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Publications

Hoffmann, N.; Rein, J.; Sachsenberg, T.; Hartler, J.; Haug, K.; Mayer, G.; Alka, O.; Dayalan, S.; Pearce, J. T. M.; Rocca-Serra, P.; Qi, D.; Eisenacher, M.; Perez-Riverol, Y.; Vizcaíno, J. A.; Salek, R. M.; Neumann, S.; Jones, A. R. mzTab-M: A Data Standard for Sharing Quantitative Results in Mass Spectrometry Metabolomics Anal Chem 91, 3302-3310, (2019) DOI: 10.1021/acs.analchem.8b04310

Mass spectrometry (MS) is one of the primary techniques used for large-scale analysis of small molecules in metabolomics studies. To date, there has been little data format standardization in this field, as different software packages export results in different formats represented in XML or plain text, making data sharing, database deposition, and reanalysis highly challenging. Working within the consortia of the Metabolomics Standards Initiative, Proteomics Standards Initiative, and the Metabolomics Society, we have created mzTab-M to act as a common output format from analytical approaches using MS on small molecules. The format has been developed over several years, with input from a wide range of stakeholders. mzTab-M is a simple tab-separated text format, but importantly, the structure is highly standardized through the design of a detailed specification document, tightly coupled to validation software, and a mandatory controlled vocabulary of terms to populate it. The format is able to represent final quantification values from analyses, as well as the evidence trail in terms of features measured directly from MS (e.g., LC-MS, GC-MS, DIMS, etc.) and different types of approaches used to identify molecules. mzTab-M allows for ambiguity in the identification of molecules to be communicated clearly to readers of the files (both people and software). There are several implementations of the format available, and we anticipate widespread adoption in the field.
Printed publications

Emami Khoonsari, P.; Moreno, P.; Bergmann, S.; Burman, J.; Capuccini, M.; Carone, M.; Cascante, M.; de Atauri, P.; Foguet, C.; Gonzalez-Beltran, A.; Hankemeier, T.; Haug, K.; He, S.; Herman, S.; Johnson, D.; Kale, N.; Larsson, A.; Neumann, S.; Peters, K.; Pireddu, L.; Rocca-Serra, P.; Roger, P.; Rueedi, R.; Ruttkies, C.; Sadawi, N.; Salek, R. M.; Sansone, S.-A.; Schober, D.; Selivanov, V.; Thévenot, E. A.; van Vliet, M.; Zanetti, G.; Steinbeck, C.; Kultima, K.; Spjuth, O. Interoperable and scalable data analysis with microservices: Applications in Metabolomics Bioinformatics (2019) DOI: 10.1093/bioinformatics/btz160

MotivationDeveloping a robust and performant data analysis workflow that integrates all necessary components whilst still being able to scale over multiple compute nodes is a challenging task. We introduce a generic method based on the microservice architecture, where software tools are encapsulated as Docker containers that can be connected into scientific workflows and executed using the Kubernetes container orchestrator.ResultsWe developed a virtual research environment which facilitates rapid integration of new tools and developing scalable and interoperable workflows for performing metabolomics data analysis. The environment can be launched on-demand on cloud resources and desktop computers. IT-expertise requirements on the user side are kept to a minimum, and workflows can be re-used effortlessly by any novice user. We validate our method in the field of metabolomics on two mass spectrometry, one nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and one fluxomics study. We showed that the method scales dynamically with increasing availability of computational resources. We demonstrated that the method facilitates interoperability using integration of the major software suites resulting in a turn-key workflow encompassing all steps for mass-spectrometry-based metabolomics including preprocessing, statistics, and identification. Microservices is a generic methodology that can serve any scientific discipline and opens up for new types of large-scale integrative science.Availability and ImplementationThe PhenoMeNal consortium maintains a web portal (https://portal.phenomenal-h2020.eu) providing a GUI for launching the virtual research environment. The GitHub repository https://github.com/phnmnl/ hosts the source code of all projects.
Publications

