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Publications - Stress and Develop Biology

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Displaying results 1 to 10 of 17.

Books and chapters

Scheel, D.; Wasternack, C. Signal transduction in plants: Cross-talk with the environment (Scheel, D., Wasternack, C.). University Press, Oxford, UK 1-5, (2002)

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Publications

Brunner, F.; Rosahl, S.; Lee, J.; Rudd, J.J.; Geiler, C.; Kauppinen, S.; Rasmussen, G.; Scheel, D.; Nürnberger, T. Pep-13, a plant defense-inducing pathogen-associated pattern from <em>Phytophthora transglutaminases</em> EMBO J 21, 6681-6688, (2002)

Innate immunity, an ancient form of defense against microbial infection, is well described for animals and is also suggested to be important for plants. Discrimination from self is achieved through receptors that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) not found in the host. PAMPs are evolutionarily conserved structures which are functionally important and, thus, not subject to frequent mutation. Here we report that the previously described peptide elicitor of defense responses in parsley, Pep-13, constitutes a surface-exposed fragment within a novel calcium-dependent cell wall transglutaminase (TGase) from Phytophthora sojae. TGase transcripts and TGase activity are detectable in all Phytophthora species analyzed, among which are some of the most destructive plant pathogens. Mutational analysis within Pep-13 identified the same amino acids indispensable for both TGase and defense-eliciting activity. Pep-13, conserved among Phytophthora TGases, activates defense in parsley and potato, suggesting its function as a genus-specific recognition determinant for the activation of plant defense in host and non-host plants. In summary, plants may recognize PAMPs with characteristics resembling those known to trigger innate immune responses in animals.
Publications

Landtag, J.; Baumert, A.; Degenkolb, T.; Schmidt, J.; Wray, V.; Scheel, D.; Strack, D.; Rosahl, S. Accumulation of tyrosol glucoside in transgenic potato plants expressing a parsley tyrosine decarboxylase Phytochemistry 60, 683-689, (2002) DOI: 10.1016/S0031-9422(02)00161-9

As part of the response to pathogen infection, potato plants accumulate soluble and cell wall-bound phenolics such as hydroxycinnamic acid tyramine amides. Since incorporation of these compounds into the cell wall leads to a fortified barrier against pathogens, raising the amounts of hydroxycinnamic acid tyramine amides might positively affect the resistance response. To this end, we set out to increase the amount of tyramine, one of the substrates of the hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:tyramine N-(hydroxycinnamoyl)-transferase reaction, by placing a cDNA encoding a pathogen-induced tyrosine decarboxylase from paisley under the control of the 35S promoter and introducing the construct into potato plants via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. While no alterations were observed in the pattern and quantity of cell wall-bound phenolic compounds in transgenic plants, the soluble fraction contained several new compounds. The major one was isolated and identified as tyrosol glucoside by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-high resolution mass spectrometry and NMR analyses. Our results indicate that expression of a tyrosine decarboxylase in potato does not channel tyramine into the hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:tyramine N-(hydroxycinnamoyl)-transferase reaction but rather unexpectedly, into a different pathway leading to the formation of a potential storage compound.
Publications

Landgraf, P.; Feussner, I.; Hunger, A.; Scheel, D.; Rosahl, S. Systemic accumulation of 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid in SAR-induced potato plants Europ J Plant Pathol 279-283, (2002)

In potato plants induced for systemic resistance by infiltration with Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola, 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) accumulated in infiltrated leaves as well as in non-treated leaves of infected plants. In contrast, jasmonic acid (JA) levels increased only in infiltrated leaves, suggesting that the biosynthetic precursor of JA, OPDA, might play a role in systemic acquired resistance.
Books and chapters

Scheel, D. Oxidative burst and the role of reactive oxygen species in plant-pathogen interactions (Inzé, D., van Montagu, M.). Taylor & Francis, London, UK 137-153, (2002)

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Publications

Ichimura, K.; Shinozaki, K.; Tena, G.; Sheen, J.; Henry, Y.; Champion, A.; Kreis, M.; Zhang, S.; Hirt, H.; Wilson, C.; Heberle-Bors, E.; Ellis, B.E.; Morris, P.C.; Innes, R.W.; Ecker, J.R.; Scheel, D.; Klessig, D.F.; Machida,Y.; Mundy, J.; Ohashi, Y.; Walker, J.C. Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades in plants: a new nomenclature Trends Plant Sci. 7, 301-308, (2002)

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Publications

Varet, A.; Parker, J.; Tornero, P.; Nass, N.; Nürnberger, T.; Dangl, J.L.; Scheel, D.; Lee, J. NHL25 and NHL3, two NDR1/HIN1-like genes in <EM>Arabidopsis thaliana</em> with potential role(s) in plant defense Molec. Plant-Microbe Interact. 15, 608-616, (2002)

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Publications

Göbel, C.; Feussner, I.; Hamberg, M.; Rosahl, S. Oxylipin profiling in pathogen-infected potato leaves Biochim Biophys Acta Mol Cell Biol Lipids 1584, 55-64, (2002)

Plants respond to pathogen attack with a multicomponent defense response. Synthesis of oxylipins via the lipoxygenase (LOX) pathway appears to be an important factor for establishment of resistance in a number of pathosystems. In potato cells, pathogen-derived elicitors preferentially stimulate the 9-LOX-dependent metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Here we show by oxylipin profiling that potato plants react to pathogen infection with increases in the amounts of the 9-LOX-derived 9,10,11- and 9,12,13-trihydroxy derivatives of linolenic acid (LnA), the divinyl ethers colnelenic acid (CnA) and colneleic acid (CA) as well as 9-hydroxy linolenic acid. Accumulation of these compounds is faster and more pronounced during the interaction of potato with the phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola, which does not lead to disease, compared to the infection of potato with Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight disease. Jasmonic acid (JA), a 13-LOX-derived oxylipin, accumulates in potato leaves after infiltration with P. syringae pv. maculicola, but not after infection with P. infestans.
Publications

Lee, J.; Rudd, J.J. Calcium-dependent protein kinases: versatile plant signalling components necessary for pathogen defence Trends Plant Sci 7, 97-98, (2002)

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