jump to searchjump to navigationjump to content

Publications - Molecular Signal Processing

Sort by: Year sort ascending Type of publication

Displaying results 1 to 10 of 12.

Publications

Hause, B.; Kogel, K.-H.; Parthier, B.; Wasternack, C. In barley leaf cells, jasmonates do not act as a signal during compatible or incompatible interactions with the powdery mildew fungus (<i>Erysiphe graminis</i> f. sp. <i>hordei</i>) J. Plant Physiol. 150, 127-132, (1997) DOI: 10.1016/S0176-1617(97)80191-5

We have studied a possible function of jasmonates as mediators in the host-pathogen interaction of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) with the powdery mildew fungus Egh (Erysiphe graminis f. sp. hordei). Previous findings from whole-leaf extracts demonstrated that (i) extracts from infected barley leaves did not contain enhanced levels of jasmonates, (ii) transcripts of jasmonate-inducible genes were not expressed upon infection, and (iii) exogenous application of jasmonates did not induce resistance to Egh (Kogel et al., 1995). Nevertheless, the question arises whether or not jasmonates are involved in the interaction of barley with the powdery mildew fungus at the local site of infection. Using an immunocytological approach the analysis of leaf cross-sections from a susceptible barley cultivar and its near-isogenic mlo5-resistant line revealed no accumulation of JIP-23, the most abundant jasmonate inducible protein, neither in epidermal cells attacked by the pathogen nor in adjacent mesophyll cells. As a positive control, cross-sections from methyl jasmonate-treated leaf segments showed a strong signal for JIP-23 accumulation. Because the presence of the jasmonate-inducible protein is highly indicative for an already low threshold level of endogenous jasmonate (Lehmann et al., 1995), the lack of JIP-23 accumulation at the sites of attempted fungal infection clearly demonstrates the absence of enhanced levels of jasmonates. This excludes even a local rise of jasmonate confined to those single cells penetrated (Mlo genotype) or attacked (mlo5 genotype) by the fungus.
Publications

Görschen, E.; Dunaeva, M.; Hause, B.; Reeh, I.; Wasternack, C.; Parthier, B. Expression of the ribosome-inactivating protein JIP60 from barley in transgenic tobacco leads to an abnormal phenotype and alterations on the level of translation Planta 202, 470-478, (1997)

0
Publications

Wasternack, C.; Atzorn, R.; Leopold, J.; Feussner, I.; Rademacher, W.; Parthier, B. Synthesis of jasmonate-induced proteins in barley (<EM>Hordeum vulgare</EM>) is inhibited by the growth retardant tetcyclacis Physiol. Plantarum 94, 335-341, (1995)

0
Publications

Miersch, O.; Kramell, R.; Parthier, B.; Wasternack, C. Structure-activity relations of substituted, deleted or stereospecifically altered jasmonic acid in gene expression of barley leaves Phytochemistry 50, 353-361, (1999)

0
Publications

Ziegler, J.; Hamberg, M.; Miersch, O.; Parthier, B. Purification and characterization of allene oxide cyclase from dry corn seeds Plant Physiol. 114, 565-573, (1997)

0
Publications

Wasternack, C.; Parthier, B. Jasmonate-signalled gene expression Trends in Plant Sci. 2, 302-307, (1997)

0
Publications

Kramell, R.; Atzorn, R.; Schneider, G.; Miersch, O.; Brückner, C.; Schmidt, J.; Sembdner, G.; Parthier, B. Occurrence and identification of jasmonic acid and its amino acid conjugates induced by osmotic stress in barley leaf tissue J. Plant Growth Reg. 14, 29-36, (1995)

0
Publications

Kramell, R.; Miersch, O.; Atzorn, R.; Parthier, B.; Wasternack, C. Octadecanoid-derived alteration of gene expression and the 'oxylipin signature' in stressed barley leaves - implications for different signalling pathways Plant Physiol. 123, 177-186, (2000)

Stress-induced gene expression in barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Salome) leaves has been correlated with temporally changing levels of octadecanoids and jasmonates, quantified by means of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-single ion monitoring. Application of sorbitol-induced stress led to a low and transient rise of jasmonic acid (JA), its precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA) and the methyl esters JAME and OPDAME, respectively, followed by a large increase in their levels. JA and JAME peaked between 12 and 16 h, about 4 hours before OPDA and OPDAME. However, OPDA accumulated up to a 2.5-fold higher level than the other compounds. Dihomo-jasmonic acid and 9,13-didehydro-12- oxophytoenoic acid were identified as minor components. Kinetic analyses revealed that a transient threshold of jasmonates or octadecanoids is necessary and sufficient to initiate JA responsive gene expression. Although OPDA and OPDAME applied exogenously were metabolized to JA in considerable amounts, both of them can induce gene expression per se as evidenced by those genes which do not respond to endogenously formed JA. Also, coronatine induces JA-responsive genes independently from endogenous JA. As evidenced by application of deuterated JA, endogenous synthesis of JA is not induced by JA treatment. The data are discussed in terms of distinct signalling pathways.
Publications

Vörös, K.; Feussner, I.; Kühn, H.; Lee, J.; Graner, A.; Löbler, M.; Parthier, B.; Wasternack, C. Characterization of methyljasmonate-inducible lipoxygenase from barley (<EM>Hordeum vulgare</EM> cv. Salome) leaves Eur. J. Biochem. 251, 36-44, (1998)

0
Publications

Wasternack, C.; Atzorn, R.; Pena-Cortes, H.; Parthier, B. Alteration of gene expression by jasmonate and ABA in tobacco and tomato J. Plant Physiol. 147, 503-510, (1996)

0
IPB Mainnav Search