jump to searchjump to navigationjump to content

Publications - Stress and Develop Biology

Sort by: Year Type of publication

Displaying results 1 to 2 of 2.

Publications

Khoonsari, P. E.; Moreno, P.; Bergmann, S.; Burman, J.; Capuccini, M.; Carone, M.; Cascante, M.; de Atauri, P.; Foguet, C.; Gonzalez-Beltran, A.; Hankemeier, T.; Haug, K.; He, S.; Herman, S.; Johnson, D.; Kale, N.; Larsson, A.; Neumann, S.; Peters, K.; Pireddu, L.; Rocca-Serra, P.; Roger, P.; Rueedi, R.; Ruttkies, C.; Sadawi, N.; Salek, R. M.; Sansone, S.-A.; Schober, D.; Selivanov, V.; Thévenot, E. A.; van Vliet, M.; Zanetti, G.; Steinbeck, C.; Kultima, K.; Spjuth, O. Interoperable and scalable data analysis with microservices: Applications in Metabolomics BioRxiv (2018) DOI: 10.1101/213603

Developing a robust and performant data analysis workflow that integrates all necessary components whilst still being able to scale over multiple compute nodes is a challenging task. We introduce a generic method based on the microservice architecture, where software tools are encapsulated as Docker containers that can be connected into scientific workflows and executed in parallel using the Kubernetes container orchestrator. The access point is a virtual research environment which can be launched on-demand on cloud resources and desktop computers. IT-expertise requirements on the user side are kept to a minimum, and established workflows can be re-used effortlessly by any novice user. We validate our method in the field of metabolomics on two mass spectrometry studies, one nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study and one fluxomics study, showing that the method scales dynamically with increasing availability of computational resources. We achieved a complete integration of the major software suites resulting in the first turn-key workflow encompassing all steps for mass-spectrometry-based metabolomics including preprocessing, multivariate statistics, and metabolite identification. Microservices is a generic methodology that can serve any scientific discipline and opens up for new types of large-scale integrative science.
Printed publications

Teh, O.-K.; Lee, C.-W.; Ditengou, F. A.; Klecker, T.; Furlan, G.; Zietz, M.; Hause, G.; Eschen-Lippold, L.; Hoehenwarter, W.; Lee, J.; Ott, T.; Trujillo, M. Phosphorylation of the exocyst subunit Exo70B2 contributes to the regulation of its function BioRxiv (2018) DOI: 10.1101/266171

The exocyst is a conserved hetero-octameric complex mediating early tethering during exocytosis. Its Exo70 subunit plays a critical role as a spatiotemporal regulator by mediating numerous protein and lipid interactions. However, a molecular understanding of the exocyst function remains challenging. We show that Exo70B2 locates to dynamic foci at the plasma membrane and transits through a BFA-sensitive compartment, reflecting its canonical function in secretion. However, treatment with the salicylic acid (SA) defence hormone analogue Benzothiadiazole (BTH), or the immunogenic peptide flg22, induced Exo70B2 transport into the vacuole. We uncovered two ATG8-interacting motifs (AIMs) located in the C-terminal domain (C-domain) of Exo70B2 that mediate its recruitment into the vacuole. Moreover, we also show that Exo70B2 is phosphorylated near the AIMs and mimicking phosphorylation enhanced ATG8 interaction. Finally, Exo70B2 phosphonull lines were hypersensitive to BTH and more resistant to avirulent bacteria which induce SA production. Our results suggests a molecular mechanism in which phosphorylation of Exo70B2 by MPK3 functions in a feed-back system linking cellular signalling to the secretory pathway.
IPB Mainnav Search