Peters, K.; Bradbury, J.; Bergmann, S.; Capuccini, M.; Cascante, M.; de Atauri, P.; Ebbels, T. M. D.; Foguet, C.; Glen, R.; Gonzalez-Beltran, A.; Günther, U. L.; Handakas, E.; Hankemeier, T.; Haug, K.; Herman, S.; Holub, P.; Izzo, M.; Jacob, D.; Johnson, D.; Jourdan, F.; Kale, N.; Karaman, I.; Khalili, B.; Emami Khonsari, P.; Kultima, K.; Lampa, S.; Larsson, A.; Ludwig, C.; Moreno, P.; Neumann, S.; Novella, J. A.; O'Donovan, C.; Pearce, J. T. M.; Peluso, A.; Piras, M. E.; Pireddu, L.; Reed, M. A. C.; Rocca-Serra, P.; Roger, P.; Rosato, A.; Rueedi, R.; Ruttkies, C.; Sadawi, N.; Salek, R. M.; Sansone, S.-A.; Selivanov, V.; Spjuth, O.; Schober, D.; Thévenot, E. A.; Tomasoni, M.; van Rijswijk, M.; van Vliet, M.; Viant, M. R.; Weber, R. J. M.; Zanetti, G.; Steinbeck, C. PhenoMeNal: processing and analysis of metabolomics data in the cloud GigaScience 8, giy149, (2019) DOI: 10.1093/gigascience/giy149

BackgroundMetabolomics is the comprehensive study of a multitude of small molecules to gain insight into an organism's metabolism. The research field is dynamic and expanding with applications across biomedical, biotechnological, and many other applied biological domains. Its computationally intensive nature has driven requirements for open data formats, data repositories, and data analysis tools. However, the rapid progress has resulted in a mosaic of independent, and sometimes incompatible, analysis methods that are difficult to connect into a useful and complete data analysis solution.FindingsPhenoMeNal (Phenome and Metabolome aNalysis) is an advanced and complete solution to set up Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) that brings workflow-oriented, interoperable metabolomics data analysis platforms into the cloud. PhenoMeNal seamlessly integrates a wide array of existing open-source tools that are tested and packaged as Docker containers through the project's continuous integration process and deployed based on a kubernetes orchestration framework. It also provides a number of standardized, automated, and published analysis workflows in the user interfaces Galaxy, Jupyter, Luigi, and Pachyderm.ConclusionsPhenoMeNal constitutes a keystone solution in cloud e-infrastructures available for metabolomics. PhenoMeNal is a unique and complete solution for setting up cloud e-infrastructures through easy-to-use web interfaces that can be scaled to any custom public and private cloud environment. By harmonizing and automating software installation and configuration and through ready-to-use scientific workflow user interfaces, PhenoMeNal has succeeded in providing scientists with workflow-driven, reproducible, and shareable metabolomics data analysis platforms that are interfaced through standard data formats, representative datasets, versioned, and have been tested for reproducibility and interoperability. The elastic implementation of PhenoMeNal further allows easy adaptation of the infrastructure to other application areas and ‘omics research domains.
Publications

Ruttkies, C.; Schymanski, E. L.; Strehmel, N.; Hollender, J.; Neumann, S.; Williams, A. J.; Krauss, M. Supporting non-target identification by adding hydrogen deuterium exchange MS/MS capabilities to MetFrag Anal Bioanal Chem 411, 4683-4700, (2019) DOI: 10.1007/s00216-019-01885-0

Liquid chromatography coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) is increasingly popular for the non-targeted exploration of complex samples, where tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is used to characterize the structure of unknown compounds. However, mass spectra do not always contain sufficient information to unequivocally identify the correct structure. This study investigated how much additional information can be gained using hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) experiments. The exchange of “easily exchangeable” hydrogen atoms (connected to heteroatoms), with predominantly [M+D]+ ions in positive mode and [M-D]− in negative mode was observed. To enable high-throughput processing, new scoring terms were incorporated into the in silico fragmenter MetFrag. These were initially developed on small datasets and then tested on 762 compounds of environmental interest. Pairs of spectra (normal and deuterated) were found for 593 of these substances (506 positive mode, 155 negative mode spectra). The new scoring terms resulted in 29 additional correct identifications (78 vs 49) for positive mode and an increase in top 10 rankings from 80 to 106 in negative mode. Compounds with dual functionality (polar head group, long apolar tail) exhibited dramatic retention time (RT) shifts of up to several minutes, compared with an average 0.04 min RT shift. For a smaller dataset of 80 metabolites, top 10 rankings improved from 13 to 24 (positive mode, 57 spectra) and from 14 to 31 (negative mode, 63 spectra) when including HDX information. The results of standard measurements were confirmed using targets and tentatively identified surfactant species in an environmental sample collected from the river Danube near Novi Sad (Serbia). The changes to MetFrag have been integrated into the command line version available at http://c-ruttkies.github.io/MetFrag and all resulting spectra and compounds are available in online resources and in the Electronic Supplementary Material (ESM).
Publications

Ruttkies, C.; Neumann, S.; Posch, S. Improving MetFrag with statistical learning of fragment annotations BMC Bioinformatics 20, 376, (2019) DOI: 10.1186/s12859-019-2954-7

