18.

Publications

Flores, R.; Delgado, S.; Gas, M.E.; Carbonell, A.; Molina, D.; Gago, S.; de la Peña, M. Viroids: the minimal non-coding RNA's with autonomous replication FEBS Letters 567, 42-48, (2004) DOI: 10.1016/j.febslet.2004.03.118

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Publications

Carbonell, A.; de la Peña, M.; Flores, R.; Gago, S. Effects of the trinucleotide preceding the self-cleavage site on eggplant latent viroid hammerheads: difference in co- and post-transcriptional self-cleavage may explain the lack trinucleotide AUC in most natural hammerheads Nucleic Acids Research 34, 5613-5622, (2006) DOI: 10.1093/nar/gkl717

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Books and chapters

Flores, R.; Carbonell, A.; de la Peña, M.; Gago, S. RNAs autocatalíticos: ribozimas de cabeza de martillo (Fenoll, C., Marcos, J., Pallás, V., Rodriguez Palenzuela, P.). Spanish Society of Phytopathology 407-420, (2007) ISBN: 84-6476-319-6

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Books and chapters

Flores, R.; Carbonell, A.; Gago, S.; Martínez de Alba, A.E.; Delgado, S.; Rodio, M.E.; di Serio, F. Viroid-host interactions: A molecular dialogue between two uneven partners (Lorito, M., Woo, S. L., Scala, F.). 6 (chap. 58), 1-9, (2008)

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Publications

Carbonell, A.; Martínez de Alba, A.E.; Flores, R.; Gago, S. Double-stranded RNA interferes in a sequence-specific manner with the infection of representative members of the two viroid families Virology 371, 44-53, (2008) DOI: 10.1016/j.virol.2007.09.031

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Publications

Flores, R.; Gas, M.E.; Molina-Serrano, D.; Nohales, M.A.; Carbonell, A.; Gago, S.; de la Peña, M.; Daròs, J.A. Viroid replication: rolling-circles, enzymes and ribozymes Viruses 1, 317-334, (2009) DOI: 10.3390/v1020317

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Publications

Carbonell, A.; Flores, R.; Gago, S. Trans -cleaving hammerhead ribozymes with tertiary stabilizing motifs: in vitro and in vivo activity against a structured viroid RNA Nucleic Acids Research 39, 2432-2444, (2011) DOI: 10.1093/nar/gkq1051

Trans -cleaving hammerheads with discontinuous or extended stem I and with tertiary stabilizing motifs (TSMs) have been tested previously against short RNA substrates in vitro at low Mg 2+ concentration. However, the potential of these ribozymes for targeting longer and structured RNAs in vitro and in vivo has not been examined. Here, we report the in vitro cleavage of short RNAs and of a 464-nt highly structured RNA from potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) by hammerheads with discontinuous and extended formats at submillimolar Mg 2+ . Under these conditions, hammerheads derived from eggplant latent viroid and peach latent mosaic viroid (PLMVd) with discontinuous and extended formats, respectively, where the most active. Furthermore, a PLMVd-derived hammerhead with natural TSMs showed activity in vivo against the same long substrate and interfered with systemic PSTVd infection, thus reinforcing the idea that this class of ribozymes has potential to control pathogenic RNA replicons.
Books and chapters

Carbonell, A.; Flores, R.; Gago, S. Hammerhead Ribozymes Against Virus and Viroid RNAs (Erdmann, V. A. & Barciszewski, J., eds.). RNA Technologies 411-427, (2012) ISBN: 978-3-642-27426-8 DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-27426-8_16

The hammerhead ribozyme, a small catalytic motif that promotes self-cleavage of the RNAs in which it is found naturally embedded, can be manipulated to recognize and cleave specifically in trans other RNAs in the presence of Mg2+. To be really effective, hammerheads need to operate at the low concentration of Mg2+ existing in vivo. Evidence has been gathered along the last years showing that tertiary stabilizing motifs (TSMs), particularly interactions between peripheral loops, are critical for the catalytic activity of hammerheads at physiological levels of Mg2+. These TSMs, in two alternative formats, have been incorporated into a new generation of more efficient trans-cleaving hammerheads, some of which are active in vitro and in planta when targeted against the highly structured RNA of a viroid (a small plant pathogen). This strategy has potential to confer protection against other RNA replicons, like RNA viruses infecting plants and animals.
Publications

Antolín-Llovera, M.; Ried, M. K.; Binder, A.; Parniske, M. Receptor Kinase Signaling Pathways in Plant-Microbe Interactions Annu Rev Phytopathol 50, 451-473, (2012) DOI: 10.1146/annurev-phyto-081211-173002

Plant receptor-like kinases (RLKs) function in diverse signaling pathways, including the responses to microbial signals in symbiosis and defense. This versatility is achieved with a common overall structure: an extracytoplasmic domain (ectodomain) and an intracellular protein kinase domain involved in downstream signal transduction. Various surfaces of the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) ectodomain superstructure are utilized for interaction with the cognate ligand in both plant and animal receptors. RLKs with lysin-motif (LysM) ectodomains confer recognitional specificity toward N-acetylglucosamine-containing signaling molecules, such as chitin, peptidoglycan (PGN), and rhizobial nodulation factor (NF), that induce immune or symbiotic responses. Signaling downstream of RLKs does not follow a single pattern; instead, the detailed analysis of brassinosteroid (BR) signaling, innate immunity, and symbiosis revealed at least three largely nonoverlapping pathways. In this review, we focus on RLKs involved in plant-microbe interactions and contrast the signaling pathways leading to symbiosis and defense.
Publications

Den Herder, G.; Yoshida, S.; Antolín-Llovera, M.; Ried, M. K.; Parniske, M. Lotus japonicus E3 Ligase SEVEN IN ABSENTIA4 Destabilizes the Symbiosis Receptor-Like Kinase SYMRK and Negatively Regulates Rhizobial Infection Plant Cell 24, 1691-1707, (2012) DOI: 10.1105/tpc.110.082248

The Lotus japonicus SYMBIOSIS RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE (SYMRK) is required for symbiotic signal transduction upon stimulation of root cells by microbial signaling molecules. Here, we identified members of the SEVEN IN ABSENTIA (SINA) E3 ubiquitin-ligase family as SYMRK interactors and confirmed their predicted ubiquitin-ligase activity. In Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, SYMRK–yellow fluorescent protein was localized at the plasma membrane, and interaction with SINAs, as determined by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, was observed in small punctae at the cytosolic interface of the plasma membrane. Moreover, fluorescence-tagged SINA4 partially colocalized with SYMRK and caused SYMRK relocalization as well as disappearance of SYMRK from the plasma membrane. Neither the localization nor the abundance of Nod-factor receptor1 was altered by the presence of SINA4. SINA4 was transcriptionally upregulated during root symbiosis, and rhizobia inoculated roots ectopically expressing SINA4 showed reduced SYMRK protein levels. In accordance with a negative regulatory role in symbiosis, infection thread development was impaired upon ectopic expression of SINA4. Our results implicate SINA4 E3 ubiquitin ligase in the turnover of SYMRK and provide a conceptual mechanism for its symbiosis-appropriate spatio-temporal containment.
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