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Publications - Molecular Signal Processing

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Publications

Wasternack, C. New Light on Local and Systemic Wound Signaling Trends Plant Sci 24, 102-105, (2019) DOI: 10.1016/j.tplants.2018.11.009

Electric signaling and Ca2+ waves were discussed to occur in systemic wound responses. Two new overlapping scenarios were identified: (i) membrane depolarization in two special cell types followed by an increase in systemic cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt), and (ii) glutamate sensed by GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR LIKE proteins and followed by Ca2+-based defense in distal leaves.
Publications

Wasternack, C. Termination in Jasmonate Signaling by MYC2 and MTBs Trends Plant Sci 24, 667-669, (2019) DOI: 10.1016/j.tplants.2019.06.001

Jasmonic acid (JA) signaling can be switched off by metabolism of JA. The master regulator MYC2, interacting with MED25, has been shown to be deactivated by the bHLH transcription factors MTB1, MTB2, and MTB3. An autoregulatory negative feedback loop has been proposed for this termination in JA signaling.
Publications

Wasternack, C.; Hause, B. A Bypass in Jasmonate Biosynthesis – the OPR3-independent Formation Trends Plant Sci 23, 276-279, (2018) DOI: 10.1016/j.tplants.2018.02.011

For the first time in 25 years, a new pathway for biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (JA) has been identified. JA production takes place via 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) including reduction by OPDA reductases (OPRs). A loss-of-function allele, opr3-3, revealed an OPR3-independent pathway converting OPDA to JA.
Publications

Wasternack, C.; Strnad, M. Jasmonate signaling in plant stress responses and development – active and inactive compounds New Biotechnology 33 B, 604-613, (2016) DOI: 10.1016/j.nbt.2015.11.001

Jasmonates (JAs) are lipid-derived signals mediating plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses and in plant development. Following the elucidation of each step in their biosynthesis and the important components of perception and signaling, several activators, repressors and co-repressors have been identified which contribute to fine-tuning the regulation of JA-induced gene expression. Many of the metabolic reactions in which JA participates, such as conjugation with amino acids, glucosylation, hydroxylation, carboxylation, sulfation and methylation, lead to numerous compounds with different biological activities. These metabolites may be highly active, partially active in specific processes or inactive. Hydroxylation, carboxylation and sulfation inactivate JA signaling. The precursor of JA biosynthesis, 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA), has been identified as a JA-independent signaling compound. An increasing number of OPDA-specific processes is being identified. To conclude, the numerous JA compounds and their different modes of action allow plants to respond specifically and flexibly to alterations in the environment.
Publications

Song, S.; Qi, T.; Wasternack, C.; Xie, D. Jasmonate signaling and crosstalk with gibberellin and ethylene Curr Opin Plant Biol. 21 , 112-119, (2014) DOI: 10.1016/j.pbi.2014.07.005

The phytohormone jasmonate (JA) plays essential roles in plant growth, development and defense. In response to the JA signal, the CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1 (COI1)-based SCF complexes recruit JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) repressors for ubiquitination and degradation, and subsequently regulate their downstream signaling components essential for various JA responses. Tremendous progress has been made in understanding the JA signaling pathway and its crosstalk with other phytohormone pathways during the past two decades. Recent studies have revealed that a variety of positive and negative regulators act as targets of JAZs to control distinctive JA responses, and that JAZs and these regulators function as crucial interfaces to mediate synergy and antagonism between JA and other phytohormones. Owing to different regulatory players in JA perception and JA signaling, a fine-tuning of JA-dependent processes in plant growth, development and defense is achieved. In this review, we will summarize the latest progresses in JA signaling and its crosstalk with gibberellin and ethylene.
Publications

Eschen-Lippold, L.; Rothe, G.; Stumpe, M.; Göbel, C.; Feussner, I.; Rosahl, S. Reduction of divinyl ether-containing polyunsaturated fatty acids in transgenic potato plants Phytochemistry 68, 797-801, (2007) DOI: 10.1016/j.phytochem.2006.12.010

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Publications

Sharma, V.K.; Monostori, T.; Göbel, C.; Hänsch, R.; Bittner, F.; Wasternack, C.; Feussner, I.; Mendel, R.R.; Hause, B.; Schulze, J. Transgenic barley plants overexpressing a 13-lipoxygenase to modify oxylipin signature Phytochemistry 67, 264-276 , (2006) DOI: 10.1016/j.phytochem.2005.11.009

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