BackgroundMolecule identification is a crucial step in metabolomics and environmental sciences. Besides in silico fragmentation, as performed by MetFrag, also machine learning and statistical methods evolved, showing an improvement in molecule annotation based on MS/MS data. In this work we present a new statistical scoring method where annotations of m/z fragment peaks to fragment-structures are learned in a training step. Based on a Bayesian model, two additional scoring terms are integrated into the new MetFrag2.4.5 and evaluated on the test data set of the CASMI 2016 contest.ResultsThe results on the 87 MS/MS spectra from positive and negative mode show a substantial improvement of the results compared to submissions made by the former MetFrag approach. Top1 rankings increased from 5 to 21 and Top10 rankings from 39 to 55 both showing higher values than for CSI:IOKR, the winner of the CASMI 2016 contest. For the negative mode spectra, MetFrag’s statistical scoring outperforms all other participants which submitted results for this type of spectra.ConclusionsThis study shows how statistical learning can improve molecular structure identification based on MS/MS data compared on the same method using combinatorial in silico fragmentation only. MetFrag2.4.5 shows especially in negative mode a better performance compared to the other participating approaches.
Publications

Moreno-Pedraza, A.; Gabriel, J.; Treutler, H.; Winkler, R.; Vergara, F. Effects of Water Availability in the Soil on Tropane Alkaloid Production in Cultivated Datura stramonium Metabolites 9, 131, (2019) DOI: 10.3390/metabo9070131

Background: different Solanaceae and Erythroxylaceae species produce tropane alkaloids. These alkaloids are the starting material in the production of different pharmaceuticals. The commercial demand for tropane alkaloids is covered by extracting them from cultivated plants. Datura stramonium is cultivated under greenhouse conditions as a source of tropane alkaloids. Here we investigate the effect of different levels of water availability in the soil on the production of tropane alkaloids by D. stramonium. Methods: We tested four irrigation levels on the accumulation of tropane alkaloids. We analyzed the profile of tropane alkaloids using an untargeted liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry method. Results: Using a combination of informatics and manual interpretation of mass spectra, we generated several structure hypotheses for signals in D. stramonium extracts that we assign as putative tropane alkaloids. Quantitation of mass spectrometry signals for our structure hypotheses across different anatomical organs allowed us to identify patterns of tropane alkaloids associated with different levels of irrigation. Furthermore, we identified anatomic partitioning of tropane alkaloid isomers with pharmaceutical applications. Conclusions: Our results show that soil water availability is an effective method for maximizing the production of specific tropane alkaloids for industrial applications.
Publications

Püllmann, P.; Ulpinnis, C.; Marillonnet, S.; Gruetzner, R.; Neumann, S.; Weissenborn, M. J. Golden Mutagenesis: An efficient multi-site-saturation mutagenesis approach by Golden Gate cloning with automated primer design Sci Rep 9, 10932, (2019) DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-47376-1

Site-directed methods for the generation of genetic diversity are essential tools in the field of directed enzyme evolution. The Golden Gate cloning technique has been proven to be an efficient tool for a variety of cloning setups. The utilization of restriction enzymes which cut outside of their recognition domain allows the assembly of multiple gene fragments obtained by PCR amplification without altering the open reading frame of the reconstituted gene. We have developed a protocol, termed Golden Mutagenesis that allows the rapid, straightforward, reliable and inexpensive construction of mutagenesis libraries. One to five amino acid positions within a coding sequence could be altered simultaneously using a protocol which can be performed within one day. To facilitate the implementation of this technique, a software library and web application for automated primer design and for the graphical evaluation of the randomization success based on the sequencing results was developed. This allows facile primer design and application of Golden Mutagenesis also for laboratories, which are not specialized in molecular biology.
Books and chapters

Neumann, S.; Yanes, O.; Mumm, R.; Franceschi, P. Mass Spectrometry Data Processing (Wehrens, R. & Salek, R., eds.). (2019) ISBN: 9781498725262

The chapter “Mass Spectrometry Data Processing” focuses on the mass spectrometry data processing workflow. The first step consists of processing the raw MS data using conversion of vendor formats to open standards, followed by feature detection, optionally retention time correction and grouping of features across samples leading to a feature matrix amenable for statistical analysis. The metabolomics community has developed several open source software packages capable of processing large-scale data commonly occurring in metabolomics studies. In the second stage, features of interest are identified, i.e., annotated with names of metabolites, or compound classes. Tandem MS or LC-MS/MS fragmentation data provides structural hints. The MS/MS spectra can be used to search in open and commercial spectral libraries. If no reference spectra are available, in-silico annotation tools or more recently machine learning approaches can be used.
Publications

