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Publications - Cell and Metabolic Biology

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Displaying results 181 to 190 of 409.

Publications

Wasternack, C., Hause, B., Stenzel, I., Goetz, S., Feussner, I. & Miersch, O. Jasmonate signaling in tomato the input of tissue-specific occurrence of allene oxide cyclase and JA metabolites. In: Current Advances in the Biochemistry and Cell Biology of Plant Lipids : Proceedings of the 17th International Symposium on Plant Lipids 2006 (Benning C., Ollrogge, J.). 107-111, (2007) ISBN: 978-1-4276-1965-5

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Publications

ten Hoopen, P., Hunger, A., Müller, A., Hause, B., Kramell, R., Wasternack, C., Rosahl, S. & Conrad, U. Immunomodulation of jasmonate to manipulate the wound response J. Exp. Botany 58, 2525-2535, (2007) DOI: 10.1093/jxb/erm122

Jasmonates are signals in plant stress responses and development. The exact mode of their action is still controversial. To modulate jasmonate levels intracellularly as well as compartment-specifically, transgenic Nicotiana tabacum plants expressing single-chain antibodies selected against the naturally occurring (3R,7R)-enantiomer of jasmonic acid (JA) were created in the cytosol and the endoplasmic reticulum. Consequently, the expression of anti-JA antibodies in planta caused JA-deficient phenotypes such as insensitivity of germinating transgenic seedlings towards methyl jasmonate and the loss of wound-induced gene expression. Results presented here suggest an essential role for cytosolic JA in the wound response of tobacco plants. The findings support the view that substrate availability takes part in regulating JA biosynthesis upon wounding. Moreover, high JA levels observed in immunomodulated plants in response to wounding suggest that tobacco plants are able to perceive a reduced level of physiologically active JA and attempt to compensate for this by increased JA accumulation. 

Publications

Phillips, M.A., Walter, M.H., Ralph, S., Dabrowska, P., Luck, K., Urós, E.V., Boland, W., Strack, D., Rodríguez-Concepción , M., Bohlmann, J. & Gershenzon, J. Functional identification and differential expression of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase and other MEP pathway genes in induced terpenoid resin formation of Norway spruce (Picea abies) Plant Mol. Biol 65, 243-257, (2007) DOI: 10.1007/s11103-007-9212-5

Conifers produce terpenoid-based oleoresins as constitutive and inducible defenses against herbivores and pathogens. Much information is available about the genes and enzymes of the late steps of oleoresin terpenoid biosynthesis in conifers, but almost nothing is known about the early steps which proceed via the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. Here we report the cDNA cloning and functional identification of three Norway spruce (Picea abies) genes encoding 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS), which catalyzes the first step of the MEP pathway, and their differential expression in the stems of young saplings. Among them are representatives of both types of plant DXS genes. A single type I DXS gene is constitutively expressed in bark tissue and not affected by wounding or fungal application. In contrast, two distinct type II DXS genes, PaDXS2A and PaDXS2B, showed increased transcript abundance after these treatments as did two other genes of the MEP pathway tested, 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR) and 4-hydroxyl 3-methylbutenyl diphosphate reductase (HDR). We also measured gene expression in a Norway spruce cell suspension culture system that, like intact trees, accumulates monoterpenes after treatment with methyl jasmonate. These cell cultures were characterized by an up-regulation of monoterpene synthase gene transcripts and enzyme activity after elicitor treatment, as well as induced formation of octadecanoids, including jasmonic acid and 12-oxophytodienoic acid. Among the Type II DXS genes in cell cultures, PaDXS2A was induced by treatment with chitosan, methyl salicylate, and Ceratocystis polonica (a bark beetle-associated, blue-staining fungal pathogen of Norway spruce). However, PaDXS2B was induced by treatment with methyl jasmonate and chitosan, but was not affected by methyl salicylate or C. polonica. Our results suggest distinct functions of the three DXS genes in primary and defensive terpenoid metabolism in Norway spruce.

Publications

Pühler, A. & Strack, D. Editorial. Molecular basics of mycorrhizal symbioses Phytochemistry 68, 67, (2007)

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Publications

Ober, D. & Strack, D. Editorial. Professor Thomas Hartmann 70th birthday on 2 February 2007 Phytochemistry 68, 265, (2007)

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Publications

Fester, T. & Hause, B. Drought and symbiosis - Why is abscisic acid necessary for arbuscular mycorrhiza? New Phytol 175, 383-386, (2007)

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Publications

Zum Felde, T., Baumert, A., Strack, D., Becker, H.C. & Möllers, C. Genetic variation for sinapate ester content in winter rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) and development of NIRS calibration equations Plant Breeding 126, 291-296, (2007)

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Publications

Gremillon, L., Kiessling, J., Hause, B., Decker, E.L., Reski, R. & Sarnighausen, E. Filamentous temperature-sensitive Z (FtsZ) isoforms specifically interact in the chloroplasts and in the cytosol of Physcomitrella patens New Phytol 176, 299310, (2007)

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Publications

Schaarschmidt, S., González, M.-C., Roitsch, T., Strack, D., Sonnewald, U. & Hause, B. Regulation of arbuscular mycorrhization by carbon. The symbiotic interaction cannot be im-proved by increased carbon availability accomplished by root-specifically enhanced invertase activity Plant Physiol 143, 1827-1840, (2007)

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Publications

Schaarschmidt, S., Kopka, J., Ludwig-Müller, J. & Hause, B. Regulation of arbuscular mycorrhization by apoplastic invertases: enhanced invertase activity in the leaf apoplast affects the symbiotic interaction Plant J 51, 390-405, (2007)

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