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Publications - Molecular Signal Processing

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Displaying results 1 to 10 of 19.

Publications

Feussner, I.; Kühn, H.; Wasternack, C. The lipoxygenase dependent degradation of storage lipids Trends Plant Sci. 6, 268-273, (2001)

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Weichert, H.; Kohlmann, M.; Wasternack, C.; Feussner, I. Lipids and signalling: oxylipins 3 - functional aspects Biochem. Soc. Trans. 28, 861-862, (2001)

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Li, G.; Goyal, G.S.; Abel, S.; Quiros, C.F. Inheritance of three major genes involved in the synthesis of aliphatic glucosinolates in <em>Brassica oleracea</em> J Amer Soc Hort Sci 126, 427 - 431, (2001)

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Abel, S.; Köck, M. Secretory ribonucleases from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Mill.) Meth Enzymol 341, 351 - 368, (2001)

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Publications

Hilpert, B.; Bohlmann, H.; Den Camp, R.O.; Przybyla, D.; Miersch, O.; Buchala, A.; Apel, K. Isolation and characterization of signal transduction mutants of <EM>Arabidopsis thaliana</EM> that constitutively activate the octadecanoid pathway and form necrotic microlesions Plant J. 26, 435-446, (2001)

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Weichert, H.; Kolbe, A.; Wasternack, C.; Feussner, I. Formation of 4-hydroxy-1-alkenals in barley leaves Biochem. Soc. Trans. 28, 850-851, (2001)

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Publications

Berger, S.; Weichert, H.; Porzel, A.; Wasternack, C.; Kühn, H.; Feussner, I. Enzymatic and non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation in leaf development Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1533, 266-276, (2001)

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Ticconi, C.A.; Delatorre, C.A.; Abel, S. Attenuation of phosphate starvation responses by phosphate in <span style="font-style: italic;">Arabidopsis thaliana</span> Plant Physiol 127, 963 - 972, (2001)

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Publications

Wasternack, C.; Hause, B. Jasmonates: biosynthesis, perception, signal transduction and action in plant stress response, growth and development. An update to the 2007 review in <span>Annals of Botany</span> Annals of Botany 111, 1021-1058, (2013) DOI: 10.1093/aob/mct067

Background: Jasmonates are important regulators in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses as well as indevelopment. Synthesized from lipid-constituents, the initially formed jasmonic acid is converted to differentmetabolites including the conjugate with isoleucine. Important new components of jasmonate signalling includingits receptor were identified, providing deeper insight into the role of jasmonate signalling pathways in stressresponses and development.Scope: The present review is an update of the review on jasmonates published in this journal in 2007. New dataof the last five years are described with emphasis on metabolites of jasmonates, on jasmonate perception andsignalling, on cross-talk to other plant hormones and on jasmonate signalling in response to herbivores and pathogens,in symbiotic interactions, in flower development, in root growth and in light perception.Conclusions: The last few years have seen breakthroughs in the identification of JASMONATE ZIM DOMAIN(JAZ) proteins and their interactors such as transcription factors and co-repressors, and the crystallization of thejasmonate receptor as well as of the enzyme conjugating jasmonate to amino acids. Now, the complex nature ofnetworks of jasmonate signalling in stress responses and development including hormone cross-talk can beaddressed.
Publications

Kopycki, J.; Wieduwild, E.; Kohlschmidt, J.; Brandt, W.; Stepanova, A.N.; Alonso, J.M.; Pedras, M.S.; Abel, S.; Grubb, C.D. Kinetic analysis of Arabidopsis glucosyltransferase UGT74B1 illustrates a general mechanism by which enzymes can escape product inhibition Biochem J 450, 37-46, (2013) DOI: 10.1042/BJ20121403

Plant genomes encode numerous small molecule glycosyltransferases which modulate the solubility, activity, immunogenicity and/or reactivity of hormones, xenobiotics and natural products. The products of these enzymes can accumulate to very high concentrations, yet somehow avoid inhibiting their own biosynthesis. Glucosyltransferase UGT74B1 (UDP-glycosyltransferase 74B1) catalyses the penultimate step in the core biosynthetic pathway of glucosinolates, a group of natural products with important functions in plant defence against pests and pathogens. We found that mutation of the highly conserved Ser284 to leucine [wei9-1 (weak ethylene insensitive)] caused only very mild morphological and metabolic phenotypes, in dramatic contrast with knockout mutants, indicating that steady state glucosinolate levels are actively regulated even in unchallenged plants. Analysis of the effects of the mutation via a structural modelling approach indicated that the affected serine interacts directly with UDP-glucose, but also predicted alterations in acceptor substrate affinity and the kcat value, sparking an interest in the kinetic behaviour of the wild-type enzyme. Initial velocity and inhibition studies revealed that UGT74B1 is not inhibited by its glycoside product. Together with the effects of the missense mutation, these findings are most consistent with a partial rapid equilibrium ordered mechanism. This model explains the lack of product inhibition observed both in vitro and in vivo, illustrating a general mechanism whereby enzymes can continue to function even at very high product/precursor ratios.
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