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Publications - Molecular Signal Processing

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Publications

Kopycki, J.; Wieduwild, E.; Kohlschmidt, J.; Brandt, W.; Stepanova, A.N.; Alonso, J.M.; Pedras, M.S.; Abel, S.; Grubb, C.D. Kinetic analysis of Arabidopsis glucosyltransferase UGT74B1 illustrates a general mechanism by which enzymes can escape product inhibition Biochem J 450, 37-46, (2013) DOI: 10.1042/BJ20121403

Plant genomes encode numerous small molecule glycosyltransferases which modulate the solubility, activity, immunogenicity and/or reactivity of hormones, xenobiotics and natural products. The products of these enzymes can accumulate to very high concentrations, yet somehow avoid inhibiting their own biosynthesis. Glucosyltransferase UGT74B1 (UDP-glycosyltransferase 74B1) catalyses the penultimate step in the core biosynthetic pathway of glucosinolates, a group of natural products with important functions in plant defence against pests and pathogens. We found that mutation of the highly conserved Ser284 to leucine [wei9-1 (weak ethylene insensitive)] caused only very mild morphological and metabolic phenotypes, in dramatic contrast with knockout mutants, indicating that steady state glucosinolate levels are actively regulated even in unchallenged plants. Analysis of the effects of the mutation via a structural modelling approach indicated that the affected serine interacts directly with UDP-glucose, but also predicted alterations in acceptor substrate affinity and the kcat value, sparking an interest in the kinetic behaviour of the wild-type enzyme. Initial velocity and inhibition studies revealed that UGT74B1 is not inhibited by its glycoside product. Together with the effects of the missense mutation, these findings are most consistent with a partial rapid equilibrium ordered mechanism. This model explains the lack of product inhibition observed both in vitro and in vivo, illustrating a general mechanism whereby enzymes can continue to function even at very high product/precursor ratios.
Publications

Huang, H.; Quint, M. & Gray, W.M. The <i>eta7/csn3-3</i> auxin response mutant of Arabidopsis defines a novel function for the CSN3 subunit of the COP9 signalosome  PLoS One 8, e66578, (2013) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0066578

TIR1/AFBTIR1The COP9 signalosome (CSN) is an eight subunit protein complex conserved in all higher eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the CSN regulates auxin response by removing the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8/RUB1 from the CUL1 subunit of the SCF ubiquitin-ligase (deneddylation). Previously described null mutations in any CSN subunit result in the pleiotropic cop/det/fus phenotype and cause seedling lethality, hampering the study of CSN functions in plant development. In a genetic screen to identify enhancers of the auxin response defects conferred by the tir1-1 mutation, we identified a viable csn mutant of subunit 3 (CSN3), designated eta7/csn3-3. In addition to enhancing tir1-1 mutant phenotypes, the csn3-3 mutation alone confers several phenotypes indicative of impaired auxin signaling including auxin resistant root growth and diminished auxin responsive gene expression. Unexpectedly however, csn3-3 plants are not defective in either the CSN-mediated deneddylation of CUL1 or in SCF-mediated degradation of Aux/IAA proteins. These findings suggest that csn3-3 is an atypical csn mutant that defines a novel CSN or CSN3-specific function. Consistent with this possibility, we observe dramatic differences in double mutant interactions between csn3-3 and other auxin signaling mutants compared to another weak csn mutant, csn1-10. Lastly, unlike other csn mutants, assembly of the CSN holocomplex is unaffected in csn3-3 plants. However, we detected a small CSN3-containing protein complex that is altered in csn3-3 plants. We hypothesize that in addition to its role in the CSN as a cullin deneddylase, CSN3 functions in a distinct protein complex that is required for proper auxin signaling.
Publications

Poeschl, Y.; Delker, C.; Trenner, J.; Ullrich, K.; Quint, M. & Grosse, I. Optimized probe masking for comparative transcriptomics of closely related species.<!--[if gte mso 9]><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> Normal 0 21 false false false DE X-NONE X-NONE</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 10]> <style> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Normale Tabelle"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;}</style> <![endif]--> PLOS ONE 8, e78497, (2013) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0078497

Microarrays are commonly applied to study the transcriptome of specific species. However, many available microarrays arerestricted to model organisms, and the design of custom microarrays for other species is often not feasible. Hence,transcriptomics approaches of non-model organisms as well as comparative transcriptomics studies among two or morespecies often make use of cost-intensive RNAseq studies or, alternatively, by hybridizing transcripts of a query species to amicroarray of a closely related species. When analyzing these cross-species microarray expression data, differences in thetranscriptome of the query species can cause problems, such as the following: (i) lower hybridization accuracy of probes dueto mismatches or deletions, (ii) probes binding multiple transcripts of different genes, and (iii) probes binding transcripts ofnon-orthologous genes. So far, methods for (i) exist, but these neglect (ii) and (iii). Here, we propose an approach forcomparative transcriptomics addressing problems (i) to (iii), which retains only transcript-specific probes binding transcriptsof orthologous genes. We apply this approach to an Arabidopsis lyrata expression data set measured on a microarraydesigned for Arabidopsis thaliana, and compare it to two alternative approaches, a sequence-based approach and a genomicDNA hybridization-based approach. We investigate the number of retained probe sets, and we validate the resultingexpression responses by qRT-PCR. We find that the proposed approach combines the benefit of sequence-based stringencyand accuracy while allowing the expression analysis of much more genes than the alternative sequence-based approach. Asan added benefit, the proposed approach requires probes to detect transcripts of orthologous genes only, which provides asuperior base for biological interpretation of the measured expression responses.
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