Khoonsari, P. E.; Moreno, P.; Bergmann, S.; Burman, J.; Capuccini, M.; Carone, M.; Cascante, M.; de Atauri, P.; Foguet, C.; Gonzalez-Beltran, A.; Hankemeier, T.; Haug, K.; He, S.; Herman, S.; Johnson, D.; Kale, N.; Larsson, A.; Neumann, S.; Peters, K.; Pireddu, L.; Rocca-Serra, P.; Roger, P.; Rueedi, R.; Ruttkies, C.; Sadawi, N.; Salek, R. M.; Sansone, S.-A.; Schober, D.; Selivanov, V.; Thévenot, E. A.; van Vliet, M.; Zanetti, G.; Steinbeck, C.; Kultima, K.; Spjuth, O. Interoperable and scalable data analysis with microservices: Applications in Metabolomics BioRxiv (2018) DOI: 10.1101/213603

Developing a robust and performant data analysis workflow that integrates all necessary components whilst still being able to scale over multiple compute nodes is a challenging task. We introduce a generic method based on the microservice architecture, where software tools are encapsulated as Docker containers that can be connected into scientific workflows and executed in parallel using the Kubernetes container orchestrator. The access point is a virtual research environment which can be launched on-demand on cloud resources and desktop computers. IT-expertise requirements on the user side are kept to a minimum, and established workflows can be re-used effortlessly by any novice user. We validate our method in the field of metabolomics on two mass spectrometry studies, one nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study and one fluxomics study, showing that the method scales dynamically with increasing availability of computational resources. We achieved a complete integration of the major software suites resulting in the first turn-key workflow encompassing all steps for mass-spectrometry-based metabolomics including preprocessing, multivariate statistics, and metabolite identification. Microservices is a generic methodology that can serve any scientific discipline and opens up for new types of large-scale integrative science.
Publications

Peters, K.; Bradbury, J.; Bergmann, S.; Capuccini, M.; Cascante, M.; de Atauri, P.; Ebbels, T.; Foguet, C.; Glen, R.; Gonzalez-Beltran, A.; Guenther, U.; Handakas, E.; Hankemeier, T.; Herman, S.; Haug, K.; Holub, P.; Izzo, M.; Jacob, D.; Johnson, D.; Jourdan, F.; Kale, N.; Karaman, I.; Khalili, B.; Khoonsari, P. E.; Kultima, K.; Lampa, S.; Larsson, A.; Ludwig, C.; Moreno, P.; Neumann, S.; Novella, J. A.; O'Donovan, C.; Pearce, J. T. M.; Peluso, A.; Pireddu, L.; Piras, M. E.; Reed, M. A. C.; Rocca-Serra, P.; Roger, P.; Rosato, A.; Rueedi, R.; Ruttkies, C.; Sadawi, N.; Salek, R.; Sansone, S.-A.; Selivanov, V.; Spjuth, O.; Schober, D.; Thévenot, E. A.; Tomasoni, M.; Rijswijk, M.; Vliet, M.; Viant, M.; Weber, R.; Zanetti, G.; Steinbeck, C. PhenoMeNal: Processing and analysis of Metabolomics data in the Cloud bioRxiv (2018) DOI: 10.1101/409151

Background: Metabolomics is the comprehensive study of a multitude of small molecules to gain insight into an organism's metabolism. The research field is dynamic and expanding with applications across biomedical, biotechnological and many other applied biological domains. Its computationally-intensive nature has driven requirements for open data formats, data repositories and data analysis tools. However, the rapid progress has resulted in a mosaic of independent, and sometimes incompatible, analysis methods that are difficult to connect into a useful and complete data analysis solution. Findings: The PhenoMeNal (Phenome and Metabolome aNalysis) e-infrastructure provides a complete, workflow-oriented, interoperable metabolomics data analysis solution for a modern infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) cloud platform. PhenoMeNal seamlessly integrates a wide array of existing open source tools which are tested and packaged as Docker containers through the project's continuous integration process and deployed based on a kubernetes orchestration framework. It also provides a number of standardized, automated and published analysis workflows in the user interfaces Galaxy, Jupyter, Luigi and Pachyderm. Conclusions: PhenoMeNal constitutes a keystone solution in cloud infrastructures available for metabolomics. It provides scientists with a ready-to-use, workflow-driven, reproducible and shareable data analysis platform harmonizing the software installation and configuration through user-friendly web interfaces. The deployed cloud environments can be dynamically scaled to enable large-scale analyses which are interfaced through standard data formats, versioned, and have been tested for reproducibility and interoperability. The flexible implementation of PhenoMeNal allows easy adaptation of the infrastructure to other application areas and 'omics research domains.
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