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Publications - Cell and Metabolic Biology

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Displaying results 101 to 110 of 409.

Books and chapters

Tissier, A. Trichome specific expression: promoters and their applications.. In: Trichome specific expression: promoters and their applications. In Transgenic Plants: Advances and Limitations, Yelda Ozden Çiftçi (Ed.) 353-378, (2012)

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Publications

Vadassery, J., Reichelt, M., Hause, B., Gershenzon, J., Boland, W. & Mithöfer, A. CML42-mediated calcium signaling co-ordinates responses to Spodoptera herbivory and abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis. Plant Physiol 159, 1159-1175, (2012)

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Publications

Sallaud, C., Giacalone, C., Töpfer, R., Goepfert, S., Bakaher, N., Rösti, S. & Tissier, A. Characterization of two genes for the biosynthesis of the labdane diterpene Z-abienol in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) glandular trichomes. Plant J 72, 1-17, (2012)

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Publications

Werner, S., Engler, C., Weber, E., Gruetzner, R. & Marillonnet, S. Fast track assembly of multigene constructs using Golden Gate cloning and the MoClo system. Bioeng Bugs 3, (2012)

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Publications

Gaupels, F., Sarioglu, H., Beckmann, M., Hause, B., Spannagl, M., Draper, J., Lindermayr, C. & Durner, J. Deciphering systemic wound responses of the pumpkin extrafascicular phloem by metabolomics and stable isotope-coded protein labeling (ICPL). Plant Physiol 160, 2285-2299, (2012)

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Publications

Bleeker, P.M., Mirabella, R., Diergaarde, P.J., Vandoorn, A., Tissier, A., Kant, M.R., Prins, M., de Vos, M., Haring, M.A. & Schuurink, R.C. Improved herbivore resistance in cultivated tomato with the sesquiterpene biosynthetic pathway from a wild relative. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109, 20124-20129, (2012)

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Publications

Tissier, A. Glandular trichomes: what comes after expressed sequence tags? Plant J 70, 51-68, (2012)

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Publications

Wirsing, L., Naumann, K. & Vogt, T. Arabidopsis methyltransferase fingerprints by affinity-based protein profiling Anal Biochem 408, 220-225, (2011) DOI: 10.1016/j.ab.2010.09.029

Precise annotation of time and spatial distribution of enzymes involved in plant secondary metabolism by gel electrophoresis are usually difficult due to their low abundance. Therefore, effective methods to enrich these enzymes are required to correlate available transcript and metabolite data with the actual presence of active enzymes in wild-type and mutant plants or to monitor variations of these enzymes under various types of biotic and abiotic stress conditions. S-Adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent O-methyltransferases play important roles in the modification of natural products such as phenylpropanoids or alkaloids. In plants they occur as small superfamilies with defined roles for each of its members in different organs and tissues. We explored the use of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine as a selectivity function in affinity-based protein profiling supported by capture compound mass spectrometry. Due to their high affinity to this ligand it was possible to identify developmental changes of flower-specific patterns of plant natural product O-methyltransferases and corroborate the absence of individual O-methyltransferases in the corresponding Arabidopsis knockout lines. Developmental changes in the OMT pattern were correlated with transcript data obtained by qPCR.

Publications

Clauß, K., von Roepenack-Lahaye, E., Böttcher, C., Roth, M.R., Welti, R., Erban, A., Kopka, J., Scheel, D., Milkowski, K. & Strack, D. Overexpression of Sinapine Esterase BnSCE3 in Oilseed Rape Seeds Triggers Global Changes n Seed Metabolism Plant Physiol. 155, 1127-1145, (2011) DOI: 10.1104/pp.110.169821

Sinapine (O-sinapoylcholine) is the predominant phenolic compound in a complex group of sinapate esters in seeds of oilseed rape (Brassica napus). Sinapine has antinutritive activity and prevents the use of seed protein for food and feed. A strategy was developed to lower its content in seeds by expressing an enzyme that hydrolyzes sinapine in developing rape seeds. During early stages of seedling development, a sinapine esterase (BnSCE3) hydrolyzes sinapine, releasing choline and sinapate. A portion of choline enters the phospholipid metabolism, and sinapate is routed via 1-O-sinapoyl-β-glucose into sinapoylmalate. Transgenic oilseed rape lines were generated expressing BnSCE3 under the control of a seed-specific promoter. Two distinct single-copy transgene insertion lines were isolated and propagated to generate homozygous lines, which were subjected to comprehensive phenotyping. Sinapine levels of transgenic seeds were less than 5% of wild-type levels, whereas choline levels were increased. Weight, size, and water content of transgenic seeds were significantly higher than those of wild-type seeds. Seed quality parameters, such as fiber and glucosinolate levels, and agronomically important traits, such as oil and protein contents, differed only slightly, except that amounts of hemicellulose and cellulose were about 30% higher in transgenic compared with wild-type seeds. Electron microscopic examination revealed that a fraction of the transgenic seeds had morphological alterations, characterized by large cavities near the embryonic tissue. Transgenic seedlings were larger than wild-type seedlings, and young seedlings exhibited longer hypocotyls. Examination of metabolic profiles of transgenic seeds indicated that besides suppression of sinapine accumulation, there were other dramatic differences in primary and secondary metabolism. Mapping of these changes onto metabolic pathways revealed global effects of the transgenic BnSCE3 expression on seed metabolism. 

Publications

Zdyb, A., Demchenko, K., Heumann, J., Mrosk, C., Grzeganek, P., Göbel, C., Feussner, I., Pawlowski, K. & Hause, B. Jasmonate biosynthesis in legume and actinorhizal nodules New Phytol 189, 568-579 , (2011)

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