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Publications - Stress and Develop Biology

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Publications

Knogge, W.; Scheel, D. LysM receptors recognize friend and foe PNAS 103, 10829-10830, (2006) DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0604601103

Chitin, a β(1→ 4)-linked polymer of N-acetylglucosamine, is the second-most abundant polysaccharide in nature after cellulose and serves as a major structural component in the exoskeleton of arthropods and in the cell walls of fungi. The latter include some of the most important pathogens of plants. Upon microbial attack, plants normally mount a multicomponent defense response that efficiently stops the invasion. This important and durable type of plant disease resistance is called species or nonhost resistance. To become pathogenic, a microbe needs to “learn” to suppress the defense response of a plant species, thereby turning it into a host species. Nonhost resistance is based on a non-self recognition system that perceives at the site of attempted penetration typical microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), which normally do not occur in plants (1). Prominent MAMPs recognized by plant cells are chitin fragments (chitooligosaccharides) released from fungal cell walls during pathogen attack, which in many plants elicit the plant defense response (oxidative burst, protein phosphorylation, transcriptional activation of defense-related genes, phytoalexin biosynthesis, etc.). High-affinity binding sites were found in suspension-cultured rice and tomato cells (2, 3), and a 75-kDa chitooligosaccharide-binding protein was identified in rice plasma membranes by affinity labeling and cross-linking (4). Results from inhibitor studies using different oligosaccharides were in good agreement with the activities of these oligosaccharides in the induction of phytoalexin biosynthesis and of other cellular responses. Although this suggested the 75-kDa protein to be the functional receptor for the chitooligosaccharide elicitor, the receptor protein at first remained elusive. In this issue of PNAS, Kaku et al. (5) report on the purification of the chitin oligomer-binding protein (CEBiP) from rice and the cloning of its gene. It encodes a 356-aa protein with a … 
Publications

Lübken, T.; Arnold, N.; Wessjohann, L.; Böttcher, C.; Schmidt, J. Analysis of fungal cyclopentenone derivatives from Hygrophorus spp. by liquid chromatography/electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry. J Mass Spectrom. 41, 361-71, (2006) DOI: 10.1002/jms.996

Fruitbodies of the genus Hygrophorus (Basidiomycetes) contain a series of anti-biologically active compounds. These substances named hygrophorones possess a cyclopentenone skeleton. LC/ESI-MS/MS presents a valuable tool for the identification of such compounds. The mass spectral behaviour of typical selected members of this group under positive and negative ion electrospray conditions is discussed. Using the ESI collision-induced dissociation (CID) mass spectra of the [M + H]+ and [M − H]− ions, respectively, the compounds can be classified with respect to the substitution pattern at the cyclopentenone ring and the type of oxygenation at C-6 (hydroxy/acetoxy or oxo function) of the side chain. The elemental composition of the fragment ions was determined by ESI-QqTOF measurements. Thus, in case of the negative ion CID mass spectra an unusual loss of CO2 from the deprotonated molecular ions could be observed.
Publications

Clemens, S. Toxic metal accumulation, responses to exposure and mechanisms of tolerance in plants Biochimie 88, 1707-1719, (2006) DOI: 10.1016/j.biochi.2006.07.003

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Publications

Hamel, L.P.; Nicole, M.C.; Sritubtim, S.; Morency, M.J.; Ellis, M.; Ehlting, J.; Beaudoin, N.; Barbazuk, B.; Klessig, D.; Lee, J.; Martin, G.; Mundy, J.; Ohashi, Y.; Scheel, D.; Sheen, J.; Xing, T.; Zhang, S.; Seguin, A.; Ellis, B.E. Ancient signals: comparative genomics of plant MAPK and MAPKK gene families Trends Plant Sci 11, 192-198, (2006) DOI: 10.1016/j.tplants.2006.02.007

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Publications

Consonni, C.; Humphry, M.E.; Hartmann, H.A.; Livaja, M.; Durner, J.; Westphal, L.; Vogel, J.; Lipka, V.; Kemmerling, B.; Schulze-Lefert, P.; Somerville, S.C.; Panstruga, R. Conserved requirement for a plant host cell protein in powdery mildew pathogenesis Nat. Genet 38, 716-20, (2006) DOI: 10.1038/ng1806

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Publications

Weber, M.; Trampczynska, A.; Clemens, S. Comparative transcriptome analysis of toxic metal responses in Arabidopsis thaliana and the Cd2+-hypertolerant facultative metallophyte Arabidopsis halleri Plant, Cell and Environ 29, 950-963, (2006) DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-3040.2005.01479.x

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Publications

Halim, V.A.; Vess, A.; Scheel, D.; Rosahl, S. The role of salicylic acid and jasmonic acid in pathogen defence Plant Biology 8, 307-313, (2006) DOI: 10.1055/s-2006-924025

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Publications

Qutob, D.; Kemmerling, B.; Brunner, F.; Küfner, I.; Engelhardt, S.; Gust, A.A.; Luberacki, B.; Seitz, H.U.; Stahl, D.; Rauhut, T.; Glawischnig, E.; Schween, G.; Lacombe, B.; Watanabe, N.; Lam, E.; Schlichting, R.; Scheel, D.; Nau, K.; Dodt, G.; Hubert, D. Phytotoxicity and innate immune responses induced by NEP1-like proteins Plant Cell 18, 3721-3744, (2006) DOI: 10.1105/tpc.106.044180

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Publications

Birschwilks, M.; Haupt, S.; Hofius, D.; Neumann, S. Transfer of phloem-mobile substances from the host plants to the holoparasite Cuscuta sp. Journal of Experimental Botany 4, 911-921, (2006) DOI: 10.1093/jxb/erj076

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