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Publications - Molecular Signal Processing

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Displaying results 1 to 10 of 33.

Publications

Ziegler, J.; Vogt, T.; Miersch, O.; Strack, D. Concentration of dilute protein solutions prior to sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis Anal. Biochem 250, 257-260, (1997) DOI: 10.1006/abio.1997.2248

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Publications

Gago, S.; Costa, N.; Semorile, L.; Grau, O. Sequence variability in p27 gene of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) revealed by SSCP analysis Electronic Journal of Biotechnology 2, 41-50, (1999)

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Publications

Hause, B.; Maier, W.; Miersch, O.; Kramell, R.; Strack, D. Induction of jasmonate biosynthesis in arbuscular mycorrhizal barley roots Plant Physiol. 130, 1213-1220, (2002) DOI: 10.1104/pp.006007

Colonization of barley (Hordeum vulgare cv Salome) roots by an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, Glomus intraradices Schenck & Smith, leads to elevated levels of endogenous jasmonic acid (JA) and its amino acid conjugate JA-isoleucine, whereas the level of the JA precursor, oxophytodienoic acid, remains constant. The rise in jasmonates is accompanied by the expression of genes coding for an enzyme of JA biosynthesis (allene oxide synthase) and of a jasmonate-induced protein (JIP23). In situ hybridization and immunocytochemical analysis revealed that expression of these genes occurred cell specifically within arbuscule-containing root cortex cells. The concomitant gene expression indicates that jasmonates are generated and act within arbuscule-containing cells. By use of a near-synchronous mycorrhization, analysis of temporal expression patterns showed the occurrence of transcript accumulation 4 to 6 d after the appearance of the first arbuscules. This suggests that the endogenous rise in jasmonates might be related to the fully established symbiosis rather than to the recognition of interacting partners or to the onset of interaction. Because the plant supplies the fungus with carbohydrates, a model is proposed in which the induction of JA biosynthesis in colonized roots is linked to the stronger sink function of mycorrhizal roots compared with nonmycorrhizal roots.
Publications

de la Peña, M.; Gago, S.; Flores, R. Peripheral regions of natural hammerhead ribozymes greatly increase their self-cleavage activity The EMBO Journal 22, 5561-5570, (2003)

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Publications

Flores, R.; Delgado, S.; Gas, M.E.; Carbonell, A.; Molina, D.; Gago, S.; de la Peña, M. Viroids: the minimal non-coding RNA's with autonomous replication FEBS Letters 567, 42-48, (2004)

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Publications

Gago, S.; de la Peña, M.; Flores, R. A kissing-loop interaction in a hammerhead viroid RNA critical for its in vitro folding and in vivo viability RNA 11, 1073-1083, (2005)

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Publications

Isayenkov, S.; Mrosk, C.; Stenzel, I.; Strack, D.; Hause, B. Suppression of allene oxide cyclase in hairy roots of <span>Medicago truncatula</span> reduces jasmonate levels and the degree of mycorrhization with <span>Glomus intraradices</span> Plant Physiol 139, 1401-1410, (2005)

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Publications

Carbonell, A.; de la Peña, M.; Flores, R.; Gago, S. Effects of the trinucleotide preceding the self-cleavage site on eggplant latent viroid hammerheads: difference in co- and post-transcriptional self-cleavage may explain the lack trinucleotide AUC in most natural hammerheads Nucleic Acids Research 34, 5613-5622, (2006) DOI: 10.1093/nar/gkl717

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Books and chapters

Flores, R.; Carbonell, A.; de la Peña, M.; Gago, S. RNAs autocatalíticos: ribozimas de cabeza de martillo (Fenoll, C., Marcos, J., Pallás, V., Rodriguez Palenzuela, P.). Spanish Society of Phytopathology 407-420, (2007) ISBN: 84-6476-319-6

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Publications

Flores, R.; Navarro, B.; Gago, S.; de la Peña, M. Chrysanthemum Chlorotic Mottle Viroid: a System for Reverse Genetics in the Family Avsunviroidae (Hammerhead Viroids) Plant Viruses 1, 27-32, (2007